Publications by authors named "Emma Hegermiller"

2 Publications

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The transcriptional repressor ID2 supports natural killer cell maturation by controlling TCF1 amplitude.

J Exp Med 2021 Jun;218(6)

Department of Pathology, Committees on Immunology and Cancer Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

Gaining a mechanistic understanding of the expansion and maturation program of natural killer (NK) cells will provide opportunities for harnessing their inflammation-inducing and oncolytic capacity for therapeutic purposes. Here, we demonstrated that ID2, a transcriptional regulatory protein constitutively expressed in NK cells, supports NK cell effector maturation by controlling the amplitude and temporal dynamics of the transcription factor TCF1. TCF1 promotes immature NK cell expansion and restrains differentiation. The increased TCF1 expression in ID2-deficient NK cells arrests their maturation and alters cell surface receptor expression. Moreover, TCF1 limits NK cell functions, such as cytokine-induced IFN-γ production and the ability to clear metastatic melanoma in ID2-deficient NK cells. Our data demonstrate that ID2 sets a threshold for TCF1 during NK cell development, thus controlling the balance of immature and terminally differentiated cells that support future NK cell responses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1084/jem.20202032DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8056751PMC
June 2021

Cabozantinib Unlocks Efficient Targeted Delivery of Neutrophil-Loaded Nanoparticles into Murine Prostate Tumors.

Mol Cancer Ther 2021 02 4;20(2):438-449. Epub 2020 Dec 4.

Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

A major barrier to the successful application of nanotechnology for cancer treatment is the suboptimal delivery of therapeutic payloads to metastatic tumor deposits. We previously discovered that cabozantinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, triggers neutrophil-mediated anticancer innate immunity, resulting in tumor regression in an aggressive PTEN/p53-deficient genetically engineered murine model of advanced prostate cancer. Here, we specifically investigated the potential of cabozantinib-induced neutrophil activation and recruitment to enhance delivery of BSA-coated polymeric nanoparticles (BSA-NPs) into murine PTEN/p53-deficient prostate tumors. On the basis of the observation that BSA coating of NPs enhanced association and internalization by activated neutrophils by approximately 6-fold , relative to uncoated NPs, we systemically injected BSA-coated, dye-loaded NPs into prostate-specific PTEN/p53-deficient mice that were pretreated with cabozantinib. Flow cytometric analysis revealed an approximately 4-fold increase of neutrophil-associated BSA-NPs and an approximately 32-fold increase in mean fluorescent dye uptake following 3 days of cabozantinib/BSA-NP administration, relative to BSA-NP alone. Strikingly, neutrophil depletion with Ly6G antibody abolished dye-loaded BSA-NP accumulation within tumors to baseline levels, demonstrating targeted neutrophil-mediated intratumoral NP delivery. Furthermore, we observed an approximately 13-fold decrease in accumulation of BSA-NPs in the liver, relative to uncoated NPs, post-cabozantinib treatment, suggesting that BSA coating of NPs can significantly enhance cabozantinib-induced, neutrophil-mediated targeted intratumoral drug delivery, while mitigating off-target toxicity. Collectively, we demonstrate a novel targeted nano-immunotherapeutic strategy for enhanced intratumoral delivery of BSA-NPs, with translational potential to significantly augment therapeutic indices of cancer medicines, thereby overcoming current pharmacologic barriers commonly encountered in preclinical/early-phase drug development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-20-0167DOI Listing
February 2021