Publications by authors named "Eman M Abd-Ella"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Immunomodulatory effects of bee pollen on doxorubicin-induced bone marrow/spleen immunosuppression in rat.

J Food Biochem 2021 Jun 5;45(6):e13747. Epub 2021 May 5.

Zoology Department, College of Science, Fayoum University, Fayoum, Egypt.

This study investigated the immunomodulatory effects of Bee Pollen (BP) on Doxorubicin (DOX)-induced bone marrow/spleen suppression in rats. 48 Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups (n = 8/group); control, DOX (5 mg/kg), BP (100 mg/kg), BP (200 mg/kg), BP (100 mg/kg) +DOX, and BP (200 mg/kg) +DOX groups. BP was administered orally for 42 days and 5 mg/kg of DOX was injected intravenously at days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42. Hematological parameters, antioxidant enzymes and inflammatory cytokines were measured. Apoptosis-related genes were investigated using Real-Time PCR and western blot. DOX significantly decreased blood cells count, cytokines, and antioxidant enzyme. It also increased the expression of apoptotic genes in spleen and BM. The BP significantly improved hematopoietic function, antioxidant parameters, and serum levels of hematopoietic simulating-cytokines. Also, BP significantly reduced the expression of apoptotic genes. These results confirm the immunomodulatory activity of BP in DOX-induced biochemical, molecular and histological immunosuppression. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS: Chemotherapy drugs are being developed every day but are limited due to their side effects. The most important side effect of chemotherapy drugs is the suppression of hematopoiesis through its direct effect on bone marrow and hematopoietic cells. Today, many studies are done on natural, synthetic and semi-synthetic compounds to reduce the effects of chemotherapy drugs. Compounds that, along with chemotherapy drugs in the treatment of various tumors, maintain the hematopoietic pathway, synergize the antitumor effects of chemotherapy drugs, and also protect other organs of the body from free radical damage produced by chemotherapy drugs. One of these natural compounds is bee pollen, which has all the properties mentioned in chemotherapy supplements and can be used in the pharmaceutical industry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfbc.13747DOI Listing
June 2021

Origanum vulgare L. leaves extract alleviates testis and sperm damages induced by finasteride: Biochemical, Immunohistological and apoptosis genes based evidences.

Andrologia 2020 Dec 23;52(11):e13823. Epub 2020 Sep 23.

Zoology Department, College of Science, Fayoum University, Fayoum, Egypt.

The aim of the current study was to investigate antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of Origanum vulgare on finasteride-induced oxidative injury in mouse testis and sperm parameters. Thirty BALB/c mice were divided into 5 groups: negative control, received 0.5 ml/day distilled water; positive control, received 25 mg/kg finasteride orally; and three groups received 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg/day O. vulgare extract plus 25 mg kg  day finasteride for 35 days. At day 36, serum luteinising hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone, inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β), glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and nitric oxide levels were assessed. Also, apoptotic changes investigated through genes expression and immunohistochemical staining. Finasteride in 35 days resulted in significant destructive alterations in the testis architecture, suppressed antioxidant enzymes and increased lipid peroxidation. The expression of Bcl-2 was down-regulated, whereas p53 and caspase-3 were up-regulated. Origanum vulgare improved the serum level of hormones and restored the antioxidant defence. 200 and 400 mg/kg/day of O. vulgare alleviated the testis structure and sperm parameters, up-regulated the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2 and down-regulated the p53, caspase-3 genes in treated groups. The findings indicate that O. vulgare extract improved function and structure of testis tissue against finasteride-induced testicular toxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/and.13823DOI Listing
December 2020

The Possible Neuroprotective Effect of Silymarin against Aluminum Chloride-Prompted Alzheimer's-Like Disease in Rats.

Brain Sci 2020 Sep 11;10(9). Epub 2020 Sep 11.

Department of Biological and Geological Sciences, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566, Egypt.

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a worldwide rapidly growing neurodegenerative disease. Here, we elucidated the neuroprotective effects of silymarin (SM) on the hippocampal tissues of aluminum chloride (AlCl)-induced Alzheimer-like disease in rats using biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural approaches. Forty rats were divided into control, SM, AlCl, and AlCl + SM groups. Biochemically, AlCl administration resulted in marked elevation in levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitric oxide (NO) and decrease in levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Moreover, AlCl significantly increased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities. Furthermore, myriad histological and ultrastructural alterations were recorded in the hippocampal tissues of AlCl-treated rats represented as marked degenerative changes of pyramidal neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Additionally, some myelinated nerve fibers exhibited irregular arrangement of their myelin coats, while the others revealed focal degranulation of their myelin sheaths. Severe defects in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) were also recorded. However, co-administration of SM with AlCl reversed most of the biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural changes triggered by AlCl in rats. The results of the current study indicate that SM can potentially mend most of the previously evoked neuronal damage in the hippocampal tissues of AlCl-kindled rats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10090628DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7564174PMC
September 2020