Publications by authors named "Eugene S Han"

2 Publications

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Fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) is expressed in the lower genital tract and may play a role in amplifying inflammation during infection.

J Reprod Immunol 2010 Jan 5;84(1):16-23. Epub 2009 Dec 5.

Section of Infectious Diseases, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA 02118, USA.

TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) cytokine superfamily which regulates a number of cellular responses, including inflammation and proliferation. TWEAK is primarily secreted by phagocytic cells and its receptor, fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14), is expressed on non-lymphoid cells, including epithelial, endothelial and mesenchymal cells. The TWEAK/Fn14 pathway is highly conserved from an evolutionary standpoint, and has been shown to play a role in tissue regeneration and inflammation in the liver, kidney, lung and skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that TWEAK/Fn14 might have a physiological role in regulating infection-induced inflammation in the lower female genital tract. To test this hypothesis, we examined expression of the receptor Fn14 in relevant cells and tissue. Receptor function was tested by treating cells with recombinant TWEAK, with and without other known proinflammatory stimuli. Flow cytometric analysis of vaginal and cervical epithelial cells revealed that Fn14 was highly expressed at the cell surface. We also detected both Fn14 and TWEAK in whole cervical tissue by RT-PCR. Treatment of vaginal and cervical epithelial cells with recombinant TWEAK led to a weak induction of the chemokine IL-8. However, TWEAK potentiated the effects of IL-1ss, the TLR2 ligand Pam(3)CysSK(4), and live Neisseria gonorrhoeae in a synergistic manner. These data reveal a novel pathway for regulation of microbial-induced inflammation in the female reproductive tract and suggest that interference with the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway might be an approach to abrogate excessive infection-induced inflammation caused by sexually transmitted pathogens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jri.2009.09.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2814934PMC
January 2010

RecJ exonuclease: substrates, products and interaction with SSB.

Nucleic Acids Res 2006 18;34(4):1084-91. Epub 2006 Feb 18.

Department of Biology and Rosenstiel Basic Medical Sciences Research Center, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 02454-9110, USA.

The RecJ exonuclease from Escherichia coli degrades single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in the 5'-3' direction and participates in homologous recombination and mismatch repair. The experiments described here address RecJ's substrate requirements and reaction products. RecJ complexes on a variety of 5' single-strand tailed substrates were analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift in the absence of Mg2+ ion required for substrate degradation. RecJ required single-stranded tails of 7 nt or greater for robust binding; addition of Mg2+ confirmed that substrates with 5' tails of 6 nt or less were poor substrates for RecJ exonuclease. RecJ is a processive exonuclease, degrading approximately 1000 nt after a single binding event to single-strand DNA, and releases mononucleotide products. RecJ is capable of degrading a single-stranded tail up to a double-stranded junction, although products in such reactions were heterogeneous and RecJ showed a limited ability to penetrate the duplex region. RecJ exonuclease was equally potent on 5' phosphorylated and unphosphorylated ends. Finally, DNA binding and nuclease activity of RecJ was specifically enhanced by the pre-addition of ssDNA-binding protein and we propose that this specific interaction may aid recruitment of RecJ.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkj503DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1373692PMC
February 2006