Publications by authors named "Endeshaw Chekol Abebe"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Prevalence and Associated Factors of Human Immune Deficiency Virus and Tuberculosis Co-Infection in Patients Attending Kolla Diba Health Center, Dembia District, Northwest Ethiopia.

HIV AIDS (Auckl) 2021 12;13:191-196. Epub 2021 Feb 12.

Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Background: TB-HIV co-infection is the most common problem of African countries, especially, Sub-Saharan countries including Ethiopia. So this study aimed to assess TB-HIV co-infection with its associated factors in patients with Tuberculosis in Northwest Ethiopia. Although the prevalence of TB-HIV was low, the need for strengthening the health extension program especially in urban dwellers also needed to include TB-HIV testing.

Objective: This study aimed to assess TB-HIV co-infection with its associated factors in patients with Tuberculosis in Northwest Ethiopia.

Methodology: Institutional based cross-sectional study has been done and a total of 638 subjects participated in the study. The data of the study subjects were collected from the tuberculosis logbook using two trained data collectors who were work in the TB DOTS program and by using a well-prepared checklist and SPSS was used for analyzing data.

Results: 9.7% (62/638) of TB patients were found to be co-infected with HIV. Among these 32 (11.4%) were females and 30 (8.4%) were males. More infected individuals were found in urban residents 44 (20%) than rural residents and age groups 30-40 years 31 (22.5%) are more infected than the other age group. TBforms, age, and residence were associated with HIV/TB co-infection significantly.

Conclusions And Recommendations: Although the prevalence of TB-HIV was low, the need for strengthening the health extension program especially in urban dwellers is needed to include TB-HIV testing. Further surveys involving HIV infected TB patients to strengthen and scale-up for TB and HIV is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/HIV.S282201DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7886106PMC
February 2021

The Role of Regulatory B Cells in Health and Diseases: A Systemic Review.

J Inflamm Res 2021 12;14:75-84. Epub 2021 Jan 12.

Department of Physiology, College of Health Sciences, Debre Tabor University, Debre Tabor, Ethiopia.

Equivalent to regulatory T cells, a novel B cell populace, called regulatory B cells (Bregs), has been found to exert a negative immune regulatory role. These subsets of cells account for 0.5% of human B cells from the periphery that expand after activation upon certain stimuli depending on the nature of the microenvironment and provide a variety of Breg cell phenotypes. The increasing number of suppressive mechanisms attributed to Bregs suggests that these immune cells play many roles in immune regulation. Bregs have been confirmed to play a role in host defense mechanisms of healthy individuals as well as they play pathologic and protective roles in diseases or other conditions. Accumulating evidence reported that Bregs have a role in autoimmune and infectious diseases to lower inflammation, and in cancer to attenuate antitumor immune responses, thereby to promote cancer growth and metastasis. More recently, Bregs are also found to be involved in conditions like transplantation for transplant tolerance, during pregnancy to create an immune-privileged uterine environment and during early neonate life. Herein, the review summarizes recent findings aimed to provide understanding on the Breg cells, in the hope to gain insight on the general overview, development, mechanism of activation, and action of Bregs as well as their potential roles in health and diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JIR.S286426DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7811483PMC
January 2021

The newly emerged COVID-19 disease: a systemic review.

Virol J 2020 07 8;17(1):96. Epub 2020 Jul 8.

Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Coronaviruses are large family-RNA viruses that belong to the order Nidovirales, family Coronaviridae, subfamily Coronavirinae. The novel COVID-19 infection, caused by a beta coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2, is a new outbreak that has been emerged in Wuhan, China in December 2019. The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, cough, and dyspnea. As per the March 12, 2020, WHO report, more than 125,048 confirmed COVID-19 cases and over 4613 deaths have been identified in more than 117 countries. It is now regarded as a pandemic that seriously spread and attack the world. The primary means of transmission is person to person through droplets that occurred during coughing or sneezing, through personal contact (shaking hands), or by touching contaminated objects. So far, there is no effective therapy and vaccine available against this novel virus and therefore, only supportive care is used as the mainstay of management of patients with COVID-19. The mortality rate of COVID-19 is considerable. This work aimed to provide insight on the newly emerged COVID-19, in the hope to gain a better understanding on the general overview, epidemiology, transmission, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and clinical outcomes as well as the prevention and control of COVID-19.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12985-020-01363-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7341708PMC
July 2020