Publications by authors named "Etchell Cordero"

4 Publications

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Linaclotide, through activation of guanylate cyclase C, acts locally in the gastrointestinal tract to elicit enhanced intestinal secretion and transit.

Eur J Pharmacol 2010 Dec 20;649(1-3):328-35. Epub 2010 Sep 20.

Ironwood Pharmaceuticals Inc., 301 Binney Street, Cambridge, MA, 02142, USA.

Linaclotide is a first-in-class, orally administered 14-amino acid peptide that is in development for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and chronic constipation. We have characterized the solution structure of linaclotide, the in vitro binding and agonist activity to guanylate cyclase C receptors, the stability of linaclotide under conditions mimicking the gastric environment, oral bioavailability, and the pharmacodynamic effects in rat models of gastrointestinal transit and intestinal secretion. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis determined that the molecular structure of linaclotide is stabilized by three intramolecular disulfide bridges. Linaclotide exhibited high affinity and pH-independent binding (K(i): 1.23-1.64 nM) to guanylate cyclase C receptors on human colon carcinoma T84 cells and concomitantly, linaclotide binding resulted in a significant, concentration-dependent accumulation of intracellular cyclic guanosine-3', 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) (EC₅₀:99 nM). Linaclotide was stable after 3 h incubation in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1) and similarly, was completely resistant to hydrolysis by pepsin. Pharmacokinetic analysis of linaclotide showed very low oral bioavailability (0.1%). Orally administered linaclotide elicited a significant, dose-dependent increase in gastrointestinal transit rates in rats at doses of ≥5 μg/kg. Exposure of surgically ligated small intestinal loops to linaclotide induced a significant increase in fluid secretion, accompanied by a significant increase in intraluminal cGMP levels. These results suggest that the guanylate cyclase C agonist linaclotide elicits potent pharmacological responses locally in the gastrointestinal tract, and that orally administered guanylate cyclase C agonists may be capable of improving bowel habits in patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and chronic constipation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2010.09.019DOI Listing
December 2010

Linaclotide is a potent and selective guanylate cyclase C agonist that elicits pharmacological effects locally in the gastrointestinal tract.

Life Sci 2010 May 20;86(19-20):760-5. Epub 2010 Mar 20.

Ironwood Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 320 Bent Street, Cambridge, MA 02141, USA.

Aims: Linaclotide is an orally administered 14-amino acid peptide being developed for the treatment of constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C) and chronic constipation. We determined the stability of linaclotide in the intestine, measured the oral bioavailability, and investigated whether the pharmacodynamic effects elicited in rodent models of gastrointestinal function are mechanistically linked to the activation of intestinal guanylate cyclase C (GC-C).

Main Methods: Linaclotide binding to intestinal mucosal membranes was assessed in competitive binding assays. Stability and oral bioavailability of linaclotide were measured in small intestinal fluid and serum, respectively, and models of gastrointestinal function were conducted using wild type (wt) and GC-C null mice.

Key Findings: Linaclotide inhibited in vitro [(125)I]-STa binding to intestinal mucosal membranes from wt mice in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, [(125)I]-STa binding to these membranes from GC-C null mice was significantly decreased. After incubation in vitro in jejunal fluid for 30 min, linaclotide was completely degraded. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed very low oral bioavailability (0.10%). In intestinal secretion and transit models, linaclotide exhibited significant pharmacological effects in wt, but not in GC-C null mice: induction of increased fluid secretion into surgically ligated jejunal loops was accompanied by the secretion of elevated levels of cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate and accelerated gastrointestinal transit.

Significance: Linaclotide is a potent and selective GC-C agonist that elicits pharmacological effects locally in the gastrointestinal tract. This pharmacological profile suggests that orally administered linaclotide may be capable of improving the abdominal symptoms and bowel habits of patients suffering from IBS-C and chronic constipation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lfs.2010.03.015DOI Listing
May 2010

Layilin, a cell surface hyaluronan receptor, interacts with merlin and radixin.

Exp Cell Res 2005 Aug;308(1):177-87

Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.

Layilin is a widely expressed integral membrane hyaluronan receptor, originally identified as a binding partner of talin located in membrane ruffles. We have identified merlin, the neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor suppressor protein and radixin, as other interactors with the carboxy-terminal domain of layilin. We show that the carboxy-terminal domain of layilin is capable of binding to the amino-terminal domain of radixin. An interdomain interaction between the amino- and the carboxy-terminal domains of radixin inhibits its ability to bind to layilin. In the presence of acidic phospholipids, the interdomain interaction of radixin is inhibited and layilin can bind to full-length radixin. In contrast, layilin binds both full-length and amino-terminal merlin-GST fusion proteins without a requirement for phospholipids. Furthermore, layilin antibody can immunoprecipitate merlin, confirming association in vivo between these two proteins, which also display similar subcellular localizations in ruffling membranes. No interaction was observed between layilin and ezrin or layilin and moesin. These findings expand the known binding partners of layilin to include other members of the talin/band 4.1/ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) family of cytoskeletal-membrane linker molecules. This in turn suggests that layilin may mediate signals from extracellular matrix to the cell cytoskeleton via interaction with different intracellular binding partners and thereby be involved in the modulation of cortical structures in the cell.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yexcr.2005.04.017DOI Listing
August 2005

Integrating transcriptional and metabolite profiles to direct the engineering of lovastatin-producing fungal strains.

Nat Biotechnol 2003 Feb 21;21(2):150-6. Epub 2003 Jan 21.

Microbia, Inc., 320 Bent Street, Cambridge, MA 02141, USA.

We describe a method to decipher the complex inter-relationships between metabolite production trends and gene expression events, and show how information gleaned from such studies can be applied to yield improved production strains. Genomic fragment microarrays were constructed for the Aspergillus terreus genome, and transcriptional profiles were generated from strains engineered to produce varying amounts of the medically significant natural product lovastatin. Metabolite detection methods were employed to quantify the polyketide-derived secondary metabolites lovastatin and (+)-geodin in broths from fermentations of the same strains. Association analysis of the resulting transcriptional and metabolic data sets provides mechanistic insight into the genetic and physiological control of lovastatin and (+)-geodin biosynthesis, and identifies novel components involved in the production of (+)-geodin, as well as other secondary metabolites. Furthermore, this analysis identifies specific tools, including promoters for reporter-based selection systems, that we employed to improve lovastatin production by A. terreus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nbt781DOI Listing
February 2003