Publications by authors named "Emile Tilghman-Osborne"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Reducing the Biological and Psychological Toxicity of Poverty-related Stress: Initial Efficacy of the BaSICS Intervention for Early Adolescents.

Am J Community Psychol 2020 06 11;65(3-4):305-319. Epub 2019 Oct 11.

Penn State University Harrisburg, Middletown, PA, USA.

This proof-of-concept study tests the initial efficacy of the Building a Strong Identity and Coping Skills (BaSICS) intervention, a selective prevention of internalizing problems program for early adolescents exposed to high levels of poverty-related stress. Eighty-four early adolescents (M  = 11.36 years) residing in very low-income neighborhoods were randomized to receive the 16-session intervention (n = 44) or to an assessment-only control condition (n = 40). BaSICS teaches coping skills, social identity development, and collective social action to empower youth with the ability to connect with members of their communities and cope with poverty-related stress in positive and collaborative ways. Pretest-posttest analyses showed that intervention adolescents acquired problem-solving and cognitive-restructuring skills and reduced their reliance on avoidant coping. In addition, HPA reactivity was significantly reduced in the intervention youth, but not controls. Finally, intervention youth's internalizing and somatic symptoms as reported by both youth and their parents, showed significant reductions over time, whereas control youth had no such changes. Results provide strong support for this approach to strength-building and symptom reduction in a population of early adolescents exposed to poverty-related stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajcp.12400DOI Listing
June 2020

Future Directions in Research and Intervention with Youths in Poverty.

J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol 2018 Nov-Dec;47(6):1023-1038. Epub 2018 Jul 27.

a Department of Psychology , The Pennsylvania State University.

This article aims to integrate theory and empirical findings about understanding and fostering the process of resilience and adaptation in children and families who live in poverty. In this article, we draw from multiple, somewhat distinct, scholarly streams to identify sources of protection, integrating across the literatures on stress and coping, psychophysiology, cultural identity development, and empowerment theory. Because living in poverty cuts across other dimensions of social differentiation and structural inequality, intersectionality theory frames our discussion of how to leverage poverty-affected youths' diverse experiences. We present a framework to guide intervention and research on resiliency promotion, describe the Building a Strong Identity and Coping Skills intervention stemming from the framework, and suggest possible avenues and next steps for both interventions and research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2018.1485108DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6348127PMC
September 2019

Unlocking the Black Box: A Multilevel Analysis of Preadolescent Children's Coping.

J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol 2018 Jul-Aug;47(4):527-541. Epub 2016 Mar 30.

c Department of Psychology , University of Denver.

This random assignment experimental study examined the intersection of children's coping and physiologic stress reactivity and recovery patterns in a sample of preadolescent boys and girls. A sample of 82 fourth-grade and fifth-grade (M = 10.59 years old) child-parent dyads participated in the present study. Children participated in the Trier Social Stress Test and were randomly assigned to one of two post-Trier Social Stress Test experimental coping conditions-behavioral distraction or cognitive avoidance. Children's characteristic ways of coping were examined as moderators of the effect of experimental coping condition on cortisol reactivity and recovery patterns. Multilevel modeling analyses indicated that children's characteristic coping and experimental coping condition interacted to predict differential cortisol recovery patterns. Children who characteristically engaged in primary control engagement coping strategies were able to more quickly down-regulate salivary cortisol when primed to distract themselves than when primed to avoid, and vice versa. The opposite pattern was true for characteristic disengagement coping in the context of coping condition, suggesting that regulatory fit between children's characteristic ways of coping and cues from their coping environment may lead to more and less adaptive physiologic recovery profiles. This study provides some of the first evidence that coping "gets under the skin" and that children's characteristic ways of coping may constrain or enhance a child's ability to make use of environmental coping resources.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2016.1141356DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6071424PMC
May 2019
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