Publications by authors named "Esther Min"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Cumulative Impacts and COVID-19: Implications for Low-Income, Minoritized, and Health-Compromised Communities in King County, WA.

J Racial Ethn Health Disparities 2021 Jun 14. Epub 2021 Jun 14.

Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Few studies have assessed how the intersection of social determinants of health and environmental hazards contributes to racial disparities in COVID-19. The aim of our study was to compare COVID-19 disparities in testing and positivity to cumulative environmental health impacts, and to assess how unique social and environmental determinants of health relate to COVID-19 positivity in Seattle, King County, WA, at the census tract level. Publicly available data (n = 397 census tracts) were obtained from Public Health-Seattle & King County, 2018 ACS 5-year estimates, and the Washington Tracking Network. COVID-19 testing and positive case rates as of July 12, 2020, were mapped and compared to Washington State Environmental Health Disparities (EHD) Map cumulative impact rankings. We calculated odds ratios from a series of univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses using cumulative impact rankings, and community-level socioeconomic, health, and environmental factors as predictors and having ≥ 10% or < 10% census tract positivity as the binary outcome variable. We found a remarkable overlap between Washington EHD cumulative impact rankings and COVID-19 positivity in King County. Census tracts with ≥ 10 % COVID-19 positivity had significantly lower COVID-19 testing rates and higher proportions of people of color and faced a combination of low socioeconomic status-related outcomes, poor community health outcomes, and significantly higher concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM). King County communities experiencing high rates of COVID-19 face a disproportionate cumulative burden of environmental and social inequities. Cumulative environmental health impacts should therefore systematically be considered when assessing for risk of exposure to and health complications resulting from COVID-19.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40615-021-01063-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8202963PMC
June 2021

Community-Level Factors Associated with COVID-19 Cases and Testing Equity in King County, Washington.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 12 18;17(24). Epub 2020 Dec 18.

Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.

Individual-level Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) case data suggest that certain populations may be more impacted by the pandemic. However, few studies have considered the communities from which positive cases are prevalent, and the variations in testing rates between communities. In this study, we assessed community factors that were associated with COVID-19 testing and test positivity at the census tract level for the Seattle, King County, Washington region at the summer peak of infection in July 2020. Multivariate Poisson regression was used to estimate confirmed case counts, adjusted for testing numbers, which were associated with socioeconomic status (SES) indicators such as poverty, educational attainment, transportation cost, as well as with communities with high proportions of people of color. Multivariate models were also used to examine factors associated with testing rates, and found disparities in testing for communities of color and communities with transportation cost barriers. These results demonstrate the ability to identify tract-level indicators of COVID-19 risk and specific communities that are most vulnerable to COVID-19 infection, as well as highlight the ongoing need to ensure access to disease control resources, including information and education, testing, and future vaccination programs in low-SES and highly diverse communities.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249516DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7767300PMC
December 2020

The home air in agriculture pediatric intervention (HAPI) trial: Rationale and methods.

Contemp Clin Trials 2020 09 25;96:106085. Epub 2020 Jul 25.

Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States of America; Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States of America.

Background: Data addressing air quality effects on children with asthma in rural U.S. communities are rare. Our community engaged research partnership previously demonstrated associations between neighborhood NH and ambient PM and asthma in the agricultural lower Yakima Valley of Washington. As a next step, the partnership desired an intervention approach to address concerns about pediatric asthma in this largely Latino immigrant, farm worker community.

Objective: The Home Air in Agriculture Pediatric Intervention (HAPI) sought to examine the effectiveness of enrichment of an existing asthma education program with portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) cleaners designed to reduce PM and NH We investigated the effect of this enriched approach on these exposures and asthma health measures.

Design: We randomized children with poorly controlled asthma to a control arm (current asthma education program) or an intervention arm (current asthma education program + placement of two indoor air cleaners in the family's home). Outcomes included (1) 14-day integrated samples of indoor air contaminants (PM and NH) at baseline and one-year follow-up and (2) child asthma health metrics at baseline, midpoint (4-6 months) and one-year follow-up. These included the Asthma Control Test, symptoms days, clinical utilization, oral corticosteroid use, pulmonary function, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, and urinary leukotriene E concentration.

Discussion: To our knowledge, this is the first randomized HEPA cleaner intervention designed to assess NH as well as PM and to evaluate health outcomes of children with asthma in an agricultural region.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2020.106085DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7494646PMC
September 2020

The Washington State Environmental Health Disparities Map: Development of a Community-Responsive Cumulative Impacts Assessment Tool.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2019 11 13;16(22). Epub 2019 Nov 13.

Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.

Communities across Washington State have expressed the need for neighborhood-level information on the cumulative impact of environmental hazards and social conditions to illuminate disparities and address environmental justice issues. Many existing mapping tools have not explicitly integrated community voice and lived experience as an integral part of their development. The goals of this project were to create a new community-academic-government partnership to collect and summarize community concerns and to develop a publicly available mapping tool that ranks relative environmental health disparities for populations across Washington State. Using a community-driven framework, we developed the Washington Environmental Health Disparities Map, a cumulative environmental health impacts assessment tool. Nineteen regularly updated environmental and population indicators were integrated into the geospatial tool that allows for comparisons of the cumulative impacts between census tracts. This interactive map provides critical information for the public, agencies, policymakers, and community-based organizations to make informed decisions. The unique community-academic-government partnership and the community-driven framework can be used as a template for other environmental and social justice mapping endeavors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224470DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6888266PMC
November 2019

Chow fed UC Davis strain female Lepr fatty Zucker rats exhibit mild glucose intolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, and increased urine volume, all reduced by a Brown Norway strain chromosome 1 congenic donor region.

PLoS One 2017 6;12(12):e0188175. Epub 2017 Dec 6.

Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, United States of America.

Our objective is to identify genes that influence the development of any phenotypes of type 2 diabetes (T2D) or kidney disease in obese animals. We use the reproductively isolated UC Davis fatty Zucker strain rat model in which the defective chromosome 4 leptin receptor (LeprfaSte/faSte) results in fatty obesity. We previously produced a congenic strain with the distal half of chromosome 1 from the Brown Norway strain (BN) on a Zucker (ZUC) background (BN.ZUC-D1Rat183-D1Rat90). Previously published studies in males showed that the BN congenic donor region protects from some phenotypes of renal dysfunction and T2D. We now expand our studies to include females and expand phenotyping to gene expression. We performed diabetes and kidney disease phenotyping in chow-fed females of the BN.ZUC-D1Rat183-D1Rat90 congenic strain to determine the specific characteristics of the UC Davis model. Fatty LeprfaSte/faSte animals of both BN and ZUC genotype in the congenic donor region had prediabetic levels of fasting blood glucose and blood glucose 2 hours after a glucose tolerance test. We observed significant congenic strain chromosome 1 genotype effects of the BN donor region in fatty females that resulted in decreased food intake, urine volume, glucose area under the curve during glucose tolerance test, plasma triglyceride levels, and urine glucose excretion per day. In fatty females, there were significant congenic strain BN genotype effects on non-fasted plasma urea nitrogen, triglyceride, and creatinine. Congenic region genotype effects were observed by quantitative PCR of mRNA from the kidney for six genes, all located in the chromosome 1 BN donor region, with potential effects on T2D or kidney function. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the BN genotype chromosome 1 congenic region influences traits of both type 2 diabetes and kidney function in fatty UC Davis ZUC females and that there are many positional candidate genes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0188175PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5718614PMC
December 2017

Brown Norway chromosome 1 congenic reduces symptoms of renal disease in fatty Zucker rats.

PLoS One 2014 31;9(1):e87770. Epub 2014 Jan 31.

Department of Nutrition, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, California, United States of America ; Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, Davis, California, United States of America.

We previously reported that a congenic rat with Brown Norway (BN) alleles on chromosome 1 reduces renal disease of 15-week old fatty Zucker rats (ZUC). Development of renal disease in fatty BN congenic and fatty ZUC rats from 9 through 28 weeks is now examined. Analysis of urine metabolites by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed a significantly increased urinary loss of glucose, myo-inositol, urea, creatine, and valine in ZUC. Food intake was lower in the BN congenic rats at weeks 9-24, but they weighed significantly more at 28 weeks compared with the ZUC group. Fasting glucose was significantly higher in ZUC than congenic and adiponectin levels were significantly lower in ZUC, but there was no significant genotype effect on Insulin levels. Glucose tolerance tests exhibited no significant differences between ZUC and congenic when values were normalized to basal glucose levels. Quantitative PCR on livers revealed evidence for higher gluconeogenesis in congenics than ZUC at 9 weeks. Plasma urea nitrogen and creatinine were more than 2-fold higher in 28-week ZUC. Twelve urine protein markers of glomerular, proximal and distal tubule disease were assayed at three ages. Several proteins that indicate glomerular and proximal tubular disease increased with age in both congenic and ZUC. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) level, a marker whose levels decrease with distal tubule disease, was significantly higher in congenics. Quantitative histology of 28 week old animals revealed the most significant genotype effect was for tubular dilation and intratubular protein. The congenic donor region is protective of kidney disease, and effects on Type 2 diabetes are likely limited to fasting glucose and adiponectin. The loss of urea together with a small increase of food intake in ZUC support the hypothesis that nitrogen balance is altered in ZUC from an early age.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0087770PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3909223PMC
October 2014
-->