Publications by authors named "Eri Oguro-Igashira"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Multi-trait and cross-population genome-wide association studies across autoimmune and allergic diseases identify shared and distinct genetic component.

Ann Rheum Dis 2022 Jun 26. Epub 2022 Jun 26.

Department of Statistical Genetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan

Objectives: Autoimmune and allergic diseases are outcomes of the dysregulation of the immune system. Our study aimed to elucidate differences or shared components in genetic backgrounds between autoimmune and allergic diseases.

Methods: We estimated genetic correlation and performed multi-trait and cross-population genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of six immune-related diseases: rheumatoid arthritis, Graves' disease, type 1 diabetes for autoimmune diseases and asthma, atopic dermatitis and pollinosis for allergic diseases. By integrating large-scale biobank resources (Biobank Japan and UK biobank), our study included 105 721 cases and 433 663 controls. Newly identified variants were evaluated in 21 778 cases and 712 767 controls for two additional autoimmune diseases: psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus. We performed enrichment analyses of cell types and biological pathways to highlight shared and distinct perspectives.

Results: Autoimmune and allergic diseases were not only mutually classified based on genetic backgrounds but also they had multiple positive genetic correlations beyond the classifications. Multi-trait GWAS meta-analysis newly identified six allergic disease-associated loci. We identified four loci shared between the six autoimmune and allergic diseases (rs10803431 at , OR=1.07, p=2.3×10, rs2053062 at , OR=0.90, p=2.9×10, rs2210366 at , OR=1.07, p=2.5×10 in Japanese and rs4529910 at , OR=0.96, p=1.9×10 across ancestries). Associations of rs10803431 and rs4529910 were confirmed at the two additional autoimmune diseases. Enrichment analysis demonstrated link to T cells, natural killer cells and various cytokine signals, including innate immune pathways.

Conclusion: Our multi-trait and cross-population study should elucidate complex pathogenesis shared components across autoimmune and allergic diseases.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2022-222460DOI Listing
June 2022

Longitudinal alterations of the gut mycobiota and microbiota on COVID-19 severity.

BMC Infect Dis 2022 Jun 24;22(1):572. Epub 2022 Jun 24.

Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Japan.

Background: The impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on the gut fungal (mycobiota) and bacterial (microbiota) communities has been elucidated individually. This study analyzed both gut mycobiota and microbiota and their correlation in the COVID-19 patients with severe and mild conditions and follow-up to monitor their alterations after recovery.

Methods: We analyzed the gut mycobiota and microbiota by bacterial 16S and fungal ITS1 metagenomic sequencing of 40 severe patients, 38 mild patients, and 30 healthy individuals and reanalyzed those of 10 patients with severe COVID-19 approximately 6 months after discharge.

Results: The mycobiota of the severe and mild groups showed lower diversity than the healthy group, and in some, characteristic patterns dominated by a single fungal species, Candida albicans, were detected. Lower microbial diversity in the severe group was observed, but no differences in its diversity or community structure were detected between the mild and healthy groups. The microbiota of the severe group was characterized by an increase in Enterococcus and Lactobacillus, and a decrease in Faecalibacterium and Bacteroides. The abundance of Candida was positively correlated with that of Enterococcus in patients with COVID-19. After the recovery of severe patients, alteration of the microbiota remained, but the mycobiota recovered its diversity comparable to that of mild and healthy groups.

Conclusion: In mild cases, the microbiota is stable during SARS-CoV-2 infection, but in severe cases, alterations persist for 6 months after recovery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12879-022-07358-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9233337PMC
June 2022

Anterior chamber flare and ciliochoroidal detachment using flare photometry and anterior segment optical coherence tomography in acute lupus choroidopathy: A case report.

Am J Ophthalmol Case Rep 2022 Mar 31;25:101314. Epub 2022 Jan 31.

Department of Ophthalmology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871, Japan.

Purpose: To report anterior chamber flare using laser flare photometry and ciliochoroidal detachment using anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) in a new onset acute lupus choroidopathy case.

Observations: A 57-year-old woman with severe nephritis, pleural effusion, and ascites was referred to our ophthalmology clinic for rapid onset of bilateral blurred vision and eyelid swelling. She had a bilateral high-flared, shallow anterior chamber, and bilateral ciliochoroidal detachment, which was revealed using laser flare photometry and AS-OCT. She also had a serous retinal detachment and disc-macular retinoschisis with a thicker choroid and waved Bruch's membrane. Indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) demonstrated partial hypocyanescence in the early phase and multiple hypercyanescent spots at the intermediate to late phase, which are typical of lupus choroidopathy. Systemic lupus erythematosus was diagnosed, and after the administration of pulse methylprednisolone and pulse cyclophosphamide therapies, all eye findings completely resolved in a month, and all other signs and symptoms improved.

Conclusions And Importance: Lupus choroidopathy, which is less common than retinopathy, might be under-diagnosed because of its difficult evaluation. Although ICGA is the gold standard for diagnosing lupus choroidopathy, a high flare of the anterior chamber and ciliochoroidal detachment might be different from lupus retinopathy. Laser flare photometry and AS-OCT can be non-invasive, helpful tools for the longitudinal evaluation of the patient's response to therapy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajoc.2022.101314DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8818488PMC
March 2022

Whole gut virome analysis of 476 Japanese revealed a link between phage and autoimmune disease.

Ann Rheum Dis 2022 02 8;81(2):278-288. Epub 2021 Dec 8.

Department of Statistical Genetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan

Objective: The relationship between autoimmune diseases and the gut microbiome has been intensively studied, and several autoimmunity-associated bacterial taxa have been identified. However, much less is known about the roles of the gut virome in autoimmune diseases.

Methods: Here, we performed a whole gut virome analysis based on the shotgun sequencing of 476 Japanese which included patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis and healthy control subjects.

Results: Our case-control comparison of the viral abundance revealed that crAss-like phages, which are one of the main components of a healthy gut virome, significantly decreased in the gut of the patients with autoimmune disease, specifically the patients with RA and SLE. In addition, significantly decreased in the gut of the patients with SLE. To understand how these viruses affected the bacteriome, we performed a quantitative virus-bacterium association analysis and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-based virus-bacterium interaction analysis. We identified a symbiosis between e and . In addition, multiple bacterial targets of crAss-like phages were identified (eg, spp).

Conclusion: Our data suggest that the gut virome can affect our body either directly or via bacteria. Our analyses have elucidated a previously missing part of the autoimmunity-associated gut microbiome and presented new candidates that contribute to the development of autoimmune diseases.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2021-221267DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8761997PMC
February 2022

Metagenome-wide association study revealed disease-specific landscape of the gut microbiome of systemic lupus erythematosus in Japanese.

Ann Rheum Dis 2021 12 23;80(12):1575-1583. Epub 2021 Aug 23.

Department of Statistical Genetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan

Objective: Alteration of the gut microbiome has been linked to the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, a comprehensive view of the gut microbiome in SLE and its interaction with the host remains to be revealed. This study aimed to reveal SLE-associated changes in the gut microbiome and its interaction with the host by a comprehensive metagenome-wide association study (MWAS) followed by integrative analysis.

Methods: We performed a MWAS of SLE based on shotgun sequencing of the gut microbial DNA from Japanese individuals ( =47, =203). We integrated the result of the MWAS with the genome-wide association study (GWAS) data and plasma metabolite data.

Results: Via species level phylogenetic analysis, we identified and validated increases of and in the patients with SLE. Microbial gene analysis revealed increases of -derived genes including one involved in redox reaction. Additionally, microbial pathways related to sulfur metabolism and flagella assembly were altered in the patients with SLE. We identified an overlap in the enriched biological pathways between the metagenome and the germline genome by comparing the result of the MWAS and the GWAS of SLE (ie, MWAS-GWAS interaction). α-diversity and β-diversity analyses provided evidence of dysbiosis in the metagenome of the patients with SLE. Microbiome-metabolome association analysis identified positive dosage correlation of acylcarnitine with , an SLE-associated taxon.

Conclusion: Our MWAS followed by integrative analysis revealed SLE-associated changes in the gut microbiome and its interaction with the host, which contribute to our understanding of the relationship between the microbiome and SLE.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2021-220687DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8600607PMC
December 2021
-->