Publications by authors named "Erica Rossi"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A case of pericarditis caused by Mycoplasma hyorhinis in a weaned piglet.

Porcine Health Manag 2021 Apr 12;7(1):32. Epub 2021 Apr 12.

Peripheral Diagnostic Laboratory of Pordenone, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Cordenons, PN, Italy.

Background: Mycoplasma hyorhinis (M. hyorhinis) is a bacterium commonly found in the upper respiratory tract of healthy pigs and an agent of polyserositis and polyarthritis. Moreover, it can carry antibiotic resistance genes (Wu et al, Vet. Microbiol. 76: 25-30, 2000). Economic losses caused by M. hyorhinis can be reduced by antibiotic therapy, however, isolation and antimicrobic susceptibility profile are rarely performed.

Case Presentation: The present report describes a case of pericarditis caused by M. hyorhinis in a weaned piglet with respiratory symptoms and reduced growth performance. At post mortem examination, the main macroscopic finding was a severe fibrinous pericarditis and M. hyorhins was the only agent isolated from the pericardial fluid. In this strain, Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) determination revealed resistance to various antimicrobial molecules such as erythromycin, tylosin and tilmicosin.

Conclusion: This paper highlights the importance of including M. hyorhins in the differential diagnosis of polyserositis in swine. Moreover, due the possible presence of multidrug resistance, the determination of antimicrobial susceptibility pattern should be performed on a regular basis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40813-021-00211-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8040207PMC
April 2021

Blood SIRT1 Shows a Coherent Association with Leptin and Adiponectin in Relation to the Degree and Distribution of Adiposity: A Study in Obesity, Normal Weight and Anorexia Nervosa.

Nutrients 2020 Nov 14;12(11). Epub 2020 Nov 14.

Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Medical Physiopathology, Food Science and Endocrinology, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a sensor of cell energy availability, and with leptin and adiponectin, it regulates metabolic homeostasis. Widely studied in tissues, SIRT1 is under evaluation as a plasmatic marker. We aimed at assessing whether circulating SIRT1 behaves consistently with leptin and adiponectin in conditions of deficiency, excess or normal fat content. Eighty subjects were evaluated: 27 with anorexia nervosa (AN), 26 normal-weight and 27 with obesity. Bloodstream SIRT1, leptin and adiponectin (ELISA), total and trunk fat mass (FM) %, abdominal visceral adipose tissue, liver steatosis and epicardial fat thickness (EFT) were assessed. For each fat store, the coefficient of determination (R) was used to evaluate the prediction capability of SIRT1, leptin and adiponectin. Plasma SIRT1 and adiponectin coherently decreased with the increase of FM, while the opposite occurred with leptin. Mean levels of each analyte were different between groups ( < 0.005). A significant association between plasma variables and FM depots was observed. SIRT1 showed a good predictive strength for FM, particularly in the obesity group, where the best R was recorded for EFT (R = 0.7). Blood SIRT1, adiponectin and leptin behave coherently with FM and there is synchrony between them. The association of SIRT1 with FM is substantially superimposable to that of adiponectin and leptin. Given its homeostatic roles, SIRT1 may deserve to be considered as a plasma clinical/biochemical parameter of adiposity and metabolic health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu12113506DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7696683PMC
November 2020

Micro-CT based finite element models for elastic properties of glass-ceramic scaffolds.

J Mech Behav Biomed Mater 2017 01 23;65:248-255. Epub 2016 Aug 23.

Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering, Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics (LaBS) - Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano, Italy; I.R.C.C.S., Via R. Galeazzi 4, 20161 Milano, Italy. Electronic address:

In this study, the mechanical properties of porous glass-ceramic scaffolds are investigated by means of three-dimensional finite element models based on micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scan data. In particular, the quantitative relationship between the morpho-architectural features of the obtained scaffolds, such as macroscopic porosity and strut thickness, and elastic properties, is sought. The macroscopic elastic properties of the scaffolds have been obtained through numerical homogenization approaches using the mechanical characteristics of the solid walls of the scaffolds (assessed through nanoindentation) as input parameters for the numerical simulations. Anisotropic mechanical properties of the produced scaffolds have also been investigated by defining a suitable anisotropy index. A comparison with morphological data obtained through the micro-CT scans is also presented. The proposed study shows that the produced glass-ceramic scaffolds exhibited a macroscopic porosity ranging between 29% and 97% which corresponds to an average stiffness ranging between 42.4GPa and 36MPa. A quantitative estimation of the isotropy of the macroscopic elastic properties has been performed showing that the samples with higher solid fractions were those closest to an isotropic material.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2016.08.020DOI Listing
January 2017

Differential biohydrogenation and isomerization of [U-(13)C]oleic and [1-(13)C]oleic acids by mixed ruminal microbes.

Lipids 2006 May;41(5):513-7

Department of Animal and Veterinary Science, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844-2330, USA.

The additional mass associated with 13C in metabolic tracers may interfere with their metabolism. The comparative isomerization and biohydrogenation of oleic, [1-(13)C]oleic, and [U-13C]oleic acids by mixed ruminal microbes was used to evaluate this effect. The percent of stearic, cis-14 and -15, and trans-9 to -16 18:1 originating from oleic acid was decreased for [U-(13)C]oleic acid compared with [1-(13)C]oleic acid. Conversely, microbial utilization of [U-(13)C]oleic acid resulted in more of the 13C label in cis-9 18:1 compared with [1-(13)C]oleic acid (53.7 vs. 40.1%). The isomerization and biohydrogenation of oleic acid by ruminal microbes is affected by the mass of the labeled tracer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11745-006-5125-3DOI Listing
May 2006
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