Publications by authors named "Erica Lay"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Acute Strokelike Presentation and Long-term Evolution of Diffusion Restriction Pattern in Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy.

J Child Neurol 2021 Apr 26:8830738211006507. Epub 2021 Apr 26.

Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.

Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is a rare autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder caused by pathogenic biallelic variants in the gene. The phenotype of this disease has been attributed to deficiency in the mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase leading to many downstream effects. Ethylmalonic encephalopathy classically presents with developmental regression, petechiae, acrocyanosis, and chronic diarrhea. The neurologic phenotype includes hypotonia, spastic diplegia, ataxia, and developmental delay. As more patients with this condition are described, the neurologic phenotype continues to expand. Although strokelike episodes or metabolic strokes have been studied in other mitochondrial disorders, they have not been thoroughly reported in this disorder. Herein, we describe 3 patients with ethylmalonic encephalopathy who presented clinically with strokelike episodes and strokelike abnormalities on brain magnetic resonance imaging in the setting of acute illness, and the long-term sequelae with evolution into cystic changes in one of these subjects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/08830738211006507DOI Listing
April 2021

Sudden infant death with dysgenesis of the testes syndrome in a non-Amish infant: A case report.

Am J Med Genet A 2020 11 4;182(11):2751-2754. Epub 2020 Sep 4.

Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.

Sudden Infant Death with Dysgenesis of the Testes syndrome (SIDDT) is a very rare condition associated with biallelic pathogenic variants in the TSPYL1 gene first reported in 2004. It is characterized by sudden cardiac or respiratory arrest, disordered testicular development, neurologic dysfunction, and is uniformly fatal before the age of 12 months. There were previously 21 reported cases of SIDDT in the literature, all from nine Old Order Amish families published in a single paper. In this report, we describe a non-Amish, phenotypically female infant with poor feeding and abnormal motor movements noted at birth. Initial testing showed that she had a 46,XY chromosome complement, and chromosomal microarray showed a significant absence of heterozygosity (AOH) totalling roughly 600 Mb across multiple different chromosomes, indicating consanguinity. Further workup with exome sequencing revealed homozygosity for a frameshift variant in TSPYL1 (c.725_726delTG, p.Val242GlufsTer52) consistent with a diagnosis of SIDDT, explaining many of her clinical features. However, she was also noted to have a mild T-cell lymphopenia and developed intractable epilepsy after hospital discharge. These features have not previously been reported in SIDDT and may represent phenotypic expansion. To our knowledge, this patient is the 22nd case of SIDDT to be reported in the literature, and the first to be of non-Amish heritage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.61842DOI Listing
November 2020

Missed opportunities: unidentified genetic risk factors in prenatal care.

Prenat Diagn 2018 01 24;38(1):75-79. Epub 2017 Apr 24.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX, USA.

Objective: Prenatal and preconception care guidelines recommend obtaining family history to screen for reproductive genetic risk. The effectiveness of this screening and subsequent referral for genetic counseling is not well established. This study describes how often pregnant women with reproductive genetic risks were not referred for prenatal genetic counseling and the indications frequently missed.

Method: We retrospectively reviewed genetic consultation medical records for first-trimester screen pretest counseling. These women had no documented indications for genetic counseling. We used the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics referral guidelines for genetic counseling to identify missed indications within the parents' personal and family histories. Patients with advanced maternal age were excluded.

Results: We reviewed 416 consultation notes. The counselor elicited a genetic risk for which a referral had not been made in 27% of the pregnant women. Of these, 70% were genetic risks in the family history, 23% in the couple's history, and 7% in the prenatal history. The most common missed indications were personal or family history of birth defects (38%), intellectual disability or autism (19%), and a prior positive genetic carrier screening test (14%).

Conclusion: Genetic risk factors are not consistently identified as a referral indication for reproductive genetic counseling. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pd.5048DOI Listing
January 2018

Blocking PGE2-induced tumour repopulation abrogates bladder cancer chemoresistance.

Nature 2015 Jan 3;517(7533):209-13. Epub 2014 Dec 3.

1] Department of Molecular &Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Program in Translational Biology and Molecular Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3] Dan L Duncan Cancer Center and Center for Cell Gene &Therapy, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [4] Scott Department of Urology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

Cytotoxic chemotherapy is effective in debulking tumour masses initially; however, in some patients tumours become progressively unresponsive after multiple treatment cycles. Previous studies have demonstrated that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are selectively enriched after chemotherapy through enhanced survival. Here we reveal a new mechanism by which bladder CSCs actively contribute to therapeutic resistance via an unexpected proliferative response to repopulate residual tumours between chemotherapy cycles, using human bladder cancer xenografts. Further analyses demonstrate the recruitment of a quiescent label-retaining pool of CSCs into cell division in response to chemotherapy-induced damages, similar to mobilization of normal stem cells during wound repair. While chemotherapy effectively induces apoptosis, associated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release paradoxically promotes neighbouring CSC repopulation. This repopulation can be abrogated by a PGE2-neutralizing antibody and celecoxib drug-mediated blockade of PGE2 signalling. In vivo administration of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) inhibitor celecoxib effectively abolishes a PGE2- and COX2-mediated wound response gene signature, and attenuates progressive manifestation of chemoresistance in xenograft tumours, including primary xenografts derived from a patient who was resistant to chemotherapy. Collectively, these findings uncover a new underlying mechanism that models the progressive development of clinical chemoresistance, and implicate an adjunctive therapy to enhance chemotherapeutic response of bladder urothelial carcinomas by abrogating early tumour repopulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature14034DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4465385PMC
January 2015

Stat3 activation in urothelial stem cells leads to direct progression to invasive bladder cancer.

Cancer Res 2012 Jul 24;72(13):3135-42. Epub 2012 Apr 24.

Department of Urology, Dan L Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

Two subtypes of human bladder cancer, noninvasive papillary and muscle-invasive cancer, develop through independent pathologic and molecular pathways. Human invasive bladder cancer frequently develops without prior clinical evidence of a noninvasive tumor stage. However, an animal model that recapitulates this unique clinical progression of invasive bladder cancer has not yet been developed. In this study, we created a novel transgenic mouse model of invasive bladder cancer by targeting an active dimerized form of Stat3 to the basal cells of bladder epithelium. When exposed to the carcinogen nitrosamine, Stat3-transgenic mice developed invasive cancer directly from carcinoma in situ (CIS), bypassing the noninvasive papillary tumor stage. Remarkably, invasive bladder cancer driven by active Stat3 was predominantly composed of stem cells, which were characterized by cytokeratin 14 (CK14) staining and enhanced tumor sphere-forming ability. Active Stat3 was also shown to localize to the nucleus of human invasive bladder cancers that were primarily composed of CK14+ stem cells. Together, our findings show that Stat3-induced stem cell expansion plays a critical role in the unique clinical progression of invasive bladder cancer through the CIS pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-11-3195DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3418917PMC
July 2012