Publications by authors named "Eric D Isaacs"

5 Publications

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Lessons From Learners: Adapting Medical Student Education During and Post-COVID-19.

Acad Med 2021 May 4. Epub 2021 May 4.

M.R.H. Castro is a third-year medical student, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California; ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2085-4893. L.M. Calthorpe is a third-year medical student, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California; ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0496-9471. S.E. Fogh is associate professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. S. McAllister is a third-year medical student, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. C.L Johnson is a third-year medical student, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. E.D. Isaacs is professor of emergency medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California. A. Ishizaki is manager, Clinical Microsystems Clerkship, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. A. Kozas is curriculum coordinator, Clinical Microsystems Clerkship, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. D. Lo is assistant professor of medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine; and Department of Geriatrics and Extended Care, San Francisco Veterans Affairs Health Care System, San Francisco, California. S. Rennke is professor of medicine, Division of Hospital Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. J. Davis is professor of medicine and associate dean for curriculum, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. A. Chang is professor of medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many medical schools suspended clinical clerkships and implemented newly adapted curricula to facilitate continued educational progress. While the implementation of these new curricula has been described, an understanding of the impact on student learning outcomes is lacking. In 2020, the authors followed Kern's 6-step approach to curricular development to create and evaluate a novel COVID-19 curriculum for medical students at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine and evaluate its learning outcomes. The primary goal of the curriculum was to provide third- and fourth-year medical students an opportunity for workplace learning in the absence of clinical clerkships, specifically for students to develop clerkship-level milestones in the competency domains of practice-based learning and improvement, professionalism, and systems-based practice. The curriculum was designed to match students with faculty-mentored projects occurring primarily in virtual formats. A total of 126 students enrolled in the curriculum and completed a survey about their learning outcomes (100% response rate). Of 35 possible clerkship-level milestones, there were 12 milestones for which over half of students reported development, in competency domains including practice-based learning and improvement, professionalism, and interpersonal and communication skills. Thematic analysis of students' qualitative survey responses demonstrated 2 central motivations for participating in the curriculum: identity as physicians-in-training, and patient engagement. Six central learning areas were developed during the curriculum: interprofessional teamwork, community resources, technology in medicine, skill-building, quality improvement, and specialty-specific learning. This analysis demonstrates that students can develop competencies and achieve rich workplace learning through project-based experiential learning, even in virtual clinical workplaces. Furthermore, knowledge of community resources, technology in medicine, and quality improvement were developed through the curriculum more readily than in traditional clerkships, and could be considered as integral learning objectives in future curricular design.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004148DOI Listing
May 2021

Sonographic Findings in Necrotizing Fasciitis: Two Ends of the Spectrum.

J Ultrasound Med 2016 Oct 31;35(10):2273-7. Epub 2016 Aug 31.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California, San Francisco Medical Center, San Francisco, California USA.

Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare but serious disease, and early diagnosis is essential to reducing its substantial morbidity and mortality. The 2 cases presented show that the key clinical and radiographic features of necrotizing fasciitis exist along a continuum of severity at initial presentation; thus, this diagnosis should not be prematurely ruled out in cases that do not show the dramatic features familiar to most clinicians. Although computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are considered the most effective imaging modalities, the cases described here illustrate how sonography should be recommended as an initial imaging test to make a rapid diagnosis and initiate therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7863/ultra.15.12068DOI Listing
October 2016

The violent or agitated patient.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2010 Feb;28(1):235-56, x

Division of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 701 Welch Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA.

Violent and agitated patients are high risk because they may pose a physical threat to the staff, may harm themselves, and may have dangerous comorbidities and illness that are causing the violence. The emergency physician must quickly control these behaviors, and thoroughly identify and treat their etiology, while simultaneously protecting the patients' rights and reducing the risks of injury to themselves, other patients, and medical staff. This article highlights potentially high-risk situations and describes corresponding mitigation tactics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2009.10.006DOI Listing
February 2010

Microscopy: X-ray nanovision.

Authors:
Eric D Isaacs

Nature 2006 Jul;442(7098):35

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/442035aDOI Listing
July 2006

Structural visualization of polarization fatigue in epitaxial ferroelectric oxide devices.

Nat Mater 2004 Jun 23;3(6):365-9. Epub 2004 May 23.

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA.

Ferroelectric oxides, such as Pb(Zr,Ti)O(3), are useful for electronic and photonic devices because of their ability to retain two stable polarization states, which can form the basis for memory and logic circuitry. Requirements for long-term operation of practical devices such as non-volatile RAM (random access memory) include consistent polarization switching over many (more than 10(12)) cycles of the applied electric field, which represents a major challenge. As switching is largely controlled by the motion and pinning of domain walls, it is necessary to develop suitable tools that can directly probe the ferroelectric domain structures in operating devices-thin-film structures with electrical contacts. A recently developed synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction technique complements existing microscopic probes, and allows us to visualize directly the evolution of polarization domains in ferroelectric devices, through metal or oxide electrodes, and with submicrometre spatial resolution. The images reveal two regimes of fatigue, depending on the magnitude of the electric field pulses driving the device: a low-field regime in which fatigue can be reversed with higher electric field pulses, and a regime at very high electric fields in which there is a non-reversible crystallographic relaxation of the epitaxial ferroelectric film.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nmat1122DOI Listing
June 2004