Publications by authors named "Eric Woods"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Pathologically stiff erythrocytes impede contraction of blood clots.

J Thromb Haemost 2021 Aug 7;19(8):1990-2001. Epub 2021 Jul 7.

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Background: Blood clot contraction, volume shrinkage of the clot, is driven by platelet contraction and accompanied by compaction of the erythrocytes and their gradual shape change from biconcave to polyhedral, with the resulting cells named polyhedrocytes.

Objectives: Here, we examined the role of erythrocyte rigidity on clot contraction and erythrocyte shape transformation.

Methods: We used an optical tracking methodology that allowed us to quantify changes in contracting clot size over time.

Results And Conclusions: Erythrocyte rigidity has been shown to be increased in sickle cell disease (SCD), and in our experiments erythrocytes from SCD patients were 4-fold stiffer than those from healthy subjects. On average, the final extent of clot contraction was reduced by 53% in the clots from the blood of patients with SCD compared to healthy individuals, and there was significantly less polyhedrocyte formation. To test if this reduction in clot contraction was due to the increase in erythrocyte rigidity, we used stiffening of erythrocytes via chemical cross-linking (glutaraldehyde), rigidifying Wright antibodies (Wr ), and naturally more rigid llama ovalocytes. Results revealed that stiffening erythrocytes result in impaired clot contraction and fewer polyhedrocytes. These results demonstrate the role of erythrocyte rigidity in the contraction of blood clots and suggest that the impaired clot contraction/shrinkage in SCD is due to the reduced erythrocyte deformability, which may be an underappreciated mechanism that aggravates obstructiveness of erythrocyte-rich (micro)thrombi in SCD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jth.15407DOI Listing
August 2021

Transitioning Clinical Care for People Who Use Drugs to Telemedicine: Lessons Learned One Year into the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Telemed J E Health 2021 May 24. Epub 2021 May 24.

Division of General Internal Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA.

As a harm reduction-focused primary care clinic for people who use drugs, the Respectful and Equitable Access to Comprehensive Healthcare (REACH) Program faced multiple barriers due to the COVID-19 pandemic. We describe and evaluate how the telemedicine-driven adaptations REACH made allowed the program to engage its patients. REACH expanded its telemedicine capabilities by transitioning its in-person clinic and methods of connecting with referrals to telemedicine. The program provided patients with phones to increase access to needed technology. Throughout 2020, patient visits continuously shifted from being entirely in-person, to entirely telemedicine, to a hybrid model. Clinic show rates averaged 71% with this hybrid model, compared with 57% pre-COVID-19. Phones were distributed to 88 patients, 77% of which engaged in at least one telemedicine visit. Telemedicine allowed REACH to provide uninterrupted care during the pandemic. The program is now refining its hybrid model of telemedicine and in-person care to more equitably serve all patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/tmj.2021.0130DOI Listing
May 2021

Platelet heterogeneity enhances blood clot volumetric contraction: An example of asynchrono-mechanical amplification.

Biomaterials 2021 07 23;274:120828. Epub 2021 Apr 23.

George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 801 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA, 30332-0405, USA. Electronic address:

Physiological processes such as blood clotting and wound healing as well as pathologies such as fibroses and musculoskeletal contractures, all involve biological materials composed of a contracting cellular population within a fibrous matrix, yet how the microscale interactions among the cells and the matrix lead to the resultant emergent behavior at the macroscale tissue level remains poorly understood. Platelets, the anucleate cell fragments that do not divide nor synthesize extracellular matrix, represent an ideal model to study such systems. During blood clot contraction, microscopic platelets actively pull fibers to shrink the macroscale clot to less than 10% of its initial volume. We discovered that platelets utilize a new emergent behavior, asynchrono-mechanical amplification, to enhanced volumetric material contraction and to magnify contractile forces. This behavior is triggered by the heterogeneity in the timing of a population of actuators. This result indicates that cell heterogeneity, often attributed to stochastic cell-to-cell variability, can carry an essential biophysical function, thereby highlighting the importance of considering 4 dimensions (space + time) in cell-matrix biomaterials. This concept of amplification via heterogeneity can be harnessed to increase mechanical efficiency in diverse systems including implantable biomaterials, swarm robotics, and active polymer composites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2021.120828DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8184644PMC
July 2021

Spatially resolved 3D metabolomic profiling in tissues.

Sci Adv 2021 Jan 27;7(5). Epub 2021 Jan 27.

Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA.

Spatially resolved RNA and protein molecular analyses have revealed unexpected heterogeneity of cells. Metabolic analysis of individual cells complements these single-cell studies. Here, we present a three-dimensional spatially resolved metabolomic profiling framework (3D-SMF) to map out the spatial organization of metabolic fragments and protein signatures in immune cells of human tonsils. In this method, 3D metabolic profiles were acquired by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry to profile up to 189 compounds. Ion beams were used to measure sub-5-nanometer layers of tissue across 150 sections of a tonsil. To incorporate cell specificity, tonsil tissues were labeled by an isotope-tagged antibody library. To explore relations of metabolic and cellular features, we carried out data reduction, 3D spatial correlations and classifications, unsupervised K-means clustering, and network analyses. Immune cells exhibited spatially distinct lipidomic fragment distributions in lymphatic tissue. The 3D-SMF pipeline affects studying the immune cells in health and disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abd0957DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7840140PMC
January 2021

COVID-19, nationalism, and the politics of crisis: A scholarly exchange.

Nations Natl 2020 Jul 19. Epub 2020 Jul 19.

American University Washington, D.C. USA.

In this article, several scholars of nationalism discuss the potential for the COVID-19 pandemic to impact the development of nationalism and world politics. To structure the discussion, the contributors respond to three questions: (1) how should we understand the relationship between nationalism and COVID-19; (2) will COVID-19 fuel ethnic and nationalist conflict; and (3) will COVID-19 reinforce or erode the nation-state in the long run? The contributors formulated their responses to these questions near to the outset of the pandemic, amid intense uncertainty. This made it acutely difficult, if not impossible, to make predictions. Nevertheless, it was felt that a historically and theoretically informed discussion would shed light on the types of political processes that could be triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic. In doing so, the aim is to help orient researchers and policy-makers as they grapple with what has rapidly become the most urgent issue of our times.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nana.12644DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7404753PMC
July 2020

Corrigendum to "Community-Acquired Cavitary Pneumonia Linked to Use of a Home Humidifier".

Case Rep Infect Dis 2018 5;2018:6548482. Epub 2018 Jun 5.

Division of Infectious Diseases, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1155/2017/5474916.].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/6548482DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6009018PMC
June 2018

Highly selective aptamer based organic electrochemical biosensor with pico-level detection.

Biosens Bioelectron 2018 Oct 22;117:40-46. Epub 2018 May 22.

Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanoscience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32826, USA; College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32826, USA. Electronic address:

An organic aptamer functionalized electrochemical transistor has been developed to detect the presence of epinephrine molecule which acts as an excitatory neurotransmitter. The abnormalities in the level of epinephrine are the direct symptoms of some diseases such as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, myocardial infarction, arrhythmias and other heart related diseases. The present approach is based on immobilization of aptamers on the gate electrode which selectively binds to epinephrine with high affinity. The introduction of epinephrine in the system causes screening of negative charge of aptamers as well as the production of Faradaic current due to oxidation of epinephrine. The synergistic effect of these two events decreases the overall channel current which was seen in both transfer characteristics and current-time curve. Additional experiments against common interfering agents (dopamine, ascorbic acid, DOPAC etc) showed no decrease in the current which indicates high specificity of the sensor. Overall, the incorporation of aptamers in the transistor has allowed us to obtain a sensor exhibiting the lowest limit of detection for epinephrine (90 pM) till date which is comparable to normal physiological level. This approach provides a real-time detection of a large range of biomolecules and viral proteins in a time and cost-effective manner and has applications in point-of-care testing tool for several diagnostic applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2018.05.031DOI Listing
October 2018

In Situ XPS Investigation of Transformations at Crystallographically Oriented MoS Interfaces.

ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 2017 Sep 5;9(37):32394-32404. Epub 2017 Sep 5.

School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology , 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, United States.

Nanoscale transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) materials, such as MoS, exhibit promising behavior in next-generation electronics and energy-storage devices. TMDCs have a highly anisotropic crystal structure, with edge sites and basal planes exhibiting different structural, chemical, and electronic properties. In virtually all applications, two-dimensional or bulk TMDCs must be interfaced with other materials (such as electrical contacts in a transistor). The presence of edge sites vs basal planes (i.e., the crystallographic orientation of the TMDC) could influence the chemical and electronic properties of these solid-state interfaces, but such effects are not well understood. Here, we use in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate how the crystallography and structure of MoS influence chemical transformations at solid-state interfaces with various other materials. MoS materials with controllably aligned crystal structures (horizontal vs vertical orientation of basal planes) were fabricated, and in situ XPS was carried out by sputter-depositing three different materials (Li, Ge, and Ag) onto MoS within an XPS instrument while periodically collecting photoelectron spectra; these deposited materials are of interest due to their application in electronic devices or energy storage. The results showed that Li reacts readily with both crystallographic orientations of MoS to form metallic Mo and LiS, while Ag showed very little chemical or electronic interaction with either type of MoS. In contrast, Ge showed significant chemical interactions with MoS basal planes, but only minor chemical changes were observed when Ge contacted MoS edge sites. These findings have implications for electronic transport and band alignment at these interfaces, which is of significant interest for a variety of applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.7b10230DOI Listing
September 2017

Community-Acquired Cavitary Pneumonia Linked to Use of a Home Humidifier.

Case Rep Infect Dis 2017 28;2017:5474916. Epub 2017 Dec 28.

Division of Infectious Diseases, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.

is an opportunistic pathogen that rarely causes pneumonia in otherwise healthy patients. We describe a case of community-acquired pneumonia in a previously healthy individual who likely acquired the infection from a home humidifier.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2017/5474916DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5763093PMC
December 2017

Associations Between Asthma Control and Airway Obstruction and Performance of Activities of Daily Living in Older Adults with Asthma.

J Am Geriatr Soc 2016 05 10;64(5):1046-53. Epub 2016 May 10.

Division of General Internal Medicine, New York, New York.

Objectives: To determine the effect of asthma on functional limitations of older adults in the United States.

Design: Analyses were conducted with data from the Asthma Beliefs and Literacy in the Elderly study, a prospective cohort study of people aged 60 and older with asthma.

Setting: Participants were recruited from urban primary care and pulmonary specialty practices in New York City and Chicago between 2010 and 2012.

Participants: Individuals aged 60 and older with asthma (380 women, 72 men, mean age 67.5 ± 6.8 (range 60-98), 40% Latino, 30% black).

Measurements: Characteristics of participants with and without activity of daily living (ADL) limitations were compared using the chi-square test. Generalized estimating equations were used to model the relationships between poor asthma control (Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) score >1.5) and severity of airway obstruction (forced expiratory volume in 1-second (FEV1 )) and number of ADL limitations.

Results: Participants with one or more ADL limitations were more likely to be female (90% vs 81%, P = .02) and Latino (58% vs 32%, P < .001), have less than a high school education (53% vs 27%, P < .001) and an income of $1,350 per month or less (79% vs 46%, P < .001), and be unmarried (78% vs 64%, P = .003). In the adjusted analysis, poorer ACQ scores (odds ratio (OR) = 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.0-2.4; P = .05) but not severity of airway obstruction (OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 0.6-1.9) was associated with greater ADL limitations.

Conclusion: Older adults reporting poor asthma control are more likely to have ADL limitations than those with controlled asthma, although one-time spirometry may not adequately identify those at risk of physical impairment from asthma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jgs.14108DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4882261PMC
May 2016

Neuroanatomical correlates of apathy in late-life depression and antidepressant treatment response.

J Affect Disord 2014 Sep 22;166:179-86. Epub 2014 May 22.

Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Weill Cornell Institute of Geriatric Psychiatry, NY, USA.

Background: Apathy is a prominent feature of geriatric depression that predicts poor clinical outcomes and hinders depression treatment. Yet little is known about the neurobiology and treatment of apathy in late-life depression. This study examined apathy prevalence in a clinical sample of depressed elderly, response of apathy to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment, and neuroanatomical correlates that distinguished responders from non-responders and healthy controls.

Methods: Participants included 45 non-demented, elderly with major depression and 43 elderly comparison individuals. After a 2-week single-blind placebo period, depressed participants received escitalopram 10mg daily for 12 weeks. The Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES) and 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) were administered at baseline and 12 weeks. MRI scans were acquired at baseline for concurrent structural and diffusion tensor imaging of anterior cingulate gray matter and associated white matter tracts.

Results: 35.5% of depressed patients suffered from apathy. This declined to 15.6% (p<0.1) following treatment, but 43% of initial sufferers continued to report significant apathy. Improvement of apathy with SSRI was independent of change in depression but correlated with larger left posterior subgenual cingulate volumes and greater fractional anisotropy of left uncinate fasciculi.

Limitations: Modest sample size, no placebo control, post-hoc secondary analysis, use of 1.5T MRI scanner

Conclusions: While prevalent in geriatric depression, apathy is separable from depression with regards to medication response. Structural abnormalities of the posterior subgenual cingulate and uncinate fasciculus may perpetuate apathetic states by interfering with prefrontal cortical recruitment of limbic activity essential to motivated behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2014.05.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4096713PMC
September 2014

Ten years of breast screening in the Nova Scotia Breast Screening Program, 1991-2001. experience: use of an adaptable stereotactic device in the diagnosis of screening-detected abnormalities.

Can Assoc Radiol J 2005 Apr;56(2):82-93

Department of Radiology, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, and Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia Breast Screening Program, Halifax, NS.

Objective: To evaluate and present 10-year outcomes of the Nova Scotia Breast Screening Program (NSBSP), a population-based screening program in the province of Nova Scotia, Canada, total population 900 000.

Setting: Organized Breast Screening Program in Nova Scotia, Canada.

Methods: Rates of participation, abnormal referrals, cancer detection rates, and benign:malignant (B:M) rates for core biopsy and surgical biopsy were calculated for asymptomatic women receiving a mammogram through the NSBSP 1991-2001.

Results: Of 192 454 mammograms performed on 71 317 women, 33% were aged 40 to 49 years, 39% aged 50 to 59 years, 23% aged 60 to 69 years, and 5% aged 70 years and over. Cancer detection rate increased in each age group respectively: 3.7, 5.8, 9.7, and 13.5 per 1000 population on first-time screens. The positive predictive value of an abnormal screen increased with increasing age groups. Benign breast surgery decreased with increased use of needle core breast biopsy (NCBB). Open surgery decreased from 25 to 6 surgeries per 1000 screens. Of 1519 open surgical procedures (1328 women), 878 cancers were removed, with 37% 10 mm or less, and 61% 15 mm or less. In 613 women in whom the node status was assessed, 79% were negative.

Conclusion: A quality screening program incorporating NCBB in the diagnostic work-up is effective in the early detection of breast cancer and results in less open surgery, particularly in younger women.
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April 2005
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