Publications by authors named "Eugene Connolly"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Heart Failure Hospitalization in Adults Receiving Hemodialysis and the Effect of Intravenous Iron Therapy.

JACC Heart Fail 2021 Jul 9;9(7):518-527. Epub 2021 Jun 9.

Department of Renal Medicine, King's College Hospital, London, United Kingdom.

Objectives: This study sought to examine the effect of intravenous iron on heart failure events in hemodialysis patients.

Background: Heart failure is a common and deadly complication in patients receiving hemodialysis and is difficult to diagnose and treat.

Methods: The study analyzed heart failure events in the PIVOTAL (Proactive IV Iron Therapy in Hemodialysis Patients) trial, which compared intravenous iron administered proactively in a high-dose regimen with a low-dose regimen administered reactively. Heart failure hospitalization was an adjudicated outcome, a component of the primary composite outcome, and a prespecified secondary endpoint in the trial.

Results: Overall, 2,141 participants were followed for a median of 2.1 years. A first fatal or nonfatal heart failure event occurred in 51 (4.7%) of 1,093 patients in the high-dose iron group and in 70 (6.7%) of 1,048 patients in the low-dose group (HR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.46-0.94; P = 0.023). There was a total of 63 heart failure events (including first and recurrent events) in the high-dose iron group and 98 in the low-dose group, giving a rate ratio of 0.59 (95% CI: 0.40-0.87; P = 0.0084). Most patients presented with pulmonary edema and were mainly treated by mechanical removal of fluid. History of heart failure and diabetes were independent predictors of a heart failure event.

Conclusions: Compared with a lower-dose regimen, high-dose intravenous iron decreased the occurrence of first and recurrent heart failure events in patients undergoing hemodialysis, with large relative and absolute risk reductions. (UK Multicentre Open-label Randomised Controlled Trial Of IV Iron Therapy In Incident Haemodialysis Patients; 2013-002267-25).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jchf.2021.04.005DOI Listing
July 2021

Magnetically Levitated Left Ventricular Assist Device.

N Engl J Med 2019 08;381(5):489-490

Harefield Hospital, London, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMc1907673DOI Listing
August 2019

Randomized trial of switching from prescribed non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to prescribed celecoxib: the Standard care vs. Celecoxib Outcome Trial (SCOT).

Eur Heart J 2017 Jun;38(23):1843-1850

Medicines Monitoring Unit (MEMO), Division of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital & Medical School Dundee, Dundee DD1 9SY, UK.

Background: Selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors and conventional non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs) have been associated with adverse cardiovascular (CV) effects. We compared the CV safety of switching to celecoxib vs. continuing nsNSAID therapy in a European setting.

Method: Patients aged 60 years and over with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, free from established CV disease and taking chronic prescribed nsNSAIDs, were randomized to switch to celecoxib or to continue their previous nsNSAID. The primary endpoint was hospitalization for non-fatal myocardial infarction or other biomarker positive acute coronary syndrome, non-fatal stroke or CV death analysed using a Cox model with a pre-specified non-inferiority limit of 1.4 for the hazard ratio (HR).

Results: In total, 7297 participants were randomized. During a median 3-year follow-up, fewer subjects than expected developed an on-treatment (OT) primary CV event and the rate was similar for celecoxib, 0.95 per 100 patient-years, and nsNSAIDs, 0.86 per 100 patient-years (HR = 1.12, 95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.55; P = 0.50). Comparable intention-to-treat (ITT) rates were 1.14 per 100 patient-years with celecoxib and 1.10 per 100 patient-years with nsNSAIDs (HR = 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.33; P = 0.75). Pre-specified non-inferiority was achieved in the ITT analysis. The upper bound of the 95% confidence limit for the absolute increase in OT risk associated with celecoxib treatment was two primary events per 1000 patient-years exposure. There were only 15 adjudicated secondary upper gastrointestinal complication endpoints (0.078/100 patient-years on celecoxib vs. 0.053 on nsNSAIDs OT, 0.078 vs. 0.053 ITT). More gastrointestinal serious adverse reactions and haematological adverse reactions were reported on nsNSAIDs than celecoxib, but more patients withdrew from celecoxib than nsNSAIDs (50.9% patients vs. 30.2%; P < 0.0001).

Interpretation: In subjects 60 years and over, free from CV disease and taking prescribed chronic nsNSAIDs, CV events were infrequent and similar on celecoxib and nsNSAIDs. There was no advantage of a strategy of switching prescribed nsNSAIDs to prescribed celecoxib. This study excluded an increased risk of the primary endpoint of more than two events per 1000 patient-years associated with switching to prescribed celecoxib.

Clinical Trial Registration: https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00447759; Unique identifier: NCT00447759.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehw387DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5837371PMC
June 2017

Falling Cardiovascular Mortality in Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction and Implications for Clinical Trials.

JACC Heart Fail 2015 Aug;3(8):603-14

BHF Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Objectives: This study examined the trends in the relative contributions of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality to total mortality according to use of beta-blockers in clinical trials of patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF).

Background: With the increasingly widespread use of disease-modifying therapies, particularly beta-blockers, in HF-REF, the proportion of patients dying from cardiovascular causes is likely to be decreasing.

Methods: In a systematic review, 2 investigators independently searched online databases to identify clinical trials including >400 patients with chronic heart failure published between 1986 and 2014 and that adjudicated cause of death. Trials were divided into 3 groups on the basis of the proportion of patients treated with a beta-blocker (<33% [low], 33% to 66% [medium], and >66% [high]). Percentages of total deaths adjudicated as cardiovascular or noncardiovascular were calculated by weighted means and weighted standard deviations. Weighted Student t tests were used to compare results between groups.

Results: Sixty-six trials met the inclusion criteria with a total of 136,182 patients and 32,140 deaths. There was a sequential increase in the percentage of noncardiovascular deaths with increasing beta-blocker use from 11.4% of all deaths in trials with low beta-blocker use to 19.1% in those with high beta-blocker use (p < 0.001).

Conclusions: In trials of patients with HF-REF, the proportion of deaths adjudicated as cardiovascular has decreased. Cardiovascular mortality, and not all-cause mortality, should be used as an endpoint for trials of new treatments for HF-REF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jchf.2015.03.013DOI Listing
August 2015

Dopamine in acute decompensated heart failure: does left ventricular ejection fraction matter?

Int J Cardiol 2014 Jul 15;174(3):739. Epub 2014 Apr 15.

BHF Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8TA, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2014.04.092DOI Listing
July 2014
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