Publications by authors named "Ertan Sarıbas"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Lung Transplantation for Cystic Fibrosis in Turkey: First Report.

Exp Clin Transplant 2021 Feb 17. Epub 2021 Feb 17.

From the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Kartal Kosuyolu Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Objectives: Lung transplant is the most important treatment approach that improves the life expectancy and quality of life for patients with cystic fibrosis with end-stage lung disease. In this study, we retros-pectively analyzed patients with cystic fibrosis who were referred to our lung transplant program in Turkey.

Materials And Methods: We evaluated 14 patients with cystic fibrosis who were referred to our lung transplant clinic between December 2016 and December 2019. The characteristics of the patients at the time of referral to our lung transplant clinic, survival, and lung transplant results were recorded.

Results: Four patients died on the wait list, 3 patients were not eligible for lung transplant, and lung transplant was performed in 7 patients. The mean age of all patients was 22.8 years (range, 11-41 years), and the mean age for patients who underwent lung transplant was 27.5 years (range, 21-41 years). The mean time of suitable donor offer or survival life was 140 days in the patients who were referred for lung transplant. The 1-year mortality rate was 28.6% (2 of 7 patients) after lung transplant. One patient died of chronic lung allograft dysfunction at the 25th month after lung transplant. Four patients were alive without any problems.

Conclusions: Lung transplant is the final treatment method for patients with cystic fibrosis with terminal period lung disease. To provide the best benefit, patients should be evaluated for transplant early. Cystic fibrosis care clinics and lung transplant clinics should work in coordination in order to increase the number of lung transplants and improve outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6002/ect.2020.0282DOI Listing
February 2021

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to lung transplantation in a Turkish lung transplantation program: our initial experience.

J Artif Organs 2021 Mar 27;24(1):36-43. Epub 2020 Aug 27.

Thoracic Surgery, Kartal Kosuyolu Training and Research Hospital, K Blok Cevizli, Kartal, Istanbul, Turkey.

Lung transplantation is a life-saving treatment for patients with end-stage lung disease. Although the number of lung transplants has increased over the years, the number of available donor lungs has not increased at the same rate, leading to the death of transplant candidates on waiting lists. In this paper, we presented our initial experience with the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as a bridge to lung transplantation. Between December 2016 and August 2018, we retrospectively reviewed the use of ECMO as a bridge to lung transplantation. Thirteen patients underwent preparative ECMO for bridging to lung transplantation, and seven patients successfully underwent bridging to lung transplantation. The average age of the patients was 45.7 years (range, 19-62 years). The ECMO support period lasted 3-55 days (mean, 18.7 days; median, 13 days). In seven patients, bridging to lung transplantation was performed successfully. The mean age of patients was 49.8 years (range 42-62). Bridging time was 3-55 days (mean, 19 days; median, 13 days). Two patients died in the early postoperative period. Five patients survived until discharge from the hospital. One-year survival was achieved in four patients. ECMO can be used safely for a long time to meet the physiological needs of critically ill patients. The use of ECMO as a bridge to lung transplantation is an acceptable treatment option to reduce the number of deaths on the waiting list. Despite the successful results achieved, this approach still involves risks and complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10047-020-01204-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7450232PMC
March 2021