Publications by authors named "Els van Rossem"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Exonic deletions in AUTS2 cause a syndromic form of intellectual disability and suggest a critical role for the C terminus.

Am J Hum Genet 2013 Feb 17;92(2):210-20. Epub 2013 Jan 17.

Department of Clinical Genetics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam 1007 MB, The Netherlands.

Genomic rearrangements involving AUTS2 (7q11.22) are associated with autism and intellectual disability (ID), although evidence for causality is limited. By combining the results of diagnostic testing of 49,684 individuals, we identified 24 microdeletions that affect at least one exon of AUTS2, as well as one translocation and one inversion each with a breakpoint within the AUTS2 locus. Comparison of 17 well-characterized individuals enabled identification of a variable syndromic phenotype including ID, autism, short stature, microcephaly, cerebral palsy, and facial dysmorphisms. The dysmorphic features were more pronounced in persons with 3'AUTS2 deletions. This part of the gene is shown to encode a C-terminal isoform (with an alternative transcription start site) expressed in the human brain. Consistent with our genetic data, suppression of auts2 in zebrafish embryos caused microcephaly that could be rescued by either the full-length or the C-terminal isoform of AUTS2. Our observations demonstrate a causal role of AUTS2 in neurocognitive disorders, establish a hitherto unappreciated syndromic phenotype at this locus, and show how transcriptional complexity can underpin human pathology. The zebrafish model provides a valuable tool for investigating the etiology of AUTS2 syndrome and facilitating gene-function analysis in the future.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.12.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3567268PMC
February 2013

Congenital anterolateral bowing of the tibia with ipsilateral polydactyly of the great toe associated with cerebral cyst: a new entity?

Clin Dysmorphol 2009 Oct;18(4):195-200

Center for Human Genetics, Department of Pediatric Neurology, University Hospital Leuven, Belgium.

We present two patients with congenital anterolateral bowing of the tibia with polydactyly who had, in addition, cerebral malformations including agenesis of the corpus callosum and a large cerebral cyst. We discuss phenotypic overlap with the acrocallosal syndrome.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MCD.0b013e32832d06d7DOI Listing
October 2009