Publications by authors named "Emily A Green"

3 Publications

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North American Fireflies Host Low Bacterial Diversity.

Microb Ecol 2021 Feb 20. Epub 2021 Feb 20.

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA.

Although there are numerous studies of firefly mating flashes, lantern bioluminescence, and anti-predation lucibufagin metabolites, almost nothing is known about their microbiome. We therefore used 16S rRNA community amplicon sequencing to characterize the gut and body microbiomes of four North American firefly taxa: Ellychnia corrusca, the Photuris versicolor species complex, Pyractomena borealis, and Pyropyga decipiens. These firefly microbiomes all have very low species diversity, often dominated by a single species, and each firefly type has a characteristic microbiome. Although the microbiomes of male and female fireflies did not differ from each other, Ph. versicolor gut and body microbiomes did, with their gut microbiomes being enriched in Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter. Ellychnia corrusca egg and adult microbiomes were unique except for a single egg microbiome that shared a community type with E. corrusca adults, which could suggest microbial transmission from mother to offspring. Mollicutes that had been previously isolated from fireflies were common in our firefly microbiomes. These results set the stage for further research concerning the function and transmission of these bacterial symbionts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00248-021-01718-7DOI Listing
February 2021

Draft Genome Sequence of Spiroplasma platyhelix ATCC 51748, Isolated from a Dragonfly.

Microbiol Resour Announc 2020 Nov 19;9(47). Epub 2020 Nov 19.

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA

is a helical bacterium belonging to the class First isolated from a dragonfly, it has the smallest reported genome size of 740 kbp. Here, we report the genome sequence of ATCC 51748.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MRA.00422-20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7679083PMC
November 2020

Blood and Blood Product Conservation: Results of Strategies to Improve Clinical Outcomes in Open Heart Surgery Patients at a Tertiary Hospital.

J Extra Corpor Technol 2017 12;49(4):273-282

Sutter Health Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Oakland, California.

Blood product usage is a quality outcome for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. To address an increase in blood product usage since the discontinuation of aprotinin, blood conservation strategies were initiated at a tertiary hospital in Oakland, CA. Improving transfusion rates for open heart surgery patients requiring Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) involved multiple departments in coordination. Specific changes to conserve blood product usage included advanced CPB technology upgrades, and precise individualized heparin dose response titration assay for heparin and protamine management. Retrospective analysis of blood product usage pre-implementation, post-CPB changes and post-Hemostasis Management System (HMS) implementation was done to determine the effectiveness of the blood conservation strategies. Statistically significant decrease in packed red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, and platelet usage over the stepped implementation of both technologies was observed. New oxygenator and centrifugal pump technologies reduced active circuitry volume and caused less damage to blood cells. Individualizing heparin and protamine dosing to a patient using the HMS led to transfusion reductions as well. Overall trends toward reductions in hospital length of stay and intensive care unit stay, and as a result, blood product cost and total hospitalization cost are positive over the period of implementation of both CPB circuit changes and HMS implementation. Although they are multifactorial in nature, these trends provide positive enforcement to the changes implemented.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5737420PMC
December 2017