Publications by authors named "Erin Magee"

5 Publications

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3D bioprinted scaffolds for diabetic wound-healing applications.

Drug Deliv Transl Res 2022 Jan 11. Epub 2022 Jan 11.

School of Pharmacy, Queen's University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast, BT9 7BL, UK.

The treatment strategy required for the effective healing of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is a complex process that is requiring several combined therapeutic approaches. As a result, there is a significant clinical and economic burden associated in treating DFU. Furthermore, these treatments are often unsuccessful, commonly resulting in lower-limb amputation. The use of drug-loaded scaffolds to treat DFU has previously been investigated using electrospinning and fused deposition modelling (FDM) 3D printing techniques; however, the rapidly evolving field of bioprinting is creating new opportunities for innovation within this research area. In this study, 3D-bioprinted scaffolds with different designs have been fabricated for the delivery of an antibiotic (levoflocixin) to DFU. The scaffolds were fully characterised by a variety of techniques (e.g. SEM, DSC/TGA, FTIR, and mechanical characterisation), demonstrating excellent mechanical properties and providing sustained drug release for 4 weeks. This proof of concept study demonstrates the innovative potential of bioprinting technologies in fabrication of antibiotic scaffolds for the treatment of DFU.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13346-022-01115-8DOI Listing
January 2022

Non-invasive, 3D printed, colourimetric, early wound-infection indicator.

Chem Commun (Camb) 2022 Jan 4;58(3):439-442. Epub 2022 Jan 4.

School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Queens University Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast, BT9 5AG, UK.

A simple, non-invasive, colour-based carbon dioxide (CO) indicator is described. The indicator provides an indirect response to the rapid, aerobic microbial colonisation of an underlying wound when used in conjunction with an occlusive ( sealed) dressing. The indicator has potential as an early warning indicator of infection in chronic wounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d1cc06147jDOI Listing
January 2022

Using a Collective Impact Framework to Implement Evidence-Based Strategies for Improving Maternal and Child Health Outcomes.

Health Promot Pract 2022 05 3;23(3):482-492. Epub 2021 Apr 3.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

In 2016, the North Carolina Division of Public Health launched the Improving Community Outcomes for Maternal and Child Health program to invest in evidence-based programs to address three aims: improve birth outcomes, reduce infant mortality, and improve health outcomes for children 0 to 5 years old. Five grantees representing 14 counties were awarded 2 years of funding to implement one evidence-based strategy per aim using a collective impact framework, the principles of implementation science, and a health equity approach. Local health departments served as the backbone organization and provided ongoing support to grantees and helped them form community action teams (CATs) comprising implementation team members, community experts, and relevant stakeholders who met regularly. Focus groups with each grantee's CAT were held during 2017 and 2019 to explore how CATs used a collective impact framework to implement their chosen evidence-based strategies. Results show that grantees made the most progress engaging diverse sectors in implementing a common agenda, continuous communication, and mutually reinforcing activities. Overall, grantees struggled with a shared measurement system but found that a formal tool to assess equity helped use data to drive decision making and program adaptations. Grantees faced logistical challenges holding regular CAT meetings and sustaining community expert engagement. Overtime, CATs cultivated community partnerships and multicounty collaboratives viewed cross-county knowledge sharing as an asset. Future collective impact initiatives should allow grantees more time upfront to form their CAT to plan for sustained community engagement before implementing programs and to incorporate a tool to center equity in their work.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1524839921998806DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9096576PMC
May 2022

Starting the Conversation: Are Campus Sexual Assault Policies Related to the Prevalence of Campus Sexual Assault?

J Interpers Violence 2018 11;33(21):3315-3343

1 The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

One goal of university campus sexual assault (CSA) policies is to help prevent CSA. Federal guidance in the 2014 White House Task Force to Protect Students From Sexual Assault Checklist for Campus Sexual Misconduct Policies suggests 10 elements for inclusion in CSA policies (e.g., Policy Introduction, Grievance/Adjudication), and outlines policy topics to be included within each element (Policy Introduction includes two topics: statement of prohibition against sex discrimination including sexual misconduct and statement of commitment to address sexual misconduct). However, no research has examined whether CSA policies impact CSA prevalence. To begin addressing this gap, we studied 24 universities participating in the 2015 Association of American Universities Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct. We linked 2014-2015 data from these universities' CSA policies and their CSA prevalence findings from the 2015 Association of American Universities (AAU) survey. To test whether the comprehensiveness of schools' CSA policies was related to schools' CSA prevalence, we examined the degree to which the CSA policies included recommended policy content from the aforementioned Checklist. Policies were characterized as more comprehensive if they included greater numbers of Checklist topics. We then correlated the number of topics within the policies with school-level CSA prevalence. We also explored whether there was lower CSA prevalence among schools with policies containing particular topics. Results suggested that greater comprehensiveness of schools' entire CSA policies was negatively correlated with CSA prevalence; however, these findings did not approach statistical significance. The number of negative correlations observed between schools' CSA policy elements and CSA prevalence among undergraduate women was greater than expected by chance alone, suggesting a possible connection between comprehensive CSA policies and CSA prevalence. Schools with policies that included a topic on their sexual assault response team had the lowest CSA prevalence for both women and men, and schools that included topics describing grievance/adjudication procedures had lower CSA prevalence. This study provides a novel examination of CSA and could inform needed research related to the impact of CSA policies on CSA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0886260518798352DOI Listing
November 2018

Young Mothers' and Fathers' Perceptions of Relationship Violence: A Focus Group Study.

Violence Against Women 2019 03 2;25(3):274-296. Epub 2018 Aug 2.

1 University of Delaware, Newark, USA.

Teens and young adults who are pregnant or parenting are important targets for efforts to prevent intimate partner violence (IPV). To intervene appropriately and effectively, we need to fully understand the unique issues and contexts for IPV in this population. This focus group study examined young parents' ( N = 28) perceptions of their relationships, stressors and sources of conflict, forms of IPV, and help-seeking behaviors. We examined data using template, content, thematic, and framework analyses. Findings about relationships and violence between young parents provide valuable insights for future intervention programs designed to prevent or address IPV among teen parents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1077801218780356DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6824585PMC
March 2019
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