Publications by authors named "Erika Buscardo"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Spatio-temporal dynamics of soil bacterial communities as a function of Amazon forest phenology.

Sci Rep 2018 03 12;8(1):4382. Epub 2018 Mar 12.

Department of Plant Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.

Most tropical evergreen rain forests are characterised by varying degrees of precipitation seasonality that influence plant phenology and litterfall dynamics. Soil microbes are sensitive to soil water:air ratio and to nutrient availability. We studied if within-year seasonality in precipitation and litterfall-derived nutrient input resulted in predictable seasonal variation in soil bacterial diversity/microbial functional groups in an Amazonian forest. We characterised the spatio-temporal dynamics of microbial communities from the plot to the stand scales and related them to precipitation seasonality and spatial variability in soil characteristics. Community composition and functional diversity showed high spatial heterogeneity and was related to variability in soil chemistry at the stand level. Large species turnover characterised plot level changes over time, reflecting precipitation seasonality-related changes in soil nutrient and moisture regimes. The abundance of decomposers was highest during the rainy season, characterised also by anaerobic saprophytes and N-fixers adapted to fluctuating redox conditions. In contrast, Beijerinckiaceae, likely derived from the phyllosphere, were found at higher abundances when litter inputs and accumulation were highest. We showed that in a mildly seasonal rain forest, the composition of soil microbial communities appears to be following canopy phenology patterns and the two are interlinked and drive soil nutrient availability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-22380-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5847513PMC
March 2018

The database of the PREDICTS (Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems) project.

Ecol Evol 2017 01 16;7(1):145-188. Epub 2016 Dec 16.

Imperial College London South Kensington London UK.

The PREDICTS project-Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)-has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used this evidence base to develop global and regional statistical models of how local biodiversity responds to these measures. We describe and make freely available this 2016 release of the database, containing more than 3.2 million records sampled at over 26,000 locations and representing over 47,000 species. We outline how the database can help in answering a range of questions in ecology and conservation biology. To our knowledge, this is the largest and most geographically and taxonomically representative database of spatial comparisons of biodiversity that has been collated to date; it will be useful to researchers and international efforts wishing to model and understand the global status of biodiversity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2579DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5215197PMC
January 2017

The PREDICTS database: a global database of how local terrestrial biodiversity responds to human impacts.

Ecol Evol 2014 Dec 2;4(24):4701-35. Epub 2014 Dec 2.

Museo de Zoología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México México D.F, Mexico ; Colección de Tejidos, Instituto de Investigación de Recursos Biológicos Alexander von Humboldt Km 17 Cali-Palmira, Valle del Cauca, Colombia.

Biodiversity continues to decline in the face of increasing anthropogenic pressures such as habitat destruction, exploitation, pollution and introduction of alien species. Existing global databases of species' threat status or population time series are dominated by charismatic species. The collation of datasets with broad taxonomic and biogeographic extents, and that support computation of a range of biodiversity indicators, is necessary to enable better understanding of historical declines and to project - and avert - future declines. We describe and assess a new database of more than 1.6 million samples from 78 countries representing over 28,000 species, collated from existing spatial comparisons of local-scale biodiversity exposed to different intensities and types of anthropogenic pressures, from terrestrial sites around the world. The database contains measurements taken in 208 (of 814) ecoregions, 13 (of 14) biomes, 25 (of 35) biodiversity hotspots and 16 (of 17) megadiverse countries. The database contains more than 1% of the total number of all species described, and more than 1% of the described species within many taxonomic groups - including flowering plants, gymnosperms, birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, beetles, lepidopterans and hymenopterans. The dataset, which is still being added to, is therefore already considerably larger and more representative than those used by previous quantitative models of biodiversity trends and responses. The database is being assembled as part of the PREDICTS project (Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems - http://www.predicts.org.uk). We make site-level summary data available alongside this article. The full database will be publicly available in 2015.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.1303DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4278822PMC
December 2014

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities along a pedo-hydrological gradient in a Central Amazonian terra firme forest.

Mycorrhiza 2014 Jan 11;24(1):21-32. Epub 2013 Jun 11.

Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia (INPA), Coordenação de Biodiversidade (CBIO), Av. Efigênio Sales, 2239, Campus III CP 478, CEP 69011-970, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.

Little attention has been paid to plant mutualistic interactions in the Amazon rainforest, and the general pattern of occurrence and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in these ecosystems is largely unknown. This study investigated AMF communities through their spores in soil in a 'terra firme forest' in Central Amazonia. The contribution played by abiotic factors and plant host species identity in regulating the composition, abundance and diversity of such communities along a topographic gradient with different soils and hydrology was also evaluated. Forty-one spore morphotypes were observed with species belonging to the genera Glomus and Acaulospora, representing 44 % of the total taxa. Soil texture and moisture, together with host identity, were predominant factors responsible for shaping AMF communities along the pedo-hydrological gradient. However, the variability within AMF communities was largely associated with shifts in the relative abundance of spores rather than changes in species composition, confirming that common AMF species are widely distributed in plant communities and all plants recruited into the forest are likely to be exposed to the dominant sporulating AMF species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00572-013-0507-xDOI Listing
January 2014

Effect of root age on the allocation of metals, amino acids and sugars in different cell fractions of the perennial grass Paspalum notatum (bahiagrass).

Plant Physiol Biochem 2011 Dec 28;49(12):1442-7. Epub 2011 Sep 28.

Centro de Ecologia Funcional, Departamento de Ciências da Vida, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade de Coimbra, Apartado 3046, 3001-401 Coimbra, Portugal.

This work aimed to compare the allocation of Al, Fe, Cu, Ni, amino acids and sugars in different fractions of root cells of Paspalum notatum with 21 and 120 days old grown in quartz sand. In general younger roots showed a higher content of Al, Fe, Cu Ni, amino acids and sugars, compared to older roots. This can be due to a higher metabolic activity of younger roots and/or to structural changes that can occur with cell ageing. Al and Fe were mainly allocated to fractions with pectin, hemicellulose and cellulose, both in younger and older roots. However, older roots also showed a significant fraction of Al allocated to the intracellular fraction. It seems that older roots were less able to prevent the entry of Al in the cytoplasm. The proportion of Cu was higher in intracellular components, both in younger and older roots, as expected from an essential nutrient. Ni content was very low in older roots and in younger roots it was mainly allocated to the intracellular fraction and to the cell wall polysaccharides fraction. The amino acids were mainly allocated to the cytoplasm and polysaccharide fraction. Although younger roots showed a higher total amount of amino acids compared to older roots, the amino acids profile and allocation, mainly in the cytoplasm polysaccharides, was quite similar. Arabinose, a major component of structural glycoproteins of the primary cell wall matrix, was only detected in younger roots. Thus, it seems that root cells of P. notatum suffered changes in the composition of the cell wall components with ageing. To further understand the structural changes of root cells with ageing and its effect on metal allocation, it is important to quantify several components of the cell wall matrix, namely pectins and glycoproteins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.plaphy.2011.09.010DOI Listing
December 2011

Common environmental factors explain both ectomycorrhizal species diversity and pine regeneration variability in a post-fire Mediterranean forest.

Mycorrhiza 2011 Aug 8;21(6):549-558. Epub 2011 Feb 8.

Department of Forest Environment and Resources, DISAFRI, University of Tuscia, via San Camillo de Lellis, 01100, Viterbo, Italy.

Natural seedling regeneration and establishment after stand replacing wildfires is influenced by a series of environmental and biological constraints. In this study, we characterized the diversity and structure of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal community associated with post-fire naturally regenerated maritime pine saplings, and individuate the environmental factors responsible for fungal species distribution. We also identify the main environmental factors responsible for maritime pine regeneration variability and assessed the relation between saplings performance and ECM fungal diversity indices. Fungal species were identified by direct sequencing of internal transcribed spacer regions. Five years after the disturbance event, a total of 30 taxa colonized the pine saplings. The ECM fungal community was dominated by ruderal species of the genus Rhizopogon (present in almost half of the samples). Almost one third of the identified ECM fungal species belonged to the family Thelephoraceae. Typical k-selected species like Amanita pantherina, Boletus aestivalis, Lactarius chrysorrheus, and Russula densifolia were found on pine saplings collected in proximity of unburnt pine trees, in correspondence with low erosion extents. Pine regeneration varied throughout the study areas and was enhanced at higher elevations, in correspondence with moderate slopes, shallower soils, and a reduced cover of ericaceous shrubs and bare ground. These conditions were found in close proximity to patches of pine trees that survived the disturbance event and were previously characterized by a higher pre-fire pine biomass. Even though no correlations were found between saplings performance and ECM fungal diversity indices, common environmental factors (i.e., ericaceous shrub cover, extent of erosion, slope, and soil depth) were responsible for shaping the ECM fungal distribution and for describing most of the explained regeneration variability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00572-011-0363-5DOI Listing
August 2011

Impact of wildfire return interval on the ectomycorrhizal resistant propagules communities of a Mediterranean open forest.

Fungal Biol 2010 Aug 21;114(8):628-36. Epub 2010 May 21.

Centre for Functional Ecology, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, 3001-401 Coimbra, Portugal.

Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, in particular their spores and other resistant propagules, play an important role in secondary succession processes that facilitate regeneration after disturbance events. In this study, the effects of high and low wildfire frequencies (respectively short and long fire return intervals) on the resistant propagules communities (RPCs) of a Mediterranean open pine forest were compared. Soil samples were collected in four mountain sites with different fire return intervals and used to test ectomycorrhiza development in two hosts, Pinus pinaster and Quercus suber. RPCs were characterized by direct sequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions from individual ECM root tips. Eighteen ECM species were detected in the bioassay. The most frequently found fungi were Cenococcum geophilum, Inocybe jacobi, Thelephora terrestris, Tomentella ellisii on both hosts and Rhizopogon luteolus and R. roseolus on maritime pine. A short fire return interval reduced the species richness of the ECM community found on Q. suber, promoted species like R. roseolus and reduced the abundance of other species (e.g. R. luteolus). The abundance of I. jacobi was positively affected by long fire return interval, but decreased significantly with recurrent fires. These results indicate that changes in fire frequency can alter the structure, composition and diversity of ECM communities, which could compromise the resilience of the ecosystem in highly disturbed areas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.funbio.2010.05.004DOI Listing
August 2010

Response of birds to climatic variability; evidence from the western fringe of Europe.

Int J Biometeorol 2009 May 6;53(3):211-20. Epub 2009 Feb 6.

Department of Botany, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.

Ireland's geographic location on the western fringe of the European continent, together with its island status and impoverished avifauna, provides a unique opportunity to observe changes in bird migration and distribution patterns in response to changing climatic conditions. Spring temperatures have increased in western Europe over the past 30 years in line with reported global warming. These have been shown, at least in part, to be responsible for changes in the timing of life cycle events (phenology) of plants and animals. In order to investigate the response of bird species in Ireland to changes in temperature, we examined ornithological records of trans-Saharan migrants over the 31-year period 1969-1999. Analysis of the data revealed that two discrete climatic phenomena produced different responses in summer migrant bird species. Firstly, a number of long-distance migrants showed a significant trend towards earlier arrival. This trend was evident in some species and was found to be a response to increasing spring air temperature particularly in the month of March. Secondly, (1) a step change in the pattern of occurrences of non-breeding migrant bird species, and (2) an increase in the ringing data of migrant species were found to correlate with a step change in temperature in 1987-1988. These results indicate that, for migrant bird species, the impact of a sudden change in temperature can be as important as any long-term monotonic trend, and we suggest that the impact of step change events merits further investigation on a wider range of species and across a greater geographical range.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00484-009-0206-7DOI Listing
May 2009
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