Publications by authors named "Eric Nolan"

3 Publications

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Dosage-dependent copy number gains in E2f1 and E2f3 drive hepatocellular carcinoma.

J Clin Invest 2017 Mar 30;127(3):830-842. Epub 2017 Jan 30.

Disruption of the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor pathway, either through genetic mutation of upstream regulatory components or mutation of RB1 itself, is believed to be a required event in cancer. However, genetic alterations in the RB-regulated E2F family of transcription factors are infrequent, casting doubt on a direct role for E2Fs in driving cancer. In this work, a mutation analysis of human cancer revealed subtle but impactful copy number gains in E2F1 and E2F3 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Using a series of loss- and gain-of-function alleles to dial E2F transcriptional output, we have shown that copy number gains in E2f1 or E2f3b resulted in dosage-dependent spontaneous HCC in mice without the involvement of additional organs. Conversely, germ-line loss of E2f1 or E2f3b, but not E2f3a, protected mice against HCC. Combinatorial mapping of chromatin occupancy and transcriptome profiling identified an E2F1- and E2F3B-driven transcriptional program that was associated with development and progression of HCC. These findings demonstrate a direct and cell-autonomous role for E2F activators in human cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/JCI87583DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5330731PMC
March 2017

Mouse development with a single E2F activator.

Nature 2008 Aug 25;454(7208):1137-41. Epub 2008 Jun 25.

Department of Molecular Genetics, College of Biological Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA.

The E2F family is conserved from Caenorhabditis elegans to mammals, with some family members having transcription activation functions and others having repressor functions. Whereas C. elegans and Drosophila melanogaster have a single E2F activator protein and repressor protein, mammals have at least three activator and five repressor proteins. Why such genetic complexity evolved in mammals is not known. To begin to evaluate this genetic complexity, we targeted the inactivation of the entire subset of activators, E2f1, E2f2, E2f3a and E2f3b, singly or in combination in mice. We demonstrate that E2f3a is sufficient to support mouse embryonic and postnatal development. Remarkably, expression of E2f3b or E2f1 from the E2f3a locus (E2f3a(3bki) or E2f3a(1ki), respectively) suppressed all the postnatal phenotypes associated with the inactivation of E2f3a. We conclude that there is significant functional redundancy among activators and that the specific requirement for E2f3a during postnatal development is dictated by regulatory sequences governing its selective spatiotemporal expression and not by its intrinsic protein functions. These findings provide a molecular basis for the observed specificity among E2F activators during development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature07066DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4288824PMC
August 2008

Bilateral thalamic lesions affect recollection- and familiarity-based recognition memory judgments.

Cortex 2005 Dec;41(6):778-88

Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94728-3190, USA.

The contribution of the thalamus to different forms of explicit memory is poorly understood. In the current study, explicit memory performance was examined in a 40-year-old male (RG) with bilateral anterior and medial thalamic lesions. Standardized tests indicated that the patient exhibited more severe recall than recognition deficits and his performance was generally worse for verbal compared to nonverbal memory. Recognition memory tests using the remember-know (R/K) procedure and the confidence-based receiver operating characteristic (ROC) procedure were used to examine recollection- and familiarity-based recognition. These tests revealed that RG had deficits in recollection and smaller, but consistent deficits in familiarity. The results are in agreement with models indicating that the anteromedial thalamus is important for both recollection- and familiarity-based recognition memory.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0010-9452(08)70296-xDOI Listing
December 2005