Publications by authors named "Eun Jin Han"

18 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Risk factors for heel pressure injury in cardiovascular intensive care unit patients.

Int Wound J 2021 Nov 3. Epub 2021 Nov 3.

Yonsei University College of Nursing, Mo-Im Kim Nursing Research Institute, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

This study analyzed the risk factors for heel pressure injury in cardiovascular intensive care unit patients with the aim of laying the groundwork for preventive nursing interventions. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of 92 patients who were admitted to the cardiovascular surgical or medical intensive care unit of a university hospital in South Korea between January and December 2017. Of these patients, 31 and 61 were included to the heel pressure injury group and the non-heel pressure injury group, respectively. Data on their demographic, disease-related, and intensive care unit treatment characteristics, as well as the degree of pressure injury, were collected from the hospital's electronic medical records using a standardized form. Cardiac surgery (P < .001), operation time (P = .001), use of a mechanical ventilator (P < .001), use of vasoconstrictors (P < .001), use of sedative drugs (P < .001), and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation treatment (P < .001) were identified as significant risk factors for heel pressure injury. A total of 22 patients (71%) from the heel pressure injury group developed deep tissue injury, and 16 patients (51.6%) who received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation treatment developed heel pressure injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/iwj.13711DOI Listing
November 2021

[Development of a Diabetic Foot Ulceration Prediction Model and Nomogram].

J Korean Acad Nurs 2021 Jun;51(3):280-293

College of Nursing, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Korea.

Purpose: This study aimed to identify the risk factors for diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) to develop and evaluate the performance of a DFU prediction model and nomogram among people with diabetes mellitus (DM).

Methods: This unmatched case-control study was conducted with 379 adult patients (118 patients with DM and 261 controls) from four general hospitals in South Korea. Data were collected through a structured questionnaire, foot examination, and review of patients' electronic health records. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to build the DFU prediction model and nomogram. Further, their performance was analyzed using the Lemeshow-Hosmer test, concordance statistic (C-statistic), and sensitivity/specificity analyses in training and test samples.

Results: The prediction model was based on risk factors including previous foot ulcer or amputation, peripheral vascular disease, peripheral neuropathy, current smoking, and chronic kidney disease. The calibration of the DFU nomogram was appropriate (χ² = 5.85, = .321). The C-statistic of the DFU nomogram was .95 (95% confidence interval .93~.97) for both the training and test samples. For clinical usefulness, the sensitivity and specificity obtained were 88.5% and 85.7%, respectively at 110 points in the training sample. The performance of the nomogram was better in male patients or those having DM for more than 10 years.

Conclusion: The nomogram of the DFU prediction model shows good performance, and is thereby recommended for monitoring the risk of DFU and preventing the occurrence of DFU in people with DM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4040/jkan.20257DOI Listing
June 2021

A Prospective Randomized Study: The Usefulness and Efficacy of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy with Lipidocolloid Polyester Mesh Compared to Traditional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Treatment of Pressure Ulcers.

Pharmaceutics 2020 Aug 27;12(9). Epub 2020 Aug 27.

Institute for Human Tissue Restoration, Department of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722, Korea.

To improve healing of pressure ulcer wounds, it is important to optimize the conditions of the area surrounding the wound. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) promotes wound healing, however, the removal of NPWT can cause pain or focal bleeding, delaying wound healing or causing infection. In this study, we reviewed the efficacy of the lipidocolloid non-adherent dressing (Urgotul) as a wound contact layer. A total of 38 patients from the same facility who applied NPWT from April 2016 to October 2019 were included and divided into two groups; NPWT with the lipidocolloid non-adherent dressing (group 1, experimental group, 19 patients) and NPWT only (group 2, control group, 19 patients). The condition of the wound was examined prior to NPWT application, at one week, and again at three weeks after application. No significant differences were found between groups for general characteristics, bacterial culture or photo analysis. However, when comparing groups based on the time of examination, there was a significant reduction of the wound size in group 1 ( = 0.001) but not in group 2 ( = 0.082). Therefore, the current study finds that using the lipidocolloid non-adherent dressing as a wound contact layer in NPWT stimulates healing by shrinking the size of the pressure ulcer wound.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12090813DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7558317PMC
August 2020

Spatial association of public sports facilities with body mass index in Korea.

Geospat Health 2018 05 7;13(1):542. Epub 2018 May 7.

Department of Information and Industrial Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul.

Governments and also local councils create and enforce their own regional public health care plans for the problem of overweight and obesity in the population. Public sports facilities can help these plans. In this paper, we investigated the contribution of public sports facilities to the reduction of the obesity of local residents. We used the data obtained from the Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys; and measured the degree of obesity using body mass index (BMI). We conducted various spatial regression analyses including the global Moran's I test and local indicators of spatial autocorrelation analysis finding that there exists spatial dependence in the error term of spatial regression model for BMI. However, we also observed that the number of local public sports facilities is not significantly related to local BMI. This result can be caused by the low utilization ratio and an unbalanced spatial distribution of local public sports facilities. Based on our findings, we suggest that local councils need to improve the quality of public sports facilities encouraging the establishment of preferred types of pubic sports facilities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/gh.2018.542DOI Listing
May 2018

Suppression of NFAT5-mediated Inflammation and Chronic Arthritis by Novel κB-binding Inhibitors.

EBioMedicine 2017 Apr 31;18:261-273. Epub 2017 Mar 31.

Center for Integrative Rheumatoid Transcriptomics and Dynamics, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and arthritis. However, therapeutic agents inhibiting NFAT5 activity are currently unavailable. To discover NFAT5 inhibitors, a library of >40,000 chemicals was screened for the suppression of nitric oxide, a direct target regulated by NFAT5 activity, through high-throughput screening. We validated the anti-NFAT5 activity of 198 primary hit compounds using an NFAT5-dependent reporter assay and identified the novel NFAT5 suppressor KRN2, 13-(2-fluoro)-benzylberberine, and its derivative KRN5. KRN2 inhibited NFAT5 upregulation in macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and repressed the formation of NF-κB p65-DNA complexes in the NFAT5 promoter region. Interestingly, KRN2 selectively suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory genes, including Nos2 and Il6, without hampering high-salt-induced NFAT5 and its target gene expressions. Moreover, KRN2 and KRN5, the latter of which exhibits high oral bioavailability and metabolic stability, ameliorated experimentally induced arthritis in mice without serious adverse effects, decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Particularly, orally administered KRN5 was stronger in suppressing arthritis than methotrexate, a commonly used anti-rheumatic drug, displaying better potency and safety than its original compound, berberine. Therefore, KRN2 and KRN5 can be potential therapeutic agents in the treatment of chronic arthritis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2017.03.039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5405180PMC
April 2017

GREM1 Is a Key Regulator of Synoviocyte Hyperplasia and Invasiveness.

J Rheumatol 2016 Mar 1;43(3):474-85. Epub 2016 Feb 1.

From the POSTECH-CATHOLIC Biomedical Engineering Institute, and Department of Internal Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul; Center for Systems Biology of Plant Senescence and Life History, Institute for Basic Science, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu, Korea; Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Cancer Biology Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA.E.J. Han, PhD Candidate, POSTECH-CATHOLIC Biomedical Engineering Institute, Catholic University of Korea; S.A. Yoo, PhD, POSTECH-CATHOLIC Biomedical Engineering Institute, Catholic University of Korea; G.M. Kim, PhD Candidate, POSTECH-CATHOLIC Biomedical Engineering Institute, Catholic University of Korea; D. Hwang, PhD, Center for Systems Biology of Plant Senescence and Life History, Institute for Basic Science, DGIST; C.S. Cho, MD, PhD, POSTECH-CATHOLIC Biomedical Engineering Institute, Catholic University of Korea; S. You, PhD, Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Cancer Biology Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center; W.U. Kim, MD, PhD, POSTECH-CATHOLIC Biomedical Engineering Institute, and Department of Internal Medicine, Catholic University of Korea.

Objective: To investigate the expression of Gremlin 1 (GREM1), an antagonist of bone morphogenetic protein, in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovia and its involvement in the hyperplasia and invasiveness of fibroblast-like synoviocytes of RA (RA-FLS).

Methods: Computational analysis was introduced to identify FLS-predominant regulators. GREM1 expression was examined by immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR, and ELISA. FLS proliferation and apoptosis were determined using tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay and APOPercentage assay, respectively. FLS migration and invasion were evaluated by wound migration and Matrigel invasion assay, respectively. Expressions of Bax, Bcl2, pErk1/2, and pAkt were detected by Western blot analysis.

Results: Through global transcriptome profiling, we identified a GREM1 gene predominantly expressed in RA-FLS. Indeed, the GREM1 expression was higher in synovia, synovial fluids, and FLS of patients with RA than in those of patients with osteoarthritis, and its levels correlated well with proinflammatory cytokine concentrations. Knockdown of GREM1 transcripts using short interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced the proliferation and survival of RA-FLS along with downregulation of pErk1/2, pAkt, and Bcl2 expressions, whereas it induced Bax expression. Conversely, the addition of recombinant GREM1 to RA-FLS showed the opposite results. Moreover, GREM1 siRNA decreased the migratory and invasive capacity of RA-FLS, whereas exogenous GREM1 increased it. The GREM1-induced FLS survival, migration, and invasion were completely blocked by neutralizing antibodies to ανβ3 integrin on RA-FLS, suggesting that ανβ3 integrin mediates the antiapoptotic and promigratory effects of GREM1.

Conclusion: GREM1 is highly expressed in RA joints, and functions as a regulator of survival, proliferation, migration, and invasion of RA-FLS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.150523DOI Listing
March 2016

The Relationship between 10-Year Cardiovascular Risk Calculated Using the Pooled Cohort Equation and the Severity of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

Endocrinol Metab (Seoul) 2016 Mar;31(1):86-92

Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Background: We investigated the association between the severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the estimated 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) calculated by Pooled Cohort Equation (PCE) and Framingham risk score (FRS).

Methods: A total of 15,913 participants (mean age, 46.3 years) in a health screening program were selected for analysis. The presence and severity of fatty liver was assessed by abdominal ultrasonogram. Subjects who drank alcohol more than three times a week were excluded from the study.

Results: Among the participants, 57.6% had no NAFLD, 35.4% had grade I, 6.5% had grade II, and 0.5% had grade III NAFLD. Mean estimated 10-year CVD risk was 2.59%, 3.93%, 4.68%, and 5.23% calculated using the PCE (P for trend <0.01) and 4.55%, 6.39%, 7.33%, and 7.13% calculated using FRS, according to NAFLD severity from none to severe (P for trend <0.01). The odds ratio for ≥7.5% estimated CVD risk calculated using the PCE showed a higher correlation with increasing severity of NAFLD even after adjustment for conventional CVD risk factors (1.52, 2.56, 3.35 vs. the no NAFLD group as a reference, P<0.01) compared with calculated risk using FRS (1.65, 1.62, 1.72 vs. no NAFLD group as a reference, P<0.01).

Conclusion: In our study of apparently healthy Korean adults, increasing severity of NAFLD showed a higher correlation with estimated 10-year CVD risk when calculated using the PCE than when calculated using FRS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2016.31.1.86DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4803567PMC
March 2016

Association of low baseline free thyroxin levels with progression of coronary artery calcification over 4 years in euthyroid subjects: the Kangbuk Samsung Health Study.

Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 2016 06 3;84(6):889-95. Epub 2015 Nov 3.

Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Objective: Overt and subclinical hypothyroidism are risk factors for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. It is unclear whether thyroid hormone levels within the normal range are also associated with atherosclerosis measured by coronary artery calcium (CAC).

Context: This study aimed to examine the relationship between normal variations in thyroid function and changes in CAC.

Measurements: We conducted a 4-year retrospective study of 2173 apparently healthy men and women with normal thyroid hormone levels. Their free thyroxin (FT4), free triiodothyronin (FT3) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were measured by electrochemiluminescent immunoassay. The CAC score (CACS) of each subject was measured by multidetector computed tomography in both 2010 and 2014. Progression of CAC was defined as a CACS change over 4 years > 0.

Results: The mean CACS changes over 4 years by quartiles of baseline FT4 level (lowest to highest) were 12·9, 8·43, 7·82 and 7·81 (P = 0·028). CAC progression was not significantly associated with either the baseline FT3 or TSH levels. The odds ratios (OR) for CAC progression over 4 years (highest vs lowest quartile for baseline FT4) were 0·647 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0·472-0·886) after adjustment for confounding factor, which were attenuated with further adjustment for lipid profiles, homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and hypertension [0·747 (95% CI 0·537-1·038)]. Quartiles of baseline FT3 or TSH level did not show any increased OR for CAC progression after adjustment for confounding factors.

Conclusions: In this cohort of euthyroid men and women, a low baseline FT4 level was associated with a high risk of CACS progression over 4 years.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cen.12946DOI Listing
June 2016

Evidence for Association between the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene and Panic Disorder: A Novel Haplotype Analysis.

Psychiatry Investig 2015 Jan 1;12(1):112-7. Epub 2014 Oct 1.

Departmet of Psychiatry, Gacheon University Gil Hospital, School of Medicine, Incheon, Republic of Korea.

Objective: Panic disorder (PD) is a common psychiatric disorder with a complex etiology, and several studies have suggested that it has a genetic component. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most abundant of the neurotrophins in the brain and is recognized for its important role in the survival, differentiation and growth of neurons. Several lines of research have suggested possible associations between the BDNF gene and PD. In this study, we investigated the BDNF 196G/A (rs6265), 11757G/C (rs16917204), and 270C/T (rs56164415) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in order to determine an association with PD. We also identified the genetic sequence associations with PD via haplotype analysis.

Methods: Participants in this study included 136 PD patients and 263 healthy controls. Male and female subjects were analyzed separately. The genotype and allele frequencies of the PD patients and controls were analyzed using χ(2) statistics. Frequencies and haplotype reconstructions were calculated using the SNP analyzer 2.0.

Results: We found no significant statistical differences in the genotype distributions or allele frequencies of the three tested polymorphisms between the PD and control groups. In addition, no differences were found between PD patients and the controls in either male or female subgroups. However, we found that, the frequency of the G-C haplotype for 196G/A and 11757G/C was significantly higher in PD patients than in the controls.

Conclusion: Our result suggest that patients with the G-C haplotype for 196G/A and 11757G/C may be more susceptible to the development of PD. Further studies are needed to replicate the associations that we observed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4306/pi.2015.12.1.112DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4310908PMC
January 2015

The xanthine oxidase-NFAT5 pathway regulates macrophage activation and TLR-induced inflammatory arthritis.

Eur J Immunol 2014 Sep 11;44(9):2721-36. Epub 2014 Aug 11.

POSTECH-CATHOLIC BioMedical Engineering Institute, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

NFAT5 (nuclear factor of activated T cells), a well-known osmoprotective factor, can be activated by isotonic stimuli such as Toll-like receptor (TLR) triggering. However, it is unclear how NFAT5 discriminates between isotonic and hypertonic stimuli to produce different functional and molecular outcomes. Here, we identified a novel XO-ROS-p38 MAPK-NFAT5 pathway (XO is xanthine oxidase, ROS is reactive oxygen species) that is activated in RAW 264.7 macrophages upon isotonic TLR stimulation. Unlike what is seen under hypertonic conditions, XO-derived ROS were selectively required for the TLR-induced NFAT5 activation and NFAT5 binding to the IL-6 promoter in RAW 264.7 macrophages under isotonic conditions. In mouse peritoneal macrophages and human macrophages, TLR ligation also induced NFAT5 activation, which was dependent on XO and p38 kinase. The involvement of XO in NFAT5 activation by TLR was confirmed in RAW 264.7 macrophages implanted in BALB/c mice. Moreover, allopurinol, an XO inhibitor, suppressed arthritis severity and decreased the expression of NFAT5 and IL-6 in splenic macrophages in C57BL/6 mice. Collectively, these data support a novel function of the XO-NFAT5 axis in macrophage activation and TLR-induced arthritis, and suggest that XO inhibitor(s) could serve as a therapeutic agent for chronic inflammatory arthritis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eji.201343669DOI Listing
September 2014

Effects of a 'drug holiday' on bone mineral density and bone turnover marker during bisphosphonate therapy.

J Bone Metab 2013 May 13;20(1):31-5. Epub 2013 May 13.

Department of Internal Medicine, Cheil General Hospital & Women's Healthcare Center, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Background: Recently long-term safety of bisphosphonate raises issues about the duration of therapy. We examined the effects of a drug holiday (DH) on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover markers.

Methods: In Korean, 125 women of 50 years of age or older with T-score≤-3.0 of their lumbar or left femoral BMD initiated bisphosphonate from 1999 based on retrospective chart review. 125 patients who had used bisphosphonate≥5 years started DH in 2006. Lumbar (L1-4), left femoral neck, total BMD, serum parameter (β-crossLaps [CTx], phosphorus, total calcium, total alkaline phosphatase), and urinary parameter (calcium/creatinine ratio) were measured before, the time of starting, and after DH.

Results: After DH, lumbar, femoral neck and total BMD did not change significantly (0.757±0.093→0.747±0.102, P=0.135, 0.567±0.079→0.560±0.082, P=0.351, 0.698±0.008→0.691±0.090 g/cm(2), P=0.115, respectively). Serum CTx and total alkaline phosphatase were increased significantly (0.205±0.120→0.791±0.44 ng/mL, P<0.001, 54.52±13.40→60.42±15.543 IU/L, P=0.001, respectively). Urinary calcium/creatinine ratio increased significantly (0.132±0.076→0.156±0.093, P=0.012).

Conclusions: A DH could be cautiously considered in patients with long-term use of bisphosphonate if there is a concern about severe suppression of bone turnover with respect to long-term use because insignificant changes of BMD and significant increase of bone turnover markers are shown during the period.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11005/jbm.2013.20.1.31DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3780827PMC
May 2013

Thyroid dysfunction associated with administration of the long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist.

Endocrinol Metab (Seoul) 2013 Sep 13;28(3):221-5. Epub 2013 Sep 13.

Department of Internal Medicine, Cheil General Hospital & Women's Healthcare Center, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist has been used in the treatment of a wide variety of sex-hormone-related diseases, as the administration of GnRH agonist can alter the secretion of gonadotropin and sex hormones. Recently, we found that the long-acting GnRH agonist aggravated hyperthyroidism and induced painless thyroiditis. This is the first report to demonstrate the association of thyroid dysfunction with GnRH agonist injection in Korea. Here, we report three cases and emphasize the clinical importance of this aggravating factor in autoimmune thyroid disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2013.28.3.221DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3811697PMC
September 2013

Antimicrobial effect of bacteriocin KU24 produced by Lactococcus lactis KU24 against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

J Food Sci 2013 Mar 8;78(3):M465-9. Epub 2013 Feb 8.

Division of Animal Life Science and Bio/Molecular Informatics Center, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Bacteriocin KU24 produced by Lactococcus lactis KU24 exhibited an inhibitory effect against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Bacteriocin KU24 was inactivated by protease XIV, showing that it has a proteinaceous nature on S. aureus ATCC 33591. Also, bacteriocin KU24 exhibited a strong heat stability (121 °C for 15 min) and pH stability (pH 3 to 9). The mode of inhibition was determined for S. aureus ATCC 33591 by treatment of 0, 250, and 500 AU/mL of bacteriocin KU24. S. aureus ATCC 33591 was inhibited by added bacteriocin KU24, while control was increased. The cell membranes of S. aureus ATCC 33591 were damaged with treatment of 500 AU/mL of bacteriocin KU24. Also, bacteriocin KU24 inhibited the occurrence of mecA gene, the methicillin resistance gene in S. aureus ATCC 33591. Bacteriocin KU24 was purified by C18 Sep-Pack column, cation exchange chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography, and molecular mass is approximately 6.5 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results demonstrate that bacteriocin KU24 can be used as an alternative antimicrobial agent for the treatment of infection of MRSA in the food industry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1750-3841.12053DOI Listing
March 2013

Conflicts and communication between high-achieving Chinese American adolescents and their parents.

New Dir Child Adolesc Dev 2012 ;2012(135):35-57

Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA.

Drawing on in-depth interview data collected on 18 high-achieving Chinese American students, the authors examine domains of acculturation-based conflicts, parent and child internal conflicts, and conflict resolution in their families. Their analyses show that well-established negative communication patterns in educational expectations, divergent attitudes toward other races and country of origin, and cultural and language barriers contributed to parent-child conflicts. Their findings also illustrate important internal conflicts both adolescents and parents had along the cultural tightrope of autonomy and relatedness. Finally, the vertical in-group conflict resolution style that was evidenced in youths' accounts raises questions about cultural differences in constructive versus destructive conflict resolution styles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cd.20003DOI Listing
June 2012

Prediction of compensated liver cirrhosis by ultrasonography and routine blood tests in patients with chronic viral hepatitis.

Korean J Hepatol 2010 Dec;16(4):369-75

Department of Gastroenterology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.

Background/aims: Liver biopsy is a standard method for diagnosis of liver cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis. Because liver biopsy is an invasive method, non-invasive methods have been used for diagnosis of compensated liver cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis. The current study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasonography and routine blood tests for diagnosis of compensated liver cirrhosis in patients with chronic viral hepatitis.

Methods: Two hundred three patients with chronic viral hepatitis who underwent liver biopsy were included in this study and ultrasonography and routine blood tests were analyzed retrospectively. Ultrasonographic findings, including surface nodularity, parenchyma echogenecity, and spleen size, were evaluated. The diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography and routine blood tests were examined.

Results: Discriminant analysis with forward stepwise selection of variables showed that liver surface nodularity, platelet count, and albumin level were independently associated with compensated liver cirrhosis (p<0.05). Cross-tabulation revealed that the following 4 variables had >95% specificity: platelet count <100,000 /uL; albumin level <3.5 g/dL; INR >1.3; and surface nodularity. If at least one of the four variables exists in a patient with chronic viral hepatitis, we can predict liver cirrhosis with 90% specificity and 61% sensitivity.

Conclusions: These results suggest that four variables (platelet count <100,000 /uL, albumin level <3.5 g/dL, INR >1.3, and surface nodularity) can be used for identification of liver cirrhosis in patients with chronic viral hepatitis with high specificity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3350/kjhep.2010.16.4.369DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3304612PMC
December 2010
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