Dr. Emeria Mugonzibwa, DDS, PhD, CGH, FADI - Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences - Lecturer

Dr. Emeria Mugonzibwa

DDS, PhD, CGH, FADI

Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences

Lecturer

Dar es Salaam, Dar es Salaam | Tanzania, United Republic of

Main Specialties: Dentistry

Additional Specialties: Dentistry, Orthodontics, Global Health


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Dr. Emeria Mugonzibwa, DDS, PhD, CGH, FADI - Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences - Lecturer

Dr. Emeria Mugonzibwa

DDS, PhD, CGH, FADI

Introduction

Dr. EA Mugonzibwa is a lecturer at the Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS), and is responsible for research, undergraduate orthodontics and child oral health clinical teaching and practice. She supervises research projects for undergraduate dental and some medical students. Her research interests and publications are in the areas of orthodontics, tooth emergence, caries, dental education, trauma, oral habits, temporomandibular joint(s), fluoride, cross infection and HIV. She participates in various committees and leadership opportunities in and outside the University. Currently she is the President of Rotary Club Dar es Salaam Mzizima.
A wife and proud mother of five kids (two boys and three girls) aged 23 to 33 years in a third world country without many opportunities, her scientific advancement or productivity in various directions has been slowed, although the whole situation has inspired and motivated her to work harder.
Emeria is an avid reader of various books on gardening, beauty, politics, community and charity work, international affairs, sports, cooking and general knowledge and enjoys traveling, networking and meeting new people.

Primary Affiliation: Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences - Dar es Salaam, Dar es Salaam , Tanzania, United Republic of

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Dr. Emeria Mugonzibwa’s Resume / CV

Metrics

Number of Publications

20

Publications

Number of Profile Views

220

Profile Views

Number of Article Reads

73

Reads

Number of Citations

26

Citations

Education

Apr 2004
UMC Nijmegen, Netherlands
PhD
May 1984
University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
DDS

Publications

20Publications

73Reads

26PubMed Central Citations

Diseases and conditions falsely linked with “nylon teeth” myth: a cross sectional study of Tanzanian adults.

Tanzania Journal of Health Research. 2015;17(2).

Tanzania Journal of Health Research

Background: Different communities associate children’s ailments with their developmental milestones and they have beliefs on a variety of causes of the ailments. The objective of this study was to determine the diseases and conditions falsely linked with “nylon teeth” myth among Tanzanian adults. Methods: A cross sectional cluster study was conducted in five zones of Tanzania. A total of 200 individuals from each region stratified by age and sex were targeted. Study subjects included adults of child bearing age, elders, health care workers, teachers and traditional healers. A structured questionnaire was used to inquire for the demographic characteristics of the participants as well as diseases and conditions falsely linked with the nylon teeth myth. Results: A total of 1,359 people participated in the study. Of the total participants, 262 (19.3%) reported nylon teeth myth to exist in their locality. The main symptoms that were falsely linked with nylon teeth myth were diarrhoea (83.5%), long standing fevers (81.2%) and difficult in sucking (76.7%). Respondents less likely to falsely link nylon teeth myth with various diseases and conditions were residents in southern regions. They linked nylon teeth myth with diarrhoea (OR=0.29, CI=0.14-0.63), fevers (OR=0.38, CI=0.18-0.80), cough (OR=0.38, CI=0.16-0.94), stunting (OR=0.24, CI=0.10-0.58), excessive crying (OR=0.19, CI=0.09-0.40) and difficult sucking (OR=0.35 CI=0.17-0.70). Males linked the myth with stunting (OR=0.57, CI= 0.34-0.98) and excessive crying (OR 0.431, CI=0.24-0.78). The more educated respondents linked the myth with long standing cough (OR=2.068, CI=1.11-3.84) and stunting (OR=2.07, CI=1.10-3.76). The health care workers less likely linked nylon teeth with excessive crying (OR=0.37, CI=0.15-0.96) and difficult sucking (OR=0.29, CI=0.11-0.81). Conclusion: Diarrhoea, fevers and difficult in sucking were the symptoms most frequently linked with nylon teeth myth. Linking of the symptoms and the myth was more common among respondents from northern regions, non – medics, males and the more educated ones. Educational and behavioural change intervention against the diseases frequently falsely linked with nylon teeth myth is recommended to control the myth.

View Article
January 2018
4 Reads

Maximal Mandibular Movements among Tanzanian Children.

Authors:
Mugonzibwa EA

IJRDO-Journal of Health Sciences and Nursing: Volume-2 | Issue-6 | 18-29

IJRDO-Journal of Health Sciences and Nursing

Abstract Aim: To determine the maximal mandibular movements among Tanzanian children. Subjects and Methods: Analysis of archived data from 869 subjects aged 3½ -16 years of whom 51% were girls. The emergence status of the permanent teeth was determined and classified into four categories. The study variables were maximal mandibular movement capacity vertically, in laterotrusion and protrusion. Results: The mean maximum mandibular opening ranged from 43.8 to 55.8 mm between emergence stages of the dentition. The mean values for maximal mandibular movements in laterotrusion and protrusion ranged between 6.3 mm and 7.9 mm at the lowest and highest emergence stage among girls and boys. The mean of the maximum mandibular opening for both sexes increased with the emergence stage of the dentition. Conclusion: Sex and emergence stage of the dentition had significant influences on mandibular maximum opening, laterotrusion and protrusion. Similar studies on maximal mandibular movements in different Tanzanian children strata are recommended.

View Article
January 2018
7 Reads

Current status of nylon teeth myth in Tanzania: a cross sectional study.

BMC oral health. 2018;18(1):9.

BMC oral health

Abstract Background Nylon teeth myth is a belief of associating infant illnesses with bulges on infants’ alveolus that mark the positions of underlying developing teeth and that it is necessary to treat the condition mainly by traditional healers to prevent infant death. The traditional treatment often leads to serious complications that may lead to infant death. Although the government instituted educational campaigns against the myth in 1980s to 1990s, to date, repeated unpublished reports from different parts of the country indicate continued existence of the myth. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the current status of the nylon teeth myth in Tanzania. Methods The study population was obtained using the WHO Oral Health pathfinder methodology. A structured questionnaire inquired about socio-demographics as well as experiences with “nylon teeth” myth and its related practices. Odds ratios relating to knowledge and experience of the nylon teeth myth were estimated. Results A total of 1359 respondents aged 17 to 80 years participated in the study. 614 (45%) have heard of nylon teeth myth, of whom 46.1% believed that nylon teeth is a reality, and 42.7% reported existence of the myth at the time of study. Being residents in regions where nylon teeth myth was known before 1990 (OR = 8.39 (6.50–10.83), p < 0.001) and/or hospital worker (OR = 2.97 (1.99–4.42), p < 0.001) were associated with having have heard of nylon teeth myth. Proportionately more residents in regions where nylon teeth myth was not known before 1990 (p < 0.001), the educated (p < 0.001) and hospital workers (p < 0.001) believed modern medicine, whereas, proportionately more residents in regions where nylon teeth was known before 1990 (p < 0.001), less educated (p < 0.001) and non-hospital workers (p < 0.001) believed traditional medicine to be the best treatment for symptoms related to nylon teeth myth respectively. Conclusion The “nylon teeth” myth still exists in Tanzania; a substantial proportion strongly believe in the myth and consider traditional medicine the best treatment of the myth related conditions.

View Article
January 2018
4 Reads

Cytoprotective responses in HaCaT keratinocytes exposed to high doses of curcumin.

Exp Cell Res 2015 Aug 10;336(2):298-307. Epub 2015 Jun 10.

Department of Orthodontics and Craniofacial Biology, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud university medical center, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

View Article
August 2015
6 Reads
3.250 Impact Factor

Curcumin induces differential expression of cytoprotective enzymes but similar apoptotic responses in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts.

Exp Cell Res 2015 Jan 17;330(2):429-41. Epub 2014 Oct 17.

Department of Orthodontics and Craniofacial Biology, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

View Article
January 2015
9 Reads
2 Citations
3.250 Impact Factor

Third molars emergence status among 15 to 16 year-old Tanzanian youths.

Authors:
E A Mugonzibwa

Odontostomatol Trop 2014 Sep;37(147):43-50

View Article
September 2014
4 Reads

Risk factors for injuries to maxillary permanent incisors and upper lip among schoolchildren in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

Int J Paediatr Dent 2009 Mar 4;19(2):148-54. Epub 2008 Jul 4.

School of Dentistry, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

View Article
March 2009
4 Reads
1.540 Impact Factor

Spacing and crowding among African and Caucasian children.

Orthod Craniofac Res 2008 May;11(2):82-9

Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences (MUCHS), Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.

View Article
May 2008
3 Reads
2 Citations
1.290 Impact Factor

Occlusal characteristics during different emergence stages of the permanent dentition in Tanzanian Bantu and finnish children.

Eur J Orthod 2004 Jun;26(3):251-60

Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

View Article
June 2004
6 Reads
1 Citation
1.390 Impact Factor

Perceptions of dental attractiveness and orthodontic treatment need among Tanzanian children.

Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2004 Apr;125(4):426-33; discussion 433-4

Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

View Article
April 2004
5 Reads
9 Citations
1.440 Impact Factor

Comparison between the opinions of Tanzanian parents and their children on dental attractiveness.

Angle Orthod 2004 Feb;74(1):63-70

Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

View Article
February 2004
4 Reads
3 Citations
1.280 Impact Factor

Need for orthodontic treatment among Tanzanian children.

East Afr Med J 2004 Jan;81(1):10-5

Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

View Article
January 2004
2 Reads
1 Citation

Demand for orthodontic treatment among 9-18 year-olds seeking dental care in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania.

East Afr Med J 2004 Jan;81(1):3-9

Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

View Article
January 2004
4 Reads
1 Citation

Emergence of permanent teeth in Tanzanian children.

Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2002 Dec;30(6):455-62

Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

View Article
December 2002
5 Reads
5 Citations
2.020 Impact Factor

Factors influencing career choice among high school students in Tanzania.

J Dent Educ 2000 Jun;64(6):423-9

Faculty of Dentistry, Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences, Tanzania.

View Article
June 2000
3 Reads
1.040 Impact Factor

Tanzanian high school students' attitude towards five university professional courses.

East Afr Med J 2000 Mar;77(3):143-6

Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences, University of Dar es Salaam, P.O. Box 65014, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

View Article
March 2000
5 Reads
2 Citations

Occlusal survey in a group of Tanzanian adults.

Authors:
E A Mugonzibwa

Afr Dent J 1993 ;7:6-10

Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

View Article
August 1998
3 Reads

Variations in occlusal and space characteristics in a series of 6-18-year olds, in Ilala District, Tanzania.

Authors:
E A Mugonzibwa

Afr Dent J 1992 ;6:17-22

Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Muhimbili College of Medical Sciences, Dar es salaam, Tanzania.

View Article
May 1994
4 Reads

Knowledge of AIDS and HIV infection displayed by Tanzanian operating dental staff in 1988 and 1989: a follow-up study.

Community Dent Health 1992 Mar;9(1):63-8

Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.

View Article
March 1992
3 Reads
0.870 Impact Factor

Occlusal and space characteristics among 12-year-old school children in Bukoba and Moshi, Tanzania.

Afr Dent J 1990 ;4(1-5):6-10

Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Muhimbili Medical Centre, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

View Article
November 1991
3 Reads