Publications by authors named "Eu Gene Chin"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A novel dissemination effort for prolonged exposure: Practice and dissemination curriculum.

Psychol Trauma 2019 Mar 25;11(3):314-318. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The University of Mississippi Medical Center.

Objectives: This study examines the effectiveness of a novel dissemination and implementation curriculum for prolonged exposure (PE). Predoctoral clinical psychology interns completed a sequential, four-part curriculum that culminated in a community-based practicum during which interns conducted a PE workshop. We hypothesized that workshop participants would report more favorable attitudes regarding PE after completing the intern-led workshop than endorsed at the outset of the workshop.

Method: A total of 53 workshop participants attended and completed questionnaires. The majority of workshop participants had a master's-level degree or educational specialist degree (n = 28; 57.1%) and were currently a counselor or psychosocial rehabilitation worker (n = 21; 42.9%). We examined changes between pre- and posttraining time points for five self-report items related to negative attitudes toward PE and three self-report items related to intent to use PE.

Results: There was a significant effect of workshop training on four out of five items related to negative attitudes toward PE. The nonsignificant result of the fifth item may be due to a ceiling effect given that baseline scores for this item were very positive. There was a significant effect of workshop training on all three items related to intent to use PE.

Conclusions: Results suggested that this sequential four-part curriculum may be an effective way of combining education, training, and dissemination efforts. Future research should examine if similar results can be achieved with a controlled research design and whether outcomes would generalize to actual PE delivery skills in routine clinical care. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/tra0000362DOI Listing
March 2019

Depression, Anxiety, and Stress: How Should Clinicians Interpret the Total and Subscale Scores of the 21-Item Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales?

Psychol Rep 2019 Aug 22;122(4):1550-1575. Epub 2018 Jun 22.

Department of Psychology, University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS, USA.

The 21-item Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales (DASS-21) is a self-report measure that is easy to administer, quick to score, and is freely available. Widely used in diverse settings and populations, confirmatory factor analytic evidence has accumulated for a bifactor model underlying this multidimensional measure. Studies employing an exploratory bifactor approach to more closely examine its underlying structure and inter-relations of factors, however, have been scarce. This is unfortunate because confirmatory techniques often employ indirect ways of handling model misspecification, whereas exploratory methods enable more direct approaches. Moreover, more precise approaches to modeling an exploratory bifactor structure have not been examined with the DASS-21. Based on several large samples of undergraduate students in the United States, the first two parts of the paper (Studies 1 and 2) utilized both exploratory ( = 19.7 years of age) and confirmatory factor analytic methods ( = 19.7 years of age) following those presented by contemporary multidimensional modeling theorists. Building upon these results, the third part of the paper (Study 3;  = 20.0 years of age) examined sensitivity-/specificity-related indices to provide cut-off score recommendations for a revised DASS-21 instrument based on a newly identified and supported bifactor structure. Implications of these results are discussed in terms of taxonomy, challenges inherent in multidimensional modeling, and potential use of the revised DASS-21 measure as a component of an actuarial decision-making strategy to inform clinical referrals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0033294118783508DOI Listing
August 2019

Pre-treatment predictors of dropout from prolonged exposure therapy in patients with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder and comorbid substance use disorders.

Behav Res Ther 2017 04 25;91:43-50. Epub 2017 Jan 25.

Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The University of Mississippi Medical Center, United States. Electronic address:

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders (SUDs) are commonly co-occurring disorders associated with more adverse consequences than PTSD alone. Prolonged exposure therapy (PE) is one of the most efficacious treatments for PTSD. However, among individuals with PTSD-SUD, 35-62% of individuals drop out of trauma-focused exposure treatments. Thus, it is important to identify predictors of PTSD treatment dropout among substance abusers with PTSD in order to gain information about adapting treatment strategies to enhance retention and outcomes. The current study explored pre-treatment predictors of early termination from PE treatment in a sample of 85 individuals receiving concurrent treatment for PTSD and a SUD in a residential treatment facility as part of a randomized controlled trial. The results indicated that less education and more anxiety sensitivity uniquely predicted PE treatment dropout. Demographic variables, PTSD severity, SUD severity, mental health comorbidities, and emotion regulation difficulties did not predict treatment dropout. These results suggest that adding pre-treatment interventions that address anxiety sensitivity, and promote social adjustment and cognitive flexibility, could possibly improve PE retention rates in clients with high anxiety or low education.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2017.01.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5328858PMC
April 2017

Do Concepts of Depression Predict Treatment Pathways? A Closer Look at Explanatory Models Among Clinical and Nonclinical Samples in Uganda.

J Clin Psychol 2017 Jul 2;73(7):893-909. Epub 2016 Nov 2.

Makerere University.

Objective: Explanatory models (EMs) are a collection of beliefs about a disorder that can help us understand help-seeking and treatment pathways in diverse contexts. In 2 related studies, we explore EMs about depression held among both clinical and nonclinical samples in Uganda. To explore the potential of EMs to predict help seeking, we assessed the relationship between 2 main aspects of the EM: problem conceptualization and treatment.

Method: In Study 1, we interviewed and assessed EMs of depression for 135 lay community members and 111 professional practitioners using a vignette. In Study 2, we assessed actual EMs among 33 clinically depressed adults. We transcribed all interviews and analyzed and coded the content. In Study 1, we used logistic regression to examine the relationship of problem conceptualization and stigma to treatment choice; in Study 2, we used Fisher's exact tests to examine the relationship between conceptualization and treatment. Sociodemographics such as age, income, and language were also examined.

Results: Interviews elicited a diverse range of beliefs about the nature of depression and the types of treatment needed. However, problem conceptualization did not predict treatment in either group. Instead, education and interview language predicted treatment in clinical and nonclinical samples.

Conclusion: Although EMs can be useful for both exploring mental health and treatment-related beliefs in clinical settings and developing mental health services, contextual factors may be more significant predictors of help seeking.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jclp.22378DOI Listing
July 2017

Measuring social desirability across language and sex: A comparison of Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale factor structures in English and Mandarin Chinese in Malaysia.

Psych J 2016 Jun 11;5(2):92-100. Epub 2016 May 11.

Department of Psychology, University of Mississippi University, Mississippi, USA.

Malaysia is a Southeast Asian country in which multiple languages are prominently spoken, including English and Mandarin Chinese. As psychological science continues to develop within Malaysia, there is a need for psychometrically sound instruments that measure psychological phenomena in multiple languages. For example, assessment tools for measuring social desirability could be a useful addition in psychological assessments and research studies in a Malaysian context. This study examined the psychometric performance of the English and Mandarin Chinese versions of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale when used in Malaysia. Two hundred and eighty-three students (64% female; 83% Chinese, 9% Indian) from two college campuses completed the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale in their language of choice (i.e., English or Mandarin Chinese). Proposed factor structures were compared with confirmatory factor analysis, and multiple indicators-multiple causes models were used to examine measurement invariance across language and sex. Factor analyses supported a two-factor structure (i.e., Attribution and Denial) for the measure. Invariance tests revealed the scale was invariant by sex, indicating that social desirability can be interpreted similarly across sex. The scale was partially invariant by language version, with some non-invariance observed within the Denial factor. Non-invariance may be related to differences in the English and Mandarin Chinese languages, as well as cultural differences. Directions for further research include examining the measurement of social desirability in other contexts where both English and Mandarin Chinese are spoken (i.e., China) and further examining the causes of non-invariance on specific items.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pchj.124DOI Listing
June 2016

The Loneliness Questionnaire: Establishing Measurement Invariance Across Ethnic Groups.

Assessment 2017 Sep 13;24(6):798-809. Epub 2016 Jan 13.

4 University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS, USA.

A state of loneliness describes an individual's perception of having dissatisfying social connections to others. Though it is notable across the life span, it may have particularly deleterious effects in childhood and adolescence, leading to increased risk of emotional impairment. The current study evaluates a widely used test of loneliness, the Loneliness Questionnaire, for measurement invariance across ethnic groups in a large, representative sample of youth in the 2nd to 12th grades ( N = 12,344; 41% African American) in Mississippi. Analyses were conducted using multigroup confirmatory factor analysis following a published, sequential method to examine invariance in form, factor loadings, and item intercepts. Overall, our results indicated that the instrument was invariant across ethnicities, suggesting that youth with equivalent manifest scores can be discerned as having comparable levels of latent loneliness. The loneliness scores also corresponded significantly with depression and anxiety scores for most subsamples, with one exception. These findings are discussed in the context of previous results comparing levels of loneliness across ethnicities. Additionally, the broader context of the need to expand invariance studies in instrumentation work is highlighted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1073191115625799DOI Listing
September 2017

Application of the tripartite model to a complicated sample of residential youth with externalizing problems.

Child Psychiatry Hum Dev 2013 Jun;44(3):469-78

Department of Psychology, University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS 38677, USA.

The tripartite model of anxiety and depression has received strong support among child and adolescent populations. Clinical samples of children and adolescents in these studies, however, have usually been referred for treatment of anxiety and depression. This study investigated the fit of the tripartite model with a complicated sample of residential youths with externalizing problems. Structural Equation Modeling was used to test the tripartite model relationships between negative affect, positive affect, and mood symptoms. Multiple fit indices were used to provide a reliable and conservative evaluation of the model. As predicted, the tripartite model provided a good fit for symptoms of emotional disorders in this complicated sample of children and adolescents. Implications of these findings are discussed in terms of the utility of the tripartite model in understanding anxiety and depression in more diverse populations and recommendations for residential assessment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10578-012-0341-yDOI Listing
June 2013