Publications by authors named "Eric W Jeffery"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A polyploid admixed origin of beer yeasts derived from European and Asian wine populations.

PLoS Biol 2019 03 5;17(3):e3000147. Epub 2019 Mar 5.

Pacific Northwest Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.

Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae used to make beer, bread, and wine are genetically and phenotypically distinct from wild populations associated with trees. The origins of these domesticated populations are not always clear; human-associated migration and admixture with wild populations have had a strong impact on S. cerevisiae population structure. We examined the population genetic history of beer strains and found that ale strains and the S. cerevisiae portion of allotetraploid lager strains were derived from admixture between populations closely related to European grape wine strains and Asian rice wine strains. Similar to both lager and baking strains, ale strains are polyploid, providing them with a passive means of remaining isolated from other populations and providing us with a living relic of their ancestral hybridization. To reconstruct their polyploid origin, we phased the genomes of two ale strains and found ale haplotypes to both be recombinants between European and Asian alleles and to also contain novel alleles derived from extinct or as yet uncharacterized populations. We conclude that modern beer strains are the product of a historical melting pot of fermentation technology.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.3000147DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6400334PMC
March 2019

Transcriptional Profiling of Biofilm Regulators Identified by an Overexpression Screen in .

G3 (Bethesda) 2017 08 7;7(8):2845-2854. Epub 2017 Aug 7.

Pacific Northwest Research Institute, Seattle, Washington 98122

Biofilm formation by microorganisms is a major cause of recurring infections and removal of biofilms has proven to be extremely difficult given their inherent drug resistance . Understanding the biological processes that underlie biofilm formation is thus extremely important and could lead to the development of more effective drug therapies, resulting in better infection outcomes. Using the yeast as a biofilm model, overexpression screens identified , , , , , and as regulators of biofilm formation. Subsequent RNA-seq analysis of biofilm and nonbiofilm-forming strains revealed that all of the overexpression strains, other than and , were adopting a single differential expression profile, although induced to varying degrees. adopted a separate profile, while the expression profile of reflected the common pattern seen in most of the strains, plus substantial -specific expression changes. We interpret the existence of the common transcriptional pattern seen across multiple, unrelated overexpression strains as reflecting a transcriptional state, that the yeast cell can access through regulatory signaling mechanisms, allowing an adaptive morphological change between biofilm-forming and nonbiofilm states.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1534/g3.117.042440DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5555487PMC
August 2017

Dissecting Gene Expression Changes Accompanying a Ploidy-Based Phenotypic Switch.

G3 (Bethesda) 2017 01 5;7(1):233-246. Epub 2017 Jan 5.

Pacific Northwest Research Institute, Seattle, Washington 98122

Aneuploidy, a state in which the chromosome number deviates from a multiple of the haploid count, significantly impacts human health. The phenotypic consequences of aneuploidy are believed to arise from gene expression changes associated with the altered copy number of genes on the aneuploid chromosomes. To dissect the mechanisms underlying altered gene expression in aneuploids, we used RNA-seq to measure transcript abundance in colonies of the haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain F45 and two aneuploid derivatives harboring disomies of chromosomes XV and XVI. F45 colonies display complex "fluffy" morphologies, while the disomic colonies are smooth, resembling laboratory strains. Our two disomes displayed similar transcriptional profiles, a phenomenon not driven by their shared smooth colony morphology nor simply by their karyotype. Surprisingly, the environmental stress response (ESR) was induced in F45, relative to the two disomes. We also identified genes whose expression reflected a nonlinear interaction between the copy number of a transcriptional regulatory gene on chromosome XVI, DIG1, and the copy number of other chromosome XVI genes. DIG1 and the remaining chromosome XVI genes also demonstrated distinct contributions to the effect of the chromosome XVI disome on ESR gene expression. Expression changes in aneuploids appear to reflect a mixture of effects shared between different aneuploidies and effects unique to perturbing the copy number of particular chromosomes, including nonlinear copy number interactions between genes. The balance between these two phenomena is likely to be genotype- and environment-specific.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1534/g3.116.036160DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5217112PMC
January 2017

Independent Origins of Yeast Associated with Coffee and Cacao Fermentation.

Curr Biol 2016 Apr 24;26(7):965-71. Epub 2016 Mar 24.

Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Institute, Seattle, WA 98122, USA; Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Electronic address:

Modern transportation networks have facilitated the migration and mingling of previously isolated populations of plants, animals, and insects. Human activities can also influence the global distribution of microorganisms. The best-understood example is yeasts associated with winemaking. Humans began making wine in the Middle East over 9,000 years ago [1, 2]. Selecting favorable fermentation products created specialized strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae [3, 4] that were transported along with grapevines. Today, S. cerevisiae strains residing in vineyards around the world are genetically similar, and their population structure suggests a common origin that followed the path of human migration [3-7]. Like wine, coffee and cacao depend on microbial fermentation [8, 9] and have been globally dispersed by humans. Theobroma cacao originated in the Amazon and Orinoco basins of Colombia and Venezuela [10], was cultivated in Central America by Mesoamerican peoples, and was introduced to Europeans by Hernán Cortés in 1530 [11]. Coffea, native to Ethiopia, was disseminated by Arab traders throughout the Middle East and North Africa in the 6(th) century and was introduced to European consumers in the 17(th) century [12]. Here, we tested whether the yeasts associated with coffee and cacao are genetically similar, crop-specific populations or genetically diverse, geography-specific populations. Our results uncovered populations that, while defined by niche and geography, also bear signatures of admixture between major populations in events independent of the transport of the plants. Thus, human-associated fermentation and migration may have affected the distribution of yeast involved in the production of coffee and chocolate.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2016.02.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4821677PMC
April 2016

Allelic variation, aneuploidy, and nongenetic mechanisms suppress a monogenic trait in yeast.

Genetics 2015 Jan 13;199(1):247-62. Epub 2014 Nov 13.

Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Institute, Seattle, Washington 98122

Clinically relevant features of monogenic diseases, including severity of symptoms and age of onset, can vary widely in response to environmental differences as well as to the presence of genetic modifiers affecting the trait's penetrance and expressivity. While a better understanding of modifier loci could lead to treatments for Mendelian diseases, the rarity of individuals harboring both a disease-causing allele and a modifying genotype hinders their study in human populations. We examined the genetic architecture of monogenic trait modifiers using a well-characterized yeast model of the human Mendelian disease classic galactosemia. Yeast strains with loss-of-function mutations in the yeast ortholog (GAL7) of the human disease gene (GALT) fail to grow in the presence of even small amounts of galactose due to accumulation of the same toxic intermediates that poison human cells. To isolate and individually genotype large numbers of the very rare (∼0.1%) galactose-tolerant recombinant progeny from a cross between two gal7Δ parents, we developed a new method, called "FACS-QTL." FACS-QTL improves upon the currently used approaches of bulk segregant analysis and extreme QTL mapping by requiring less genome engineering and strain manipulation as well as maintaining individual genotype information. Our results identified multiple distinct solutions by which the monogenic trait could be suppressed, including genetic and nongenetic mechanisms as well as frequent aneuploidy. Taken together, our results imply that the modifiers of monogenic traits are likely to be genetically complex and heterogeneous.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1534/genetics.114.170563DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4286688PMC
January 2015

Aneuploidy underlies a multicellular phenotypic switch.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2013 Jul 28;110(30):12367-72. Epub 2013 Jun 28.

Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, WA 98109, USA.

Although microorganisms are traditionally used to investigate unicellular processes, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has the ability to form colonies with highly complex, multicellular structures. Colonies with the "fluffy" morphology have properties reminiscent of bacterial biofilms and are easily distinguished from the "smooth" colonies typically formed by laboratory strains. We have identified strains that are able to reversibly toggle between the fluffy and smooth colony-forming states. Using a combination of flow cytometry and high-throughput restriction-site associated DNA tag sequencing, we show that this switch is correlated with a change in chromosomal copy number. Furthermore, the gain of a single chromosome is sufficient to switch a strain from the fluffy to the smooth state, and its subsequent loss to revert the strain back to the fluffy state. Because copy number imbalance of six of the 16 S. cerevisiae chromosomes and even a single gene can modulate the switch, our results support the hypothesis that the state switch is produced by dosage-sensitive genes, rather than a general response to altered DNA content. These findings add a complex, multicellular phenotype to the list of molecular and cellular traits known to be altered by aneuploidy and suggest that chromosome missegregation can provide a quick, heritable, and reversible mechanism by which organisms can toggle between phenotypes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1301047110DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3725063PMC
July 2013

High-throughput tetrad analysis.

Nat Methods 2013 Jul 12;10(7):671-5. Epub 2013 May 12.

Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Tetrad analysis has been a gold-standard genetic technique for several decades. Unfortunately, the need to manually isolate, disrupt and space tetrads has relegated its application to small-scale studies and limited its integration with high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies. We have developed a rapid, high-throughput method, called barcode-enabled sequencing of tetrads (BEST), that uses (i) a meiosis-specific GFP fusion protein to isolate tetrads by FACS and (ii) molecular barcodes that are read during genotyping to identify spores derived from the same tetrad. Maintaining tetrad information allows accurate inference of missing genetic markers and full genotypes of missing (and presumably nonviable) individuals. An individual researcher was able to isolate over 3,000 yeast tetrads in 3 h, an output equivalent to that of almost 1 month of manual dissection. BEST is transferable to other microorganisms for which meiotic mapping is significantly more laborious.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nmeth.2479DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3696418PMC
July 2013

A minority of concurrent monoclonal lymphocytes and plasmacytic cells sharing light chains are genetically related in putative lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma.

Leuk Res 2011 Dec 14;35(12):1597-604. Epub 2011 Jul 14.

HematoLogics Inc., 3161 Elliott Ave, Seattle, WA 98121, USA.

Flow cytometric cell sorting combined with molecular gene rearrangement analysis was used to detect and to further characterize simultaneously occurring phenotypically distinct B cell monoclonal lymphoid and monoclonal plasma cell populations from 38 individual specimens. By sorting and subsequent gene rearrangement analysis, separate or identical monoclonality genotypes could be revealed and confirmed. In only 13 of 38 specimens, the B lymphoid cells and plasma cell populations showed an identical genotypic profile, while 25 had non-identical profiles (including 4 process control specimens). The majority of the genotypically identical group had a phenotype consistent with Waldenström's/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (WM/LPL), while WM/LPL phenotype was present in 16/25 of the non-identical cases. Proof of an identical monoclonal genotype for plasmacytic and B-lymphoid cell populations must be used to define WM/LPL as a distinct entity in the clinical setting of monoclonal lymphoid and plasma cells expressing the same light chains. Conversely, the confirmation of genotypically distinct populations can significantly improve confidence in diagnostic and prognostic decisions in specimens with B lymphoid lymphomas and a concurrent, possibly smoldering myeloma or multiple myeloma. These techniques are requisite in future clinical studies for diagnosis and prognosis in these diseases.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leukres.2011.06.012DOI Listing
December 2011

Structure-activity relationship of synthetic toll-like receptor 4 agonists.

J Biol Chem 2004 Feb 21;279(6):4440-9. Epub 2003 Oct 21.

Corixa Corporation, Seattle, Washington 98104, USA.

Important questions remain regarding the impact of variations in the structure of the lipid A portion of lipopolysaccharide on activation of cells via the Toll-like receptor 4 complex. We have studied a series of synthetic lipid A mimetic compounds known as aminoalkyl glucosaminide phosphates in which the length of the secondary acyl chain has been systematically varied. Using transcriptional profiling of human monocytes and responses of Toll-like receptor 4 complex cell transfectants, we demonstrate a clear dependence of length on secondary acyl chain on Toll-like receptor 4 activation. Compounds with secondary acyl chains less than eight carbons in length have dramatically reduced activity, and substitutions of the left-sided secondary acyl chain had the most important effect on the Toll-like receptor 4 agonist activity of these molecules. The structure-function relationships of these compounds assessed via the induction of chemokines and cytokines following in vivo administration closely mirrored those seen with cell-based studies. This novel set of synthetic lipid A mimetics will be useful for Toll-like receptor 4-based investigations and may have clinical utility as stand-alone immunomodulators.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M310760200DOI Listing
February 2004