Publications by authors named "Ernestina Etchemendy"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Stakeholders' views on online interventions to prevent common mental health disorders in adults implemented into existing healthcare systems in Europe.

Eur J Public Health 2021 07;31(31 Suppl 1):i55-i63

Ferdinand Porsche FernFH-Distance Learning University of Applied Sciences, Wiener Neustadt 2700, Austria.

Background: Online preventive interventions can help to reduce the incidence of mental disorders. Whereas knowledge on stakeholders' attitudes and factors relevant for successfully integrating online treatment into existing healthcare systems is available, knowledge is scarce for online prevention.

Methods: Stakeholders from Germany, Switzerland, Austria and Spain were surveyed. Potential facilitators/delivery staff (e.g. psychologists, psychotherapists) completed an online questionnaire (n = 183), policy makers (i.e. from the governing sector or health insurance providers) participated in semi-structured interviews (n = 16) and target groups/potential users of mental illness prevention (n = 49) participated in ten focus groups. Thematic analysis was used to identify their experiences with and attitudes and needs regarding online programmes to prevent mental disorders. Additionally, it was examined which groups they consider underserved and which factors they consider as fostering and hindering for reach, adoption, implementation and maintenance (cf. RE-AIM model) when integrating online prevention into existing healthcare systems.

Results: Main advantages of online mental illness prevention are perceived in low structural and psychological barriers. Lack of personal contact, security, privacy and trust concerns were discussed as disadvantages. Relevant needs are high usability and target group appropriateness, evidence for effectiveness and the use of motivational tools.

Conclusions: Positive attitudes among stakeholders are the key for successful integration of online mental illness prevention into existing healthcare systems. Potential facilitators/delivery staff must receive training and support to implement these programmes; the programmes must be attractive and continuously evaluated, updated and promoted to ensure ongoing reach; and existing infrastructure and contextual factors must be considered.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckab043DOI Listing
July 2021

Online interventions to prevent mental health problems implemented in school settings: the perspectives from key stakeholders in Austria and Spain.

Eur J Public Health 2021 07;31(31 Suppl 1):i71-i79

Ferdinand Porsche FernFH-Distance Learning University of Applied Sciences, Wiener Neustadt, Austria.

Background: Schools are key settings for delivering mental illness prevention in adolescents. Data on stakeholders' attitudes and factors relevant for the implementation of Internet-based prevention programmes are scarce.

Methods: Stakeholders in the school setting from Austria and Spain were consulted. Potential facilitators (e.g. teachers and school psychologists) completed an online questionnaire (N=50), policy makers (e.g. representatives of the ministry of education and health professional associations) participated in semi-structured interviews (N=9) and pupils (N=29, 14-19 years) participated in focus groups. Thematic analysis was used to identify experiences with, attitudes and needs towards Internet-based prevention programmes, underserved groups, as well as barriers and facilitators for reach, adoption, implementation and maintenance.

Results: Experiences with Internet-based prevention programmes were low across all stakeholder groups. Better reach of the target groups was seen as main advantage whereas lack of personal contact, privacy concerns, risk for misuse and potential stigmatization when implemented during school hours were regarded as disadvantages. Relevant needs towards Internet-based programmes involved attributes of the development process, general requirements for safety and performance, presentation of content, media/tools and contact options of online programmes. Positive attitudes of school staff, low effort for schools and compatibility to schools' curriculum were seen as key factors for successful adoption and implementation. A sound implementation of the programme in the school routine and continued improvement could facilitate maintenance of online prevention initiatives in schools.

Conclusions: Attitudes towards Internet-based mental illness prevention programmes in school settings are positive across all stakeholder groups. However, especially safety concerns have to be considered.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckab039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8266540PMC
July 2021

Online prevention programmes for university students: stakeholder perspectives from six European countries.

Eur J Public Health 2021 07;31(31 Suppl 1):i64-i70

King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK.

Background: Students beginning university are at a heightened risk for developing mental health disorders. Online prevention and early intervention programmes targeting mental health have the potential to reduce this risk, however, previous research has shown uptake to be rather poor. Understanding university stakeholders' (e.g. governing level and delivery staff [DS] and students) views and attitudes towards such online prevention programmes could help with their development, implementation and dissemination within university settings.

Methods: Semi-structured interviews, focus groups and online surveys were completed with staff at a governing level, university students and DS (i.e. student health or teaching staff) from six European countries. They were asked about their experiences with, and needs and attitudes towards, online prevention programmes, as well as the factors that influence the translation of these programmes into real-world settings. Results were analyzed using thematic analysis.

Results: Participating stakeholders knew little about online prevention programmes for university settings; however, they viewed them as acceptable. The main themes to emerge were the basic conditions and content of the programmes, the awareness and engagement, the resources needed, the usability and the responsibility and ongoing efforts to increase reach.

Conclusions: Overall, although these stakeholders had little knowledge about online prevention programmes, they were open to the idea of introducing them. They could see the potential benefits that these programmes might bring to a university setting as a whole and the individual students and staff members.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckab040DOI Listing
July 2021

Effect of an upright (vs. stooped) posture on interpretation bias, imagery, and emotions.

J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry 2020 09 12;68:101560. Epub 2020 Feb 12.

Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatment, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain; CIBER Fisiopatología Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN). Instituto Carlos III, Spain. Electronic address:

Background And Objectives: Adopting an upright (vs. stooped) posture has been related to positive effects on emotional and cognitive processes. However, there is no evidence concerning the effect of posture on two key processes associated with the maintenance of depression: interpretation bias and vividness of mental imagery. The objectives were to investigate the effect of adopting an upright (vs. stooped) posture on interpretation bias and vividness of positive and negative mental imagery, and to explore the interplay between these processes and depression-related emotions.

Methods: The sample consisted of 54 participants (M = 22.00, 64.8% women), who were randomly assigned to the upright or stooped condition. Participants answered self-report measures while they were adopting a specific posture. Posture was monitored through inertial technology.

Results: Main results were that: upright (vs. stooped) posture led to more positive interpretations of ambiguous information and increased positive emotions related to depression (happiness, optimism and vigor); time in an upright position was associated with change in interpretation bias and vividness of positive mental imagery; and level of depressive symptomatology moderated the effect of posture on the change in interpretation bias.

Limitations: Limitations are related to the use of non-clinical sample, the use of short-term measurements, and the lack of an experimental condition adopting the usual posture.

Conclusions: Posture interacts with mechanisms involved in the maintenance of depression, as well as with depression-related emotions. This study has clinical implications that should be continued explored in order to clarify the role of manipulating the posture in individuals with depressive symptomatology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbtep.2020.101560DOI Listing
September 2020

Qualitative analysis of the Best Possible Self intervention: Underlying mechanisms that influence its efficacy.

PLoS One 2019 17;14(5):e0216896. Epub 2019 May 17.

Department of Personality, Assessment and Psychological Treatments, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.

Background: The Best Possible Self is a Positive Psychology Intervention which asks participants to write down about themselves in their best possible future. Previous studies have shown its efficacy to enhance wellbeing, but the mechanisms that underlie its efficacy are still unknown.

Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the content of the essays of the BPS intervention and to examine how this content was related to the efficacy of the intervention to increase positive affect.

Method: Participants (N = 78) were randomized to either the Best Possible Self condition, or one of two variants of the intervention: one's best self in the present, and one's best self in the past. Qualitative analyses of the texts were carried out to explore the main themes and features of the essays. Then, a mixed-methods approach with quantitative and qualitative data was followed, in order to analyze the relationship between the content of the texts and the change in positive affect produced by the interventions.

Results: Significant differences between conditions were found in the content of the compositions. Regression analyses showed that different variables predicted the change in positive affect depending on the condition. Mediation analyses also found differences among conditions.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that these interventions respond to different underlying mechanisms which influence their efficacy. This study contributed to a better understanding of how Positive Psychology Interventions work, and how to increment their efficacy.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0216896PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6524817PMC
January 2020

Healthy Teens @ School: Evaluating and disseminating transdiagnostic preventive interventions for eating disorders and obesity for adolescents in school settings.

Internet Interv 2019 Apr 27;16:65-75. Epub 2018 Feb 27.

FernFH Distance Learning University of Applied Sciences, Wiener Neustadt, Austria.

Background: The worldwide prevalence of overweight and obesity is at alarming levels. Nearly one in three children in Europe is overweight or obese. Disordered eating and body image concerns are equally widespread and increase risk for more chronic and severe weight-related problems. Research has shown that online interventions that address both healthy weight regulation and body image can reduce risk for eating disorders and obesity simultaneously and are feasible to implement in school settings. To date, evaluation and dissemination of such programs in Europe is scant.

Methods: The study is a multi-country cluster-randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing the effectiveness of an unguided, online, multi-level intervention for promoting a healthy lifestyle and reducing problematic eating behavior, eating disorder and obesity risk among students aged 14 to 19 years with control condition. As part of the Horizon 2020 funded project ICare (GA No. 634757) the trial is conducted in Austria and Spain. Cluster randomization by school is used. The intervention is an adapted version of an evidence-based program developed in the USA (StayingFit). Participants of the intervention group are assigned to one of two possible program tracks based on the results of the initial online-assessment: Overweight adolescents are assigned to the "Weight Management" track emphasizing balanced eating and exercise for weight maintenance, and all other individuals are assigned to the "Healthy Habits" track which aims at promoting healthy habits related to e.g., nutrition, physical activity, sleep. The participants of both tracks work on ten modules (one 20-30 min module per week) during school hours and/or at home. Assessments are conducted at pre- and post-intervention, and at 6- and 12-months after baseline assessment. The primary outcome is intuitive eating, secondary outcomes are eating disorder symptomatology, body image concerns, body mass index, food intake, physical activity, self-esteem, stress coping, depression, and anxiety. Following the initial assessment, individuals in the control group do not have access to the prevention program but continue as normal and are only prompted to the assessments at all time points. At the end of the 12-month study they will get access to the program.

Discussion: The results from this study will add to the understanding of how to address eating and weight related problems in adolescents and will shed light on the feasibility of implementing online prevention programs in school routine in Austria and Spain. As part of the larger ICare project this RCT will determine how an adapted version of StayingFit is disseminated within Europe.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.invent.2018.02.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6364512PMC
April 2019

Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of guided and unguided internet- and mobile-based indicated transdiagnostic prevention of depression and anxiety (ICare Prevent): A three-armed randomized controlled trial in four European countries.

Internet Interv 2019 Apr 15;16:52-64. Epub 2018 Apr 15.

Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Nägelsbachstraße 25a, Germany.

Background: Depression and anxiety are highly prevalent and often co-occur. Several studies indicate the potential of disorder-specific psychological interventions for the prevention of each of these disorders. To treat comorbidity, transdiagnostic treatment concepts seem to be a promising approach, however, evidence for transdiagnostic concepts of prevention remains inconclusive. Internet- and mobile-based interventions (IMIs) may be an effective means to deliver psychological interventions on a large scale for the prevention of common mental disorders (CMDs) such as depression and anxiety. IMIs have been shown to be effective in treating CMDs, e.g. in reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety. However, there is a lack of studies examining the efficacy of interventions reducing the incidence of CMDs. Moreover, the comparative cost-effectiveness of guided versus unguided IMIs for the prevention of depression and anxiety has not been studied yet. Hence, this study aims at investigating the (cost-) effectiveness of guided and unguided internet- and mobile-based transdiagnostic individually tailored indicated prevention of depression and anxiety.

Methods: A multi-country three-armed randomized controlled trial will be conducted to compare a guided and unguided intervention to treatment as usual (TAU). Both active conditions are based on the same intervention, , and differ only with regard to guidance format. Altogether, 954 individuals with subclinical symptoms of depression (CES-D ≥ 16) and anxiety (GAD-7 ≥ 5) who do not have a full-blown disorder will be recruited in Germany, Switzerland, Spain and the Netherlands, and randomized to one of three conditions (guided intervention, unguided intervention, or TAU). The TAU arm will receive access to the training after a 12-month waiting period. The primary outcome will be time to CMD onset (any depression/anxiety disorder) within a follow-up period of 12 months after baseline. Secondary outcomes will include disorder-specific symptom severity (depression/anxiety) assessed by diagnostic raters blinded to intervention condition at post-intervention, self-reports, acceptability, health related quality of life, and psychosocial variables associated with developing a CMD. Assessments will take place at baseline, mid-intervention (5 weeks into the intervention), post-intervention (8 weeks after randomization) and follow-up (6 and 12 months after randomization). Data will be analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis and per protocol. Cost-effectiveness will be evaluated from a public health and a societal perspective, including both direct and indirect costs.

Discussion: The present study will further enhance the evidence-base for transdiagnostic preventive interventions and provide valuable information about optimal trade-off between treatment outcome and costs.

Trial Registration: German Clinical Trial Registration (DRKS - http://www.drks.de/drks_web/): DRKS00011099.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.invent.2018.04.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6364519PMC
April 2019

An Internet based intervention for improving resilience and coping strategies in university students: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

Internet Interv 2019 Apr 22;16:43-51. Epub 2018 Mar 22.

University Jaume, Castellón, Spain.

Background: The literature shows a high prevalence of depression and anxiety in young people. The university represents a change in the lives of students, and is considered a stress factor. Therefore, it is particularly relevant to develop interventions specifically addressed to students and foster supportive environments and resilient communities. As students are "digital natives", online interventions offer several potential advantages in doing this. This study aims to develop and evaluate the efficacy of an Internet-based intervention (CORE: Cultivating our Resilience), based on the Ryff model of well-being, to promote resilience and coping skills, decrease symptoms of depression and anxiety, and increase overall wellbeing in young people confronting a crucial life event (the university). This paper summarizes the study protocol.

Method: The design of the planned study is a randomized controlled trial. A minimum of 464 participants will be randomly assigned to two conditions: 1) an unguided Internet-based intervention to enhance resilience (N = 232); 2) a care-as-usual condition (CAU) (N = 232). The primary outcome will be the Connor-Davidson resilience scale. Secondary outcomes will - among others - include other relevant clinical measures, such as anxiety and depressive symptoms, quality of life, and social support. Outcomes will be assessed 4 and 8 weeks, and 6 and 12-months follow-ups. Intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses will be performed.

Discussion: The results of this study will contribute to the growing research on Internet-delivered interventions. The expected results may have a major impact on the prevention of mental disorders and possible negative consequences in at-risk populations, such as college students.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.invent.2018.03.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6364440PMC
April 2019

Expand your body when you look at yourself: The role of the posture in a mirror exposure task.

PLoS One 2018 23;13(3):e0194686. Epub 2018 Mar 23.

Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatment, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.

Mirror exposure (ME) is one of the main components of the treatment of patients with eating disorders symptomatology and it has shown its effectiveness in improving several outcomes (e.g., body dissatisfaction). However, the study as to what body posture should be adopted to maximize its effectiveness has been neglected. From embodied cognition and emotion theories, the adoption of an expansive (vs. contractive) body posture has been associated with positive changes in cognitive and emotional responses. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of adopting an expansive (vs. contractive) posture before an ME task on body-related emotions and cognitions, as well as to analyze the possible moderator and mediator variables of these relationships. The sample was composed of 68 women (age: M = 21.74, SD = 3.12) with high scores on body dissatisfaction. Participants were randomly assigned to the expansive or contractive condition, where the openness of the arms/legs and the back position were manipulated. Posture was monitored by an electronic device and participants filled out several self-reported measures. ANCOVAs, moderation, mediation, and moderated mediated analyses were performed. Results showed that women in the expansive condition showed higher positive emotions after the ME. Moreover, exploratory analyses showed that adopting an expansive posture improved positive emotions, leading to improvements in negative emotions, body image satisfaction, and appraisal of the person's own body. Psychological interventions should explore the value of holding an expansive posture before the ME in women with body dissatisfaction.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0194686PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5865731PMC
July 2018

Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a blended cognitive behavioral therapy for depression in Spanish primary health care: study protocol for a randomised non-inferiority trial.

BMC Psychiatry 2018 03 23;18(1):74. Epub 2018 Mar 23.

Department of Basic Psychology, Clinical and Psychobiology, Jaume I University, Castellón, Spain.

Background: Data from primary health care in Spain show a high prevalence of the major depressive disorder. Blended treatment (combination of face-to-face and online components) seems to be a very promising tool for the optimization and dissemination of psychological treatments in a cost-effective form. Although there is growing data that confirm the advantages of blended therapies, few studies have analyzed their application in regular clinical practice. The objective of the present paper is to describe the protocol for a clinical study aimed at exploring the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a blended cognitive behavioral therapy (b-CBT) for depression, compared to treatment as usual (TAU) in a primary health care setting.

Methods: A two-arm randomised controlled non-inferiority trial will be carried out, with repeated measures (baseline, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months) under two conditions: b-CBT and TAU. The b-CBT program will consist in three face-to-face sessions and eight online sessions. The TAU is defined as the routine care delivered by the general practitioner for the treatment of depression in primary care. The primary outcome is a symptomatic change of depressive symptoms on the patient-health questionnaire (PHQ-9). Other secondary outcomes will be considered (e.g., quality of life, treatment preference). All participants must be 18 years of age or older and meet the diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental disorders 4th edition. 156 participants will be recruited (78 per arm).

Discussion: It is expected that b-CBT is clinically non-inferior when compared to TAU. This is the first study in Spain to use a b-CBT format in primary and specialized care, and this format could be an efficacious and cost-effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of depression.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02361684. Registered on 8 January 2015. Currently recruiting participants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12888-018-1638-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5865366PMC
March 2018

Positive Technologies for Understanding and Promoting Positive Emotions.

Span J Psychol 2017 Oct 26;20:E50. Epub 2017 Oct 26.

University Jaume I (Spain).

Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) have become increasingly present in our lives, and their use has spread considerably. This paper presents a review of the way ICTs can help practitioners and researchers to study, promote, and train positive emotions. It is framed within the field of Positive Technologies: the applied scientific approach to the study of the use of technology to improve the quality of personal experience, with the goal of increasing wellbeing. First, the article presents an introduction to the topic of technologies and positive emotions. Then, it describes how ICTs can aid in monitoring, assessing, promoting, modifying, and training positive emotions. Finally, implications and future directions of the role of Positive Technologies in positive emotions are discussed. The authors conclude that, in the near future, Positive Technologies and the field of positive emotions will interact synergistically, producing an exponential growth in the understanding and promotion of positive emotions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/sjp.2017.42DOI Listing
October 2017

Effect of a web-based positive psychology intervention on prenatal well-being: A case series study.

Women Birth 2018 Feb 21;31(1):e1-e8. Epub 2017 Jun 21.

University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain; PROMOSAM Excellence in Research Program (PSI2014-56303-REDT), MINECO, Valencia, Spain.

Background: Detrimental effects of women's negative feelings during pregnancy have been extensively examined and documented, but research on the influence of positive feelings and protective factors on their prenatal mental health is scarce. Evidence from the positive psychology field has shown that practicing some brief positive exercises, called positive psychology interventions, can maximize well-being by increasing positive emotions, engagement, and meaning.

Aim: The aim of this study is to examine the effect of a positive psychology web-based intervention on indices of women's prenatal well-being.

Methods: Specifically, a case series design was adopted, and data from six women are presented. Participants were involved in a 5-week online positive psychology intervention that includes a set of positive psychology interventions specifically adapted for pregnant women. Measures of women's mental well-being, depression, pregnancy-related anxiety, life satisfaction, and social support were measured at pre- and post-intervention. Compliance with the intervention and exercise preferences were assessed at post-test. Single-item related well-being measures were assessed weekly.

Findings And Discussion: The findings of this case series study indicate potential effects of the intervention on supporting mental well-being and decreasing depressive symptomatology in these pregnant women. Furthermore, this study provides some suggestions for developing future online-based positive interventions addressed to pregnant women. However, these findings are preliminary, and future studies are needed in order to assess the effects of the intervention in a wider population of pregnant women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wombi.2017.06.005DOI Listing
February 2018

Online Positive Interventions to Promote Well-being and Resilience in the Adolescent Population: A Narrative Review.

Front Psychiatry 2017 30;8:10. Epub 2017 Jan 30.

CiberObn ISCIII, Valencia, Spain; Red de Excelencia PROMOSAM (PSI2014-56303-REDT), Madrid, Spain; Universitat Jaume I, Castelló, Spain.

Numerous studies have shown an alarming prevalence of depression, anxiety, and behavior disorders in youth. Thus, prevention of psychological problems in this population becomes crucial. According to the World Health Organization (1), prevention should also include the promotion and development of the individual's strengths in order to reduce vulnerability to suffering from mental disorders. In addition, other key elements of prevention are the reach, adoption, implementation, and maintenance of interventions. The information and communication technologies, especially the Internet, have much to offer in terms of the prevention and promotion of positive mental health in adolescents. This paper reviews these fields of research-prevention, positive psychology, Internet, and adolescents-and discusses the potential of positive interventions delivered over the Internet as effective and sustainable health promotion tools. The paper provides a brief description of the systems developed so far and a summary of selected features of the studies detected in the literature review. The overall conclusions are that there is a need for more controlled studies with long-term follow-ups, the interventions should be designed considering the specific features of the target users and the specific contexts where the interventions will be delivered, and they could be enhanced by the use of other technologies, such as smartphones, sensors, or social networks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2017.00010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5277019PMC
January 2017

Earth of Wellbeing: a place to live positive emotions.

Stud Health Technol Inform 2012 ;181:310-3

CIBER de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición, Spain.

EARTH of Wellbeing is a technological application to induce and train positive emotions and enhance different psychological strengths. The system contains 3 modules of activities: Park of Wellbeing, Wellbeing in the Nature and Book of Life. The objective of this paper is to describe the system and to offer data about its efficacy to induce positive affect in a sample of 30 participants who use EARTH three times a week along one month. This is a work in progress.
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January 2013

Psychometric properties of the questionnaire of sociocultural influences on the aesthetic body shape model (CIMEC-26) in female Spanish adolescents.

Eur Eat Disord Rev 2012 May 27;20(3):255-6. Epub 2012 Jan 27.

PREVI Clinical Center, Valencia, Spain.

The purpose of the present study was to analyse the psychometric properties of the 'Questionnaire of Sociocultural Influences on the Aesthetic Body Shape Model' (CIMEC-26) in a Spanish adolescent population. This questionnaire measures the influence of agents and situations that transmit the current aesthetic model, and assesses environmental influences favouring thinness. The CIMEC-26 was administered to a sample of 4031 female primary and secondary school students ranging in age from 10 to 17 years (M = 14, SD = 1.34). Results suggested that the CIMEC-26 has acceptable internal consistency (α = .93). The oldest group (15-17 years) had the highest scores on all factors and the highest total scores, suggesting greater influence of the aesthetic body shape model and higher vulnerability to social pressure to achieve it. Factor analysis suggested three moderately interrelated components of the scale. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that both the three-factor solution and the original five-factor structure had good fit indices, although the latter showed the best fit. The CIMEC-26 proved to be an effective instrument for research on the social influence on the aesthetic body model in female adolescents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/erv.2156DOI Listing
May 2012

An e-health system for the elderly (Butler Project): a pilot study on acceptance and satisfaction.

Cyberpsychol Behav 2009 Jun;12(3):255-62

Departamento de Psicología Básica, Clínica y Psicobiología, University Jaume I, Castellón, Spain.

The Butler Project is a technological e-health platform that uses the Internet to connect various users; it was designed to deliver health care to the elderly. The Butler platform has three levels of implementation: diagnosis (mood monitoring, alert system, management reports), therapy (training in inducing positive moods, memory work), and entertainment (e-mail, chat, video, photo albums, music, friend forums, accessibility to the Internet). The objective of this work is to describe the psychological aspects of the platform and to present data obtained from four users. Results show that after using the system, the participants increased their positive emotions and decreased their negative ones; in addition, they obtained high levels of satisfaction and experienced little difficulty in using the system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cpb.2008.0325DOI Listing
June 2009
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