Publications by authors named "Estélio Henrique Martin Dantas"

31 Publications

Born to move: a review on the impact of physical exercise on brain health and the evidence from human controlled trials.

Arq Neuropsiquiatr 2021 06;79(6):536-550

Universidade Tiradentes, Departamento de Medicina, Laboratório de Biociências da Cinética Humana, Aracaju SE, Brazil.

Background: Physical exercise has been found to impact neurophysiological and structural aspects of the human brain. However, most research has used animal models, which yields much confusion regarding the real effects of exercise on the human brain, as well as the underlying mechanisms.

Objective: To present an update on the impact of physical exercise on brain health; and to review and analyze the evidence exclusively from human randomized controlled studies from the last six years.

Methods: A search of the literature search was conducted using the MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE, Web of Science and PsycINFO databases for all randomized controlled trials published between January 2014 and January 2020.

Results: Twenty-four human controlled trials that observed the relationship between exercise and structural or neurochemical changes were reviewed.

Conclusions: Even though this review found that physical exercise improves brain plasticity in humans, particularly through changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), functional connectivity, basal ganglia and the hippocampus, many unanswered questions remain. Given the recent advances on this subject and its therapeutic potential for the general population, it is hoped that this review and future research correlating molecular, psychological and image data may help elucidate the mechanisms through which physical exercise improves brain health.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0004-282X-ANP-2020-0166DOI Listing
June 2021

Centers of physical activities and health promotion during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) 2020 10;66(10):1328-1334

Programa de Pós-graduação Stricto Sensu em Enfermagem e Biociências da Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro - UNIRIO - Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1806-9282.66.10.1328DOI Listing
October 2020

Analysis of pain symptoms, flexibility and hydroxyproline concentration in individuals with low back pain submitted to Global Postural Re-education and stretching.

Pain Manag 2020 May 30;10(3):167-177. Epub 2020 Apr 30.

Laboratory of Exercise Physiology, Estácio de Sá University, Cabo Frio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

To evaluate pain, flexibility and hydroxyproline (HP) urinary levels in patients with nonspecific low back pain submitted to Global Postural Re-education (GPR) and stretching.   39 individuals who reported low back pain were randomly assigned to a group submitted to GPR (GPRG) or stretching exercises (SG) for 8 weeks. Pain and flexibility were assessed using the Borg CR10 scale and goniometry, respectively. The GPR group showed a significant reduction in the HP levels and significant improvements in flexibility after the intervention when compared with SG. Both groups presented a significant reduction in HP and pain after the intervention. Both interventions were effective in the treatment of low back pain. However, the GPR method presented better responses than stretching.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/pmt-2019-0053DOI Listing
May 2020

Multi- To Single-Joint or the Reverse Exercise Order Does Not Affect Pectoralis Major Workout Performance.

J Hum Kinet 2019 Mar 27;66:223-231. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Nursing and Biosciences Post-Graduation Program (PPgEnfBio), Doctorate of Federal University of State of Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of multi- to single-joint or the reverse exercise order on repetition performance and perceived exertion for the pectoralis major. Fourteen trained men (24.05 ± 4.17 yrs, 78.85 ± 3.51 kg, 175.42 ± 4.01 cm) underwent two different training sequences (SEQ1 and SEQ2). In SEQ1, all subjects performed 5 sets for maximal repetitions, with a 2-min rest interval, of the bench press followed by the machine chest fly with 10 repetitions maximum load. In SEQ2, the same procedures were repeated, but with the reverse order. The t-test did not show any differences (p = 0.140) in total workout repetitions between SEQ1 (62.22 ± 11.00 repetitions) and SEQ2 (55.40 ± 8.51 repetitions). Conversely, the total repetition number for the bench press exercise was significantly greater (p = 0.001) following SEQ1 (34.36 ± 4.68 repetitions) compared to SEQ2 (25.85 ± 6.73 repetitions). In contrast, the total repetition number for the machine chest fly exercise following SEQ2 was significantly greater (p = 0.001) (33.50 + 4.11 repetitions) compared to SEQ1 (27.85 ± 6.52 repetitions). Despite no significant differences found for the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) values between SEQ1 and SEQ2 for the barbell bench press in all sets (p ≥ 0.083), significantly higher RPE values for the machine chest fly were observed over the first three sets following SEQ1 compared to SEQ2 (p < 0.01). In conclusion, the total workout repetitions were not significantly different when performing the traditional multi- to single-joint or the reverse exercise order when training the pectoralis major muscle.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2478/hukin-2018-0059DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6458580PMC
March 2019

Effects of dance on the postural balance, cognition and functional autonomy of older adults.

Rev Bras Enferm 2018 ;71(suppl 5):2302-2309

Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Alfredo Pinto Nursing School. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Objective: to evaluate the postural balance, cognition and functional autonomy of older adults with dementia, who are long-stay inpatients, subjected to ballroom dancing.

Method: simple randomized clinical study. Older adult sample: control group (30) and experimental group (30). The groups were subjected to the protocol of functional autonomy for activities of daily living; to the assessment of cognition (mini-mental state examination); and to the analysis of postural balance (stabilometric and postural platforms). The analysis of variance with repeated measures for group and time factors, and Scheffé's post hoc test were used, with significance of p < 0.05.

Results: For the mini-mental state examination, the control group presented a 24.27 mean, and the experimental 22.75. Functional autonomy for activities of daily living - experimental: 54.47 ± 7.24 (p < 0.0001) x control: 61.77 ± 8.47 (p = 0.011). Postural balance - experimental: X = 3.16 ± 3.44 (p = 0.02) x control = X = 6.30 ± 7.62 (p = 0.04).

Conclusion: Ballroom dancing can be recommended for older adults to provide improvement in their balance and motor performance of the activities of daily living.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0034-7167-2017-0253DOI Listing
January 2019

Pain perception and low back pain functional disability after a 10-week core and mobility training program: A pilot study.

J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil 2018 ;31(4):637-643

Institute of Physical Education and Sports, Post-Graduation Program in Exercise and Sport Sciences, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Background And Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a 10-week core and mobility training program on pain perception and low back disability score in professors, students and employees of a university.

Methods: Twenty-four individuals of a university who previously reported pain and low back disability were randomly assigned to an experimental group (EG; n= 8) that received 2 weekly sessions of 50 minutes of core and mobility training for 10 weeks; or to a control group (CG; n= 16). Both groups received a guideline to adopt ergonomic postures during work and activities of daily living. The visual analog pain scale (VAS) and the Roland-Morris questionnaire (RMQ) were applied pre- and post intervention.

Results: Significant reductions in the pain intensity perception (p= 0.014) and low back functional disability (p= 0.011) were noted in the EG pre- and post measures. However, no significant difference was observed in the CG. Thus, there was a significant difference between the EG and the CG in the post-intervention measures (p= 0.001).

Conclusion: Core and mobility training and home-ergonomic instructions were effective to reduce the pain intensity perception and low back functional disability in the EG.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/BMR-169739DOI Listing
November 2018

Heavy vs Light Load Single-Joint Exercise Performance with Different Rest Intervals.

J Hum Kinet 2017 Sep 1;58:197-206. Epub 2017 Aug 1.

Nursing and Biosciences Post-Graduation Program (PPgEnfBio) - Doctorate of Federal University of State of Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO)RJ - Brazil.

The aim of the study was to compare the effect of three distinct rest period lengths between sets of upper body single-joint exercise with different load zones and volume designed for either endurance or hypertrophy (50% or 80% of 1-RM). Sixteen trained men (20.75 ± 2.54 years; 76.35 ± 5.03 kg; 176.75 ± 3.33 cm, 24.53 ± 1.47 kg/m2) performed a test and retest of 1-RM on non-consecutive days. Forty-eight hours after load testing, the participants were randomly assigned to six sessions consisting of four sets of the triceps pull-down, combining different intensities with distinct rest periods between sets. The shorter 1 minute rest promoted a significant reduction in the total repetition number compared to 3 minute rest for both workloads. There was a difference between 3 and 5 minute conditions for the 50% of 1-RM that did not occur for the 80% of 1-RM condition. Both intensities presented significant interaction values for the rest conditions vs. each set (50% p = 0.0001; 80% p = 0.0001). Additionally, significant values were found for the main effect of the performance of subsequent sets (50% p = 0.003; 80% p = 0.001) and rest conditions (50% p = 0.0001; 80% p = 0.0001). In conclusion, for heavier loads (80%) to fatigue, longer rest of 3 to 5 minutes seems to allow for better recovery between sets and thus, promotes a greater volume. However, when training with lighter loads (50%), the magnitude of the rest seems to directly affect the performance of subsequent sets, and also presents a correlation with total volume achieved for the upper body single-joint exercise scheme.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/hukin-2017-0077DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5548167PMC
September 2017

Resistance training programs on bone related variables and functional independence of postmenopausal women in pharmacological treatment: A randomized controlled trial.

Arch Gerontol Geriatr 2016 Jul-Aug;65:36-44. Epub 2016 Mar 3.

Federal State University of Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO/PPGEnfBio), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Introduction: Osteoporosis is a chronic disease that leads to bone fragility and is associated with fracture risks and serious consequences for mobility.

Objective: To verify the effects of two linear programs of resistance training (RT) on bone mineral density (BMD), functional autonomy (FA), muscular strength and quality of life (QoL) of postmenopausal women in pharmacological treatment.

Study Design: Randomized controlled trial, code: RBR-6bqsw8.

Methods: 52 volunteers were distributed into three groups, according to randomly parallel form: RT3times-per-week (RT3, n=20); RT2times-per-week (RT2, n=16) and control group (CG, n=16). The following assessment tools were used: bone mineral density (BMD) by dual X-ray absorptiometry, 'Latin America Group for maturity' (GDLAM) protocol for FA, 10RM test for leg exercises and the 'Osteoporosis Assessment Questionnaire' (OPAQ) for QoL. The physical activities were planned for 13 months in cycles with different intensities. A two-way ANOVA with Bonferroni post-hoc test were used.

Results: The results showed that the RT3/week was significantly more efficient (p<0.05) compared with RT2/week, including: All BMD variables, FA (Δ%=29.3%), leg press at 45° (Δ%=24.97%) and OPAQ (Δ%=20.23%). In addition, both RT3 and RT2 groups were more efficient (p<0.05) compared with CG, including: total BMD (Δ%=0.09%) and (Δ%=0.06%); FA (Δ%=7.1%) and RT2 (Δ%=3.78%); Leg press at 45° (Δ%=84.1%) and (Δ%=59.1%); keen extension (Δ%=15.28%) and (Δ%=20.37%); OPAQ (Δ%=57.61%) and (Δ%=37.37%), respectively.

Conclusion: The study showed that both experimental groups presented favorable results for BMD, strength, FA and QoL. However, the RT3 showed the best results compared to other groups after 13 months of intervention.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2016.02.010DOI Listing
July 2017

Effect of three months of periodized hydrogymnastics exercise program on urinary concentration of deoxypyridinoline in older women.

Arch Endocrinol Metab 2015 Dec;59(6):523-7

Laboratory of Human Motricity Biosciences, Federal University of State of Rio de Janeiro and Tiradentes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

Objective: To determine the effect of three months of periodized hydrogymnastics exercise program on urinary concentration of deoxypyridinoline in older women.

Subjects And Methods: Twenty-six subjects were randomly assigned in two, intervention group (n = 16) and control group (n = 10). The intervention group followed 12-week of periodized hydrogymnastics training program five times a week, 50 minutes of water exercise with work heart rate reserve of 40-50% (1-6th week) increasing the load to 50-60% (7-12th week); the control group was not involved in exercise and remained sedentary. The urinary concentration of deoxypyridinoline was evaluated by high resolution liquid chromatography using the reactive immulite pyrilinks-D siemens medical solutions, pretest at the baseline and at the end post-test of the 12-week of water-exercise. As statistical analyses mixed 2 x 2 ANOVA was used, also percentage changes (Δ %) was calculated.

Results: The results did not show significant improvement (p < 0.05) comparing the interaction intergroup and the measurements of urinary concentration of deoxypyridinoline (p = 0.504), percentage change (Δ %) showed positive improvements in the experimental group of -13.7 (nM/mMcreatine) in comparison with -7.1 (nM/mMcreatine) from the control group.

Conclusion: The present study involves periodization increasing the load heart rate reserve of hydrogymnastics exercise in order to produce grater adaptations, but the results showed than is not possible to infer that hydrogymnastics is effective in increase urinary concentration of deoxypyridinoline in older women, will be appropriated in the future more studies to better clarify the possibilities of improvements between hydrogymnastics and urinary concentration of deoxypyridinoline.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/2359-3997000000102DOI Listing
December 2015

Effect of periodized water exercise training program on functional autonomy in elderly women.

Nutr Hosp 2014 Dec 1;31(1):351-6. Epub 2014 Dec 1.

Laboratory of Human Motricity Biosciences, Federal University of State of Rio de Janeiro. Brazil..

Background: Scientific evidence have been related negative functional autonomy to sedentary lifestyle in elderly women by other hand physical exercise is highly recommended to prevent deterioration of neuromuscular functions and proposed during the rehabilitation of physical disability and fall accidents.

Aim: To determine the effect of periodized water exercise training on functional autonomy in elderly women.

Methods: Twenty-six subjects were randomly assigned in two, water exercise intervention group (n=16) and control group (n=10); The intervention group followed 12-week of periodized water exercise training program five times a week, 30 minutes of water exercise with work heart rate reserve of 40-50% (1-6th week) increasing the load to 50-60% (7-12th week); The protocol of the Group of Latin-American Development for Maturity (GDLAM) was used to evaluate functional autonomy; As statistical analyses mixed 2 x 2 ANOVA was used, also percentage changes (Δ %) were calculated.

Results: The results showed significant improvement (p<0.05) comparing the interaction intergroup and the measurements in 10 meters walk test (10mW) (p=0.001) and general GDLAM index (GI) (p=0.012), percentage changes (Δ %) showed positive improvements in the five components of (GDLAM) and (GI).

Conclusion: Periodized water exercise training program was able to enhance (10 mW) and (GI) however, will be appropriated in the future more studies to better clarify the possibilities of improvements between water exercise and functional autonomy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3305/nh.2015.31.1.7857DOI Listing
December 2014

[Impact of a music therapy program on the stress level of health professionals].

Rev Bras Enferm 2013 May-Jun;66(3):385-90

Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Escola de Enfermagem Alfredo Pinto, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Enfermagem e Biociências (Doutorando). Instituto D’Or de Pesquisa e Ensino, Hospital Barra D’Or. Rio de Janeiro-RJ, Brasil.

The study aimed to assess the effects of a music therapy program on the level of stress for female professionals working in a private hospital in Rio de Janeiro-RJ, Brazil. Thirty four female volunteers with 33.3 ± 8.5 years of age from different levels of professional participated in the study. We used the Lipp's inventory of symptoms of stress for adults (ISSL) to evaluate the level of stress of participants before and after music therapy. The program consisted of twelve sessions using the techniques of music therapy Improvisation and Musical Re-creation held once a week with 50 minutes / session in a period of three months. The Wilcoxon test for repeated measures was used for statistical analysis. The study showed a statistically significant decrease (Δ = - 60%, p <0.001) in the level of stress professionals studied after the music therapy program. In conclusion, the present study that the music therapy program was effective in decrease the level of stress of women health professionals working in a private hospital in Rio de Janeiro-RJ, Brazil.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0034-71672013000300013DOI Listing
July 2014

Comparison of functional autonomy with associated sociodemographic factors, lifestyle, chronic diseases (CD) and neuropsychiatric factors in elderly patients with or without the metabolic syndrome (MS).

Arch Gerontol Geriatr 2013 Sep-Oct;57(2):151-5. Epub 2013 May 10.

Federal University of Viçosa, Department of Nutrition and Health, Laboratory of Epidemiology, Av PH Rolfs, s/n, CCB-II, CEP: 36570-000 Viçosa, MG, Brazil.

The objective of this study was to compare autonomy and its associated factors in the elderly with and without MS. This study was a cross-sectional evaluation comprised of 402 subjects aged 60 years or older, of both sexes, consulting at the Family Health program, in Viçosa/MG. Autonomy was classified according to the Group of Latin American Development to Maturity (GDLAM) protocol and MS according to classification of the International Diabetes Federation. The independent variables were sociodemographic gender, age, marital status, education, those related to lifestyle including levels of physical activity and sedentary behavior, neuropsychological aspects included depressive symptoms, level of cognition and the presence of CD. A multiple linear regression model was used to estimate associations of variables with autonomy in the elderly with or without the MS. In the elderly group without MS, autonomy was associated with increasing age, sedentary behavior and depressive symptoms. In the group of elderly patients with MS, in addition to these factors, autonomy was also associated with being illiterate, not being physically active and presenting chronic illness. It was concluded that the presence of MS worsened the functional autonomy of elderly persons.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2013.04.005DOI Listing
February 2014

Validity and reproducibility of the sargent jump test in the assessment of explosive strength in soccer players.

J Hum Kinet 2012 Jun 4;33:115-21. Epub 2012 Jul 4.

Universidade do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO) - Laboratório de Biociências da Motricidade Humana (LABIMH) - Brazil.

The purpose of this study was to check the validity and the intra- and inter-evaluators reproducibility of the Sargent Jump Test, as an instrument of explosive strength measurement of soccer players of the sub-15 class. Forty-five soccer players were randomly selected from different clubs competing in the local soccer championship. All subjects performed one test on the same jump platform model Jumptest(®) (Hidrofit Ltda, Brazil) and two independent Sargent Jump Tests assessed by the same evaluator. Two days later, another Sargent Jump Test was performed simultaneously assessed by 2 evaluators. In all tests, three jumps were performed and the highest one was registered. In order to check the validity, the first Sargent Jump Test results were compared to those from the jump platform, considered the gold standard. To evaluate intra- and inter-evaluator reproducibility, results from the first, second and third Sargent Jump Tests were analyzed. The validity and reproducibility were evaluated by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), and by the Bland and Altman test (statistical pack SPSS 11.0), with a significance level set at p<0.05. The values found for validity (r=0.99, p=0.001), for intra-evaluator reproducibility (r=0.99, p=0.001) and for inter-evaluator reproducibility (r=1.0, p=0.001), permitted us to conclude that the Sargent Jump Test is a valid and reproducible instrument for measuring the explosive strength in homogeneous groups, such as those used in the present study.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2478/v10078-012-0050-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3588680PMC
June 2012

Extubation process in bed-ridden elderly intensive care patients receiving inspiratory muscle training: a randomized clinical trial.

Clin Interv Aging 2012 23;7:437-43. Epub 2012 Oct 23.

Laboratory of Human Kinetics Bioscience, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro State, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extubation process in bed-ridden elderly intensive care patients receiving inspiratory muscle training (IMT) and identify predictors of successful weaning.

Methods: Twenty-eight elderly intubated patients in an intensive care unit were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 14) that received conventional physiotherapy plus IMT with a Threshold IMT(®) device or to a control group (n = 14) that received only conventional physiotherapy. The experimental protocol for muscle training consisted of an initial load of 30% maximum inspiratory pressure, which was increased by 10% daily. The training was administered for 5 minutes, twice daily, 7 days a week, with supplemental oxygen from the beginning of weaning until extubation. Successful extubation was defined by the ventilation time measurement with noninvasive positive pressure. A vacuum manometer was used for measurement of maximum inspiratory pressure, and the patients' Tobin index values were measured using a ventilometer.

Results: The maximum inspiratory pressure increased significantly (by 7 cm H(2)O, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4-10), and the Tobin index decreased significantly (by 16 breaths/ min/L, 95% CI -26 to 6) in the experimental group compared with the control group. The Chi-squared distribution did not indicate a significant difference in weaning success between the groups (χ(2) = 1.47; P = 0.20). However, a comparison of noninvasive positive pressure time dependence indicated a significantly lower value for the experimental group (P = 0.0001; 95% CI 13.08-18.06). The receiver-operating characteristic curve showed an area beneath the curve of 0.877 ± 0.06 for the Tobin index and 0.845 ± 0.07 for maximum inspiratory pressure.

Conclusion: The IMT intervention significantly increased maximum inspiratory pressure and significantly reduced the Tobin index; both measures are considered to be good extubation indices. IMT was associated with a reduction in noninvasive positive pressure time in the experimental group.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S36937DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3484512PMC
February 2013

Degree of disability, pain levels, muscle strength, and electromyographic function in patients with Hansen's disease with common peroneal nerve damage.

Rev Soc Bras Med Trop 2012 Jun;45(3):375-9

Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Estadual do Piauí, Teresina, PI.

Introduction: This study evaluated the degree of disability, pain levels, muscle strength, and electromyographic function (RMS) in individuals with leprosy.

Methods: We assessed 29 individuals with leprosy showing common peroneal nerve damage and grade 1 or 2 disability who were referred for physiotherapeutic treatment, as well as a control group of 19 healthy participants without leprosy. All subjects underwent analyses of degree of disability, electromyographic tests, voluntary muscle force, and the Visual Analog Pain Scale.

Results: McNemar's test found higher levels of grade 2 of disability (Δ = 75.9%; p = 0.0001) among individuals with leprosy. The Mann-Whitney test showed greater pain levels (Δ = 5.0; p = 0.0001) in patients with leprosy who had less extension strength in the right and left extensor hallucis longus muscles (Δ = 1.28, p = 0.0001; Δ = 1.55, p = 0.0001, respectively) and dorsiflexion of the right and left feet (Δ = 1.24, p = 0.0001; Δ = 1.45, p = 0.0001, respectively) than control subjects. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the RMS score for dorsiflexion of the right (Δ = 181.66 m·s-2, p = 0.001) and left (Δ = 102.57m·s-2, p = 0.002) feet was lower in patients with leprosy than in control subjects, but intragroup comparisons showed no difference.

Conclusions: Leprosy had a negative influence on all of the study variables, indicating the need for immediate physiotherapeutic intervention in individuals with leprosy. This investigation opens perspectives for future studies that analyze leprosy treatment with physical therapeutic intervention.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0037-86822012000300018DOI Listing
June 2012

Arterial blood gas analysis in two different intra-hospital transport methods for postoperative cardiac surgery patients.

Rev Bras Ter Intensiva 2012 Jun;24(2):162-6

Objective: To evaluate the effects on blood gases by two methods of ventilation (with transport ventilation or self-inflating manual resuscitator) during intra-hospital transport of patients after cardiac surgery.

Methods: Observational, longitudinal, prospective, randomized study. Two samples of arterial blood were collected at the end of the surgery and another at the end of patient transport.

Results: We included 23 patients: 13 in the Group with transport ventilation and 10 in the Group with self-inflating manual resuscitator. Baseline characteristics were similar between both groups, except for higher acute severity of illness in the Group with transport ventilation. We observed significant differences in comparisons of percentage variations of gasometric data: pH (transport ventilation + 4% x MR -5%, p=0.007), PaCO2 (-8% x +13%, p=0.006), PaO2 (+47% x -34%, p=0.01) and SatO2 (+0.6% x -1.7%, p=0.001).

Conclusion: The use of mechanical ventilation results in fewer repercussions for blood gas analysis in the intra-hospital transport of cardiac surgery patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2012

The effectiveness of the Pilates method: reducing the degree of non-structural scoliosis, and improving flexibility and pain in female college students.

J Bodyw Mov Ther 2012 Apr 5;16(2):191-8. Epub 2012 Jan 5.

Programa de Investigación Biomédica, de la Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo, Uruguay.

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Pilates with regard to the degree of scoliosis, flexibility and pain.

Method: The study included 31 female students divided into two groups: a control group (CG = 11), which had no therapeutic intervention, and an experimental group (EG = 20), which underwent Pilates-based therapy. We used radiological goniometry measurements to assess the degree of scoliosis, standard goniometry measurements to determine the degree of flexibility and the scale of perceived pain using the Borg CR 10 to quantify the level of pain.

Results: The independent t test of the Cobb angle (t = - 2.317, p = 0.028), range of motion of trunk flexion (t = 3.088, p = 0.004) and pain (t = -2.478, p = 0.019) showed significant differences between the groups, with best values in the Pilates group. The dependent t test detected a significant decrease in the Cobb angle (Δ% = 38%, t = 6.115, p = 0.0001), a significant increase in trunk flexion (Δ% = 80%, t = -7.977, p = 0.0001) and a significant reduction in pain (Δ% = 60%, t = 7.102, p = 0.0001) in the EG. No significant difference in Cobb angle (t = 0.430, p = 0.676), trunk flexion, (t = 0.938p = 0.371) or pain (t = 0.896, p = 0.391) was found for the CG.

Conclusion: The Pilates group was better than control group. The Pilates method showed a reduction in the degree of non-structural scoliosis, increased flexibility and decreased pain.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbmt.2011.04.002DOI Listing
April 2012

Electromyography function, disability degree, and pain in leprosy patients undergoing neural mobilization treatment.

Rev Soc Bras Med Trop 2012 Feb;45(1):83-8

Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Estadual do Piauí, Teresina, PI.

Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the neural mobilization technique on electromyography function, disability degree, and pain in patients with leprosy.

Methods: A sample of 56 individuals with leprosy was randomized into an experimental group, composed of 29 individuals undergoing treatment with neural mobilization, and a control group of 27 individuals who underwent conventional treatment. In both groups, the lesions in the lower limbs were treated. In the treatment with neural mobilization, the procedure used was mobilization of the lumbosacral roots and sciatic nerve biased to the peroneal nerve that innervates the anterior tibial muscle, which was evaluated in the electromyography.

Results: Analysis of the electromyography function showed a significant increase (p<0.05) in the experimental group in both the right (Δ%=22.1, p=0.013) and the left anterior tibial muscles (Δ%=27.7, p=0.009), compared with the control group pre- and post-test. Analysis of the strength both in the movement of horizontal extension (Δ%right=11.7, p=0.003/Δ%left=27.4, p=0.002) and in the movement of back flexion (Δ%right=31.1; p=0.000/Δ%left=34.7, p=0.000) showed a significant increase (p<0.05) in both the right and the left segments when comparing the experimental group pre- and post-test. The experimental group showed a significant reduction (p=0.000) in pain perception and disability degree when the pre- and post-test were compared and when compared with the control group in the post-test.

Conclusions: Leprosy patients undergoing the technique of neural mobilization had an improvement in electromyography function and muscle strength, reducing disability degree and pain.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0037-86822012000100016DOI Listing
February 2012

Prevalence of lower back pain and physical inactivity: the impact of psychosocial factors in pregnant women served by the Family Health Strategy.

Einstein (Sao Paulo) 2011 Dec;9(4):489-93

Laboratory of Human Movement Biosciences - LABIMH, BR.

Objective: This study analyzed the impact of psychosocial factors on pregnant women with lower back pain and an associated lack of physical activity prior to pregnancy.

Methods: The sample included 66 pregnant women who were randomly selected from a total of 84 patients in the waiting rooms of the Family Health Units in Cuitegí, Paraíba, from September to November 2009. An epidemiological questionnaire adapted from the Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale was used for data collection. The questions about back pain, physical activity, and psychosocial factors were emphasized. SPSS 16.0 was used for the data analysis. The prevalence of lower back pain and its relationship to gestational age, habitual physical activity, and psychosocial factors were studied using the descriptive statistics and relative percentages in the SPSS Crosstabs procedure. The odds ratio and 95% confidence interval for lower back pain were calculated.

Results: The prevalence of lower back pain was 75%, which suggests that psychosocial factors were related to the presence of pain. Anxiety was reported in 42.8% of the women with lower back pain, and 38.7% of the women with lower back pain experienced physical fatigue at the end of the day. A higher percentage of pain (53%) was noted in the women who did not exercise prior to pregnancy.

Conclusion: Lower back pain prior to pregnancy is associated with lack of physical activity and with psychosocial factors in the Family Health Strategy patients of Cuitegí county.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1679-45082011AO2186DOI Listing
December 2011

Factors that contribute to low bone density in postmenopausal women in different amazonian communities.

Ther Adv Musculoskelet Dis 2011 Apr;3(2):81-90

São Paulo State University (UNESP)-Júlio de Mesquita Filho, São Paulo, Brazil.

Background: The aim of this study was to verify socioeconomic differences, nutrition, body balance and quality of life (QoL) in postmenopausal women with low bone mineral density (BMD) in two Amazonian communities.

Methods: A total of 42 female volunteers participated in the study. The volunteers were separated into two groups: Villa (n = 20; 53 ± 5.5 years) and City (n = 22; 56 ± 7.9 years). The following evaluation instruments were used: dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA); a socioeconomic questionnaire; a QoL questionnaire; a dietary habits questionnaire; and a balance test. Parametric and nonparametric tests were used.

Results: The data showed significant differences in socioeconomic level (Δ%=+15.9%, p = 0.000), lumbar spine L(2)-L(4) (Δ% = +0.10%, p = 0.007), balance (Δ% = +4.3%, p = 0.03) and some important aspects of nutrition, such as the consumption of milk (Δ%=+34%, p = 0.01) and alcohol (+14.8%, p = 0.0001). These significant differences also contributed to the total QoL score (Δ%=+76.2%, p = 0.000) and the majority of the QoL-related functions.

Conclusion: This study verified that socioeconomic level, nutritional status, physical activity levels and QoL can influence the BMD of postmenopausal women. The study suggests new strategies for official health organizations to use in order to prevent and treat osteoporosis. In addition, this study can provide an orientation to physical activity, nutrition and medical professionals.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1759720X11401674DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3382684PMC
April 2011

Aerobic conditioning, blood pressure (BP) and body mass index (BMI) of older participants of the Brazilian Family Health Program (FHP) after 16 weeks of guided physical activity.

Arch Gerontol Geriatr 2012 Jan-Feb;54(1):210-3. Epub 2011 Mar 9.

Laboratory of Exercise Physiology (LAFIEX) from Estácio de Sá University, Avenida Prefeito Dulcídio Cardoso, 2900, Rio de Janeiro 22680-100, RJ, Brazil.

Because physical exercise is an efficient means to improve maximum consumption of oxygen (VO(2max)) and reduce body fat, the objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of 4 months of a guided physical activity program on BMI, BP and estimated VO(2max) of older participants of the FHP. The sample was composed of 70 older participants who were divided into two groups: the experimental group (EG) (26 women and 9 men) and the control group (CG) (20 women and 15 men). The program of physical activity included walking, hydrogymnastics, weight-training exercises and stretching exercises. The intensity of the aerobics exercises was set such that participants would achieve 55-65% of the estimated maximum heart rate, with the corresponding effort to be subjectively rated by the participant as 12-13 points on a 6-20 point scale. After 4 months of guided physical activity, there was a significant 19.26% improvement in the VO(2max) in the EG (p ≤ 0.001), and the diastolic pressure in the EG was significantly lower than that in the CG (p ≤ 0.001). In conclusion, the 16-week program of physical activity significantly improved the cardiorespiratory capacity of older individuals.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2011.02.013DOI Listing
March 2012

[Respiratory muscle training programs: impact on the functional autonomy of the elderly].

Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) 2010 Nov-Dec;56(6):642-8

Universidade Castelo Branco, Rio de Janeiro, RJ.

Objective: To compare two respiratory muscle training programs for improving the functional autonomy of institutionalized elderly.

Methods: Clinical randomized trial conducted at a long stay institution with 42 elderly volunteers that were divided into three groups: Group ® Threshold (GT) with mean age (70.93 ± 8.41), Group Voldyne ® (GV) (70.54 ± 7.73) and Control Group (CG) (73.92 ± 7.28). Groups GT and GV were treated with breathing exercises and muscle training by Threshold and Voldyne, respectively while the CG did just breathing exercises. Training of groups took 10 weeks. To assess the functional autonomy, the elderly were evaluated before and after training, according to the GDLAM protocol.

Results: All intra-group comparison (pre x post-test) showed a significant difference in GT for all tests (C10M: Δ% = -20.57, p = 0.0001; LPS: Δ% = -13.53, p = 0.020; VTC: Δ% = -27.96, p = 0.0001; LCLC: Δ% = -18.71, p = 0.0001 and IG:% Δ = -18.43, p = 0.0001), except in LPDV. In GV there was a significant difference only (p <0.05) for the C10M (% Δ = -17.11, p = 0.004). In the comparison between (post x post), there was a statistical significance (p <0.05) for VTC test between the GT and GV (Δ = -3.62%, p = 0.017), with favorable results for the GT. Similarly, there was a statistical difference (p <0.05) in GT C10M (% Δ = -3.83, p = 0.023), LCLC (Δ = -34.02%, p = 0.012) and IG (Δ% = -13.63, p = 0.004) compared to GC.

Conclusion: The trained groups improved functional autonomy, reaching 27.42; considered to be a weak level in both pre-and post-training.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0104-42302010000600010DOI Listing
November 2011

Flexibility, functional autonomy and quality of life (QoL) in elderly yoga practitioners.

Arch Gerontol Geriatr 2011 Sep-Oct;53(2):158-62. Epub 2010 Dec 16.

Laboratory of Human Motricity Biosciences, LABIMH, Castelo Branco University, UCB, Av. Salvador Allende, n 6700, Recreio do Bandeirantes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ CEP 22780-160, Brazil.

The aim of this study was to assess the levels of flexibility, functional autonomy and QoL in elderly yoga practitioners. The subjects were divided into a yoga group (YG; n = 52; age = 66.79 ± 3.30 years; BMI = 24.77 ± 3.18) and control group (CG; n = 31; age = 69.33 ± 4.84 years; BMI = 24.32 ± 3.71) and submitted to flexibility tests through goniometry, the LADEG autonomy protocol and QoL, using the WHOQOL-Old questionnaire. Repeated measures ANOVA showed increases in articular range of motion in shoulder abduction (Δ%SA = 14.11%; p = 0.0001), horizontal shoulder extension (Δ%HSE = 33.90%; p = 0.0001), lumbar spine flexion (Δ%LSF = 50.74%; p = 0.0001), hip flexion (Δ%HF = 35.75%; p = 0.0001), hip extension (Δ%HE = 10.93%; p = 0.021) and knee flexion (Δ%KF = 3.90%; p = 0.001) and in the GDLAM autonomy index (Δ%AI = -13.67%; p = 0.0001) in the YG compared to the CG. The Mann-Whitney test revealed increases in QoL scores in Facet 1 (Δ%Fac1 = 9.04%; p=0.043), Facet 5 (Δ%Fac5 = 51.06%; p = 0.0001) and in overall QoL (Δ%OqoL = 8.13%; p = 0.046) in the YG compared to the CG. The remaining variables showed no significant intergroup modifications. Thus, the study suggests that the regular practice of yoga may lead to improved range of motion in the performance of activities of daily living in elderly women.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2010.10.028DOI Listing
December 2011

Inspiratory muscle training improves maximal inspiratory pressure and may assist weaning in older intubated patients: a randomised trial.

J Physiother 2010 ;56(3):171-7

University Federal do Estada do Rio de Janiero - LABIMH-UNIRIO, Brazil.

Questions: Does inspiratory muscle training improve maximal inspiratory pressure in intubated older people? Does it improve breathing pattern and time to wean from mechanical ventilation?

Design: Randomised trial with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat analysis.

Participants: 41 elderly, intubated adults who had been mechanically ventilated for at least 48 hr in an intensive care unit.

Intervention: The experimental group received usual care plus inspiratory muscle training using a threshold device, with an initial load of 30% of their maximal inspiratory pressure, increased by 10% (absolute) daily. Training was administered for 5 min, twice a day, 7 days a week from the commencement of weaning until extubation. The control group received usual care only.

Outcome Measures: The primary outcome was the change in maximal inspiratory pressure during the weaning period. Secondary outcomes were the weaning time (ie, from commencement of pressure support ventilation to successful extubation), and the index of Tobin (ie, respiratory rate divided by tidal volume during a 1-min spontaneous breathing trial).

Results: Maximal inspiratory pressure increased significantly more in the experimental group than in the control group (MD 7.6 cmH(2)0, 95% CI 5.8 to 9.4). The index of Tobin decreased significantly more in the experimental group than in the control group (MD 8.3 br/min/L, 95% CI 2.9 to 13.7). In those who did not die or receive a tracheostomy, time to weaning was significantly shorter in the experimental group than in the control group (MD 1.7 days, 95% CI 0.4 to 3.0).

Conclusions: In intubated older people, inspiratory muscle training improves maximal inspiratory pressure and the index of Tobin, with a reduced weaning time in some patients.

Trial Registration: NCT00922493.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1836-9553(10)70022-9DOI Listing
October 2010

Bone density, balance and quality of life of postmenopausal women taking alendronate participating in different physical activity programs.

Ther Adv Musculoskelet Dis 2010 Aug;2(4):175-85

LABIMH, Bioscience Laboratory of Human Movement, Castelo Branco University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Background: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of different physical activity (PA) programs on bone density, balance and quality of Life of postmenopausaL women taking concomitant aLendronate. A quasi-experimental study was conducted with 35 volunteers divided into four groups: practitioners of resistance training (RTG, n = 9, 49.8±4.2 years), judo (JUG, n= 11, 52.2 ±5.3 years), water aerobics (WAG, n = 8, 57.1 ±7.4 years) and the control group (CG, n = 7, 53.8±4.4 years).

Methods: The following assessment tools were used: bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry of the spine and proximal femur, the 'Osteoporosis Assessment Questionnaire' (OPAQ) and the 'Static Balance Test with Visual Control'. The physical activities were planned for 12 months in cycles with different intensities. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for analysis between groups, and a Scheffe post-hoc test was used for multiple comparisons.

Results: The multiple comparisons results showed that the RTG and JUG groups were significantly more efficient in the variables studied, including: Lumbar BMD (Δ% = 6.8%, p = 0.001), balance (Δ% = 21.4%, p = 0.01), OPAQ (Δ% = 9.1%, p = 0.005) and Lumbar BMD (Δ% = 6.4%, p = 0.003), balance (Δ% = U%, p = 0.02) and OPAQ (Δ% = 16.8%, p =0.000) compared with the CG. Furthermore, the RTG (Δ% = 4.8%, p =0.02) was significantly better than the WAG for the neck of femur BMD, and the JUG (Δ% = 16.8, p = 0.0003) also demonstrated superiority to the WAG in the OPAQ.

Conclusions: The physical activities studied appear to improve BMD, balance and quality of Life of postmenopausaL women taking a bisphosphonate. In this small sample, the RTG and the JUG groups were superior to the other groups.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1759720X10374677DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3383516PMC
August 2010

Effect of diet and indoor cycling on body composition and serum lipid.

Arq Bras Cardiol 2010 Aug 2;95(2):173-8. Epub 2010 Jul 2.

Universidade Castelo Branco, RJ.

Background: Indoor cycling is an aerobic exercise that employs large muscle groups of the lower limbs, lacking osteoarticular impact and high energy expenditure, which makes it interesting to generate a non-pharmacological strategy.

Objective: To assess body composition and lipid profile in overweight women after twelve weeks of low-calorie diet and indoor cycling training.

Methods: We randomly assigned 40 women (23.90 ± 3.10 years), divided into four groups: control (C), indoor cycling (CI), indoor cycling combined with low-calorie diet (CD) and low-calorie diet (D). The variables were: height and body mass, BMI, fat percentage, lean body mass, triglycerides, cholesterol and lipoproteins (HDL, LDL, VLDL). The indoor cycling training consisted of three weekly sessions of 45 minutes each and an energy restriction of about 1,200 kcal. The study lasted 12 weeks. We used descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation) and inferential statistics (Student's t test). The level of significance was p < 0.05.

Results: The groups CI, CD and D significantly reduced the mean anthropometric variables after 12 weeks of intervention (body mass, fat percentage and body mass index), and serum levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides. HDL cholesterol increased significantly for groups CI and CD.

Conclusion: According to the results, the indoor cycling and the low-calorie diet helped fight overweight and control serum lipids.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0066-782x2010005000080DOI Listing
August 2010

Correlation between static balance and functional autonomy in elderly women.

Arch Gerontol Geriatr 2011 Jan-Feb;52(1):111-4

Laboratory of Human Motricity Biosciences, Castelo Branco University, Av. Salvador Allende, n. 6700, Recreio do Bandeirantes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22780-160, Brazil.

The purpose of the present study was to verify the correlation between static balance and functional autonomy in elderly women. The sample was a random selection of 32 sedentary elderly women (mean age=67.47 ± 7.37 years, body mass index=BMI=27.30 ± 5.07 kg/m(2)), who live in the city of Teresina in the state of Piauí, Brazil. Static balance was analyzed by stabilometric assessment using an electronic baropodometer which measured the average of the amplitude of postural oscillations in the right (RLD) and left (LLD) lateral displacements, anterior (AD) and posterior (PD) displacements, and in the elliptical area (EA) formed by the body's center of gravity. Functional autonomy was evaluated by a battery of tests from the LADEG protocol which is composed of: a 10 m walk (10 mW), getting up from a seated position (GSP), getting up from the prone position (GPP), getting up from a chair and movement around the house (GCMH), and putting on and taking off a shirt (PTS). The Spearman's correlation coefficient (r) indicated a positive and significant correlation between GPP and LLD (r=0.382; p=0.031), GPP and PD (r=0.398; p=0.024) and GPP and EA (r=0.368; p=0.038). These results show that sedentary elderly women who spent the greatest amount of time performing the GPP test achieved the largest mean amplitude of displacement leading to greater levels of instability.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2010.02.011DOI Listing
March 2011

Pilates method in personal autonomy, static balance and quality of life of elderly females.

J Bodyw Mov Ther 2010 Apr 29;14(2):195-202. Epub 2010 Jan 29.

PROCIMH - Universidade Castelo Branco, RJ, Brasil.

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the Pilates method on the personal autonomy, static balance and quality of life in healthy elderly females.

Method: Fifty-two elderly females were selected and submitted to evaluation protocols to assess functional autonomy (GDLAM), static balance (Tinetti) and quality of life (WHOQOL-OLD). The Pilates group (PG: n=27) participated in Pilates exercises twice weekly for eight weeks. Descriptive statistics were compiled using the Shapiro-Wilk test. The level of significance was considered to be p< or =0.05.

Results: The dependent Student-t test demonstrated significant post-test differences in the Pilates group in the following areas balance (Delta%=4.35%, p=0.0001) and General Index of GDLAM (Delta%=-13.35%, p=0.0001); the Wilcoxon test demonstrated significant post-test differences in the quality of life Index (Delta%=1.26%, p=0.0411).

Conclusion: The Pilates method can offer significant improvement in personal autonomy, static balance and quality of life.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbmt.2009.12.005DOI Listing
April 2010

[Strength training, level of muscular strength and functional autonomy in a population of elderly women].

Rev Esp Geriatr Gerontol 2009 Sep-Oct;44(5):256-61. Epub 2009 Aug 25.

Universidad de A Coruña, UDC, España.

Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of muscular strengthening on the level of muscular strength in the neurogenic and myogenic phases and functional autonomy in a population of healthy, sedentary, elderly women.

Material And Methods: The sample was composed of 40 women, randomly divided into an experimental group (n=20; 65.62+/-5.36 years) and a control group (n=20; 71.45+/-5.72). A protocol of one repetition maximum (1 RM) was employed to evaluate muscular strength and the battery of tests included in the protocol of the Latin American Development Group for Maturity was used to evaluate functional autonomy. For the statistical analysis, the following tests were used: Kruskal-Wallis (experimental group in relation to three moments) followed by Dunn's multiple comparison test; Student's t-test for dependent samples (control group in relation to two moments) and the Mann-Whitney and Student's t-test for independent samples for Delta% (inter-group comparison).

Results: The results in the experimental group showed a significant increase in the myogenic phase in comparison with the pre-test (p-values: knee extension =0.0001; right knee flexion and left knee flexion=0.0001; straight supine=0.0001; triceps curl=0.0001. Functional autonomy tests showed significant improvements in the experimental group: neurogenic phase (p-values: general autonomy index=0.0089; walking 10 meters=0.0106; standing from a sitting position =0.0005; standing from a ventral decubitus position =0.0061; standing from a sitting position and walking around the house =0.0072; putting on and taking off a shirt =0.0104) and the myogenic phase (p-values: general autonomy index=0.0001; walking 10 meters=0.0005; standing from a sitting position =0.0000; standing from a ventral decubitus position =0.004; standing from a sitting position and walking around the house =0.0059; putting on and taking off a shirt =0.0003).

Conclusions: Thus, strength training only showed statistically significant differences in the myogenic phase; statistically significant reductions were also found in the time needed to perform functional autonomy tests in the neurogenic phase.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.regg.2009.04.005DOI Listing
January 2010

Is blood lactate removal during water immersed cycling faster than during cycling on land?

J Sports Sci Med 2007 1;6(2):188-92. Epub 2007 Jun 1.

University Castelo Branco , Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

The aim of the present study was to compare lactate removal during active recovery performed during cycling in water immersion (CW) and during cycling on land (CL), after a similar exercise bout in male adults. Eleven healthy and physically active men, aged between 20 and 26 years old participated in the experiment. Before the experimental tests, the ventilatory threshold of the subjects was determined. Each subject completed the experimental tests twice, with one week separating the two periods of experiment. The subjects exercised on the treadmill during 6 min at a speed 10% above the speed corresponding to their ventilatory threshold. Subsequently, the subjects recovered from the exercise bout either on a stationary bike (CL) or on a aquatic-specific bike (CW). On the subsequent week the subjects performed the same protocol but with a different recovery condition. Recovery condition assignment for the first test was counterbalanced (six subjects started with one condition and five with the other). Capillary blood samples were collected after each test and during the recovery period (at 3, 6, 9 and 15 minutes) and blood lactate was measured. The blood lactate values during CW were lower than during CL and significant differences were observed at the 6(th) minute (p ≤ 0.05) and at the 15(th) minute of recovery (p ≤ 0.05). Therefore, we may conclude that active recovery using cycling in water immersion may be more efficient than cycling on land for blood lactate removal. Key pointsPrevious studies have found positive effects of half liquid environment on blood lactate removal.However, few studies have compared lactate removal in half liquid and in dry land conditions with the use of stationary bikes.We have compared the lactate removal during active recovery on half-liquid cycling and active recovery on dry land cycling after a similar exercise bout in male adults.The blood lactate values during the recovery were lower after half-liquid cycling when compared with dry land cycling and significant differences were observed at the 6(th) minute and at the 15(th) minute of recovery.We may conclude that active recovery using half-liquid cycling may be more efficient than dry land cycling for blood lactate removal.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3786239PMC
October 2013
-->