Publications by authors named "Elly Verbeek"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Progressive leukoencephalopathy impairs neurobehavioral development in sialin-deficient mice.

Exp Neurol 2017 05 9;291:106-119. Epub 2017 Feb 9.

Laboratory of Biological Psychology, KU Leuven, Belgium.

Slc17a5 mice represent an animal model for the infantile form of sialic acid storage disease (SASD). We analyzed genetic and histological time-course expression of myelin and oligodendrocyte (OL) lineage markers in different parts of the CNS, and related this to postnatal neurobehavioral development in these mice. Sialin-deficient mice display a distinct spatiotemporal pattern of sialic acid storage, CNS hypomyelination and leukoencephalopathy. Whereas few genes are differentially expressed in the perinatal stage (p0), microarray analysis revealed increased differential gene expression in later postnatal stages (p10-p18). This included progressive upregulation of neuroinflammatory genes, as well as continuous down-regulation of genes that encode myelin constituents and typical OL lineage markers. Age-related histopathological analysis indicates that initial myelination occurs normally in hindbrain regions, but progression to more frontal areas is affected in Slc17a5 mice. This course of progressive leukoencephalopathy and CNS hypomyelination delays neurobehavioral development in sialin-deficient mice. Slc17a5 mice successfully achieve early neurobehavioral milestones, but exhibit progressive delay of later-stage sensory and motor milestones. The present findings may contribute to further understanding of the processes of CNS myelination as well as help to develop therapeutic strategies for SASD and other myelination disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.expneurol.2017.02.009DOI Listing
May 2017

RTTN mutations link primary cilia function to organization of the human cerebral cortex.

Am J Hum Genet 2012 Sep 30;91(3):533-40. Epub 2012 Aug 30.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Erasmus University Medical Center (Erasmus MC), P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Polymicrogyria is a malformation of the developing cerebral cortex caused by abnormal organization and characterized by many small gyri and fusion of the outer molecular layer. We have identified autosomal-recessive mutations in RTTN, encoding Rotatin, in individuals with bilateral diffuse polymicrogyria from two separate families. Rotatin determines early embryonic axial rotation, as well as anteroposterior and dorsoventral patterning in the mouse. Human Rotatin has recently been identified as a centrosome-associated protein. The Drosophila melanogaster homolog of Rotatin, Ana3, is needed for structural integrity of centrioles and basal bodies and maintenance of sensory neurons. We show that Rotatin colocalizes with the basal bodies at the primary cilium. Cultured fibroblasts from affected individuals have structural abnormalities of the cilia and exhibit downregulation of BMP4, WNT5A, and WNT2B, which are key regulators of cortical patterning and are expressed at the cortical hem, the cortex-organizing center that gives rise to Cajal-Retzius (CR) neurons. Interestingly, we have shown that in mouse embryos, Rotatin colocalizes with CR neurons at the subpial marginal zone. Knockdown experiments in human fibroblasts and neural stem cells confirm a role for RTTN in cilia structure and function. RTTN mutations therefore link aberrant ciliary function to abnormal development and organization of the cortex in human individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.07.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3511998PMC
September 2012

COL4A2 mutation associated with familial porencephaly and small-vessel disease.

Eur J Hum Genet 2012 Aug 15;20(8):844-51. Epub 2012 Feb 15.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Familial porencephaly, leukoencephalopathy and small-vessel disease belong to the spectrum of disorders ascribed to dominant mutations in the gene encoding for type IV collagen alpha-1 (COL4A1). Mice harbouring mutations in either Col4a1 or Col4a2 suffer from porencephaly, hydrocephalus, cerebral and ocular bleeding and developmental defects. We observed porencephaly and white matter lesions in members from two families that lack COL4A1 mutations. We hypothesized that COL4A2 mutations confer genetic predisposition to porencephaly, therefore we sequenced COL4A2 in the family members and characterized clinical, neuroradiological and biochemical phenotypes. Genomic sequencing of COL4A2 identified the heterozygous missense G1389R in exon 44 in one family and the c.3206delC change in exon 34 leading to frame shift and premature stop, in the second family. Fragmentation and duplication of epidermal basement membranes were observed by electron microscopy in a c.3206delC patient skin biopsy, consistent with abnormal collagen IV network. Collagen chain accumulation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress have been proposed as cellular mechanism in COL4A1 mutations. In COL4A2 (3206delC) fibroblasts we detected increased rates of apoptosis and no signs of ER stress. Mutation phenotypes varied, including porencephaly, white matter lesions, cerebellar and optic nerve hypoplasia and unruptured carotid aneurysm. In the second family however, we found evidence for additional factors contributing to the phenotype. We conclude that dominant COL4A2 mutations are a novel major risk factor for familial cerebrovascular disease, including porencephaly and small-vessel disease with reduced penetrance and variable phenotype, which might also be modified by other contributing factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ejhg.2012.20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3400734PMC
August 2012

COL4A1 mutation in two preterm siblings with antenatal onset of parenchymal hemorrhage.

Ann Neurol 2009 Jan;65(1):12-8

Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, UMC Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Objective: To report the presence of intracerebral hemorrhage and porencephaly, both present at birth, in two preterm infants with a mutation in the collagen 4 A1 gene.

Methods: Two preterm infants with antenatal intracerebral hemorrhage and established porencephaly, as well as their affected mother and grandfather, underwent neurological and ophthalmological examination and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Mutation analysis of the COL4A1 gene was performed in the infants and in their mother.

Results: Both infants had a novel G1580R mutation in the COL4A1 gene, encoding procollagen type IV alpha1. A history of mild antenatal trauma was present in the first but not in the second infant. Both preterm infants were asymptomatic at birth. The intracerebral hemorrhage and porencephaly were diagnosed with cranial ultrasound examination and were subsequently confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging. Leukoencephalopathy was present in the mother and in her father.

Interpretation: Mutation of the COL4A1 gene appears to be a risk factor of antenatal intracerebral hemorrhage followed by porencephaly in the preterm newborn.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.21525DOI Listing
January 2009

Sialin, an anion transporter defective in sialic acid storage diseases, shows highly variable expression in adult mouse brain, and is developmentally regulated.

Neurobiol Dis 2005 Aug;19(3):351-65

Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria 3052, Australia.

Sialin is a lysosomal membrane protein encoded by the SLC17A5 gene, which is mutated in patients with sialic acid storage diseases (SASD). To further understand the role of sialin in normal CNS development and in the progressive neuronal atrophy and dysmyelination seen in SASD, we investigated its normal cellular distribution in adult and developing mice. Overall, sialin showed granular immunoreactivity, consistent with a vesicular protein. Adult mice showed widespread sialin expression, including in the brain, heart, lung, and liver. High-level immunoreactivity was seen in the neuropil of the hippocampus, striatum, and cerebral cortex, as well as in the perikarya of cerebellar Purkinje cells, globus pallidus, and certain thalamic and brainstem nuclei. In mouse embryos, the highest levels of expression were observed in the nervous system. We discuss the possible role of sialin in normal development and in SASD pathogenesis, as a framework for further investigation of its function in these contexts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nbd.2004.12.020DOI Listing
August 2005