Publications by authors named "Elly Morriën"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Amsterdam Research Initiative for Sub-surface Taphonomy and Anthropology (ARISTA) - A taphonomic research facility in the Netherlands for the study of human remains.

Forensic Sci Int 2020 Dec 6;317:110483. Epub 2020 Sep 6.

Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam University Medical Centers - location Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 15, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam, P.O.Box 22660, 1100 DD, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; CLHC-Amsterdam Center for Forensic Science and Medicine, Science Park - Building 904 (Room C2.243), 1098 XH, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

A taphonomic research facility for the study of human remains was recently realized in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, to systematically investigate the decomposition of the human body under known conditions. Governmental authorization was obtained to make use of the body donation program of the Amsterdam University Medical Centers, location Academic Medical Center, for this specific purpose. In contrast to the small number of comparable initiatives elsewhere, this facility specifically allows for the study of buried bodies e.g. with the use of telemetry and remote sensing. Here, we discuss the concept of body donation in the Netherlands, its role in taphonomic research, and the sequence of events that preceded the realization of this facility, which is the first of its kind in Europe. In addition to offering novel research options to the scientific community, we hope that it will also pave the way for the successful realization of similar initiatives in other locations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.forsciint.2020.110483DOI Listing
December 2020

Publisher Correction: Successional trajectory of bacterial communities in soil are shaped by plant-driven changes during secondary succession.

Sci Rep 2020 Jul 7;10(1):11461. Epub 2020 Jul 7.

School of Computational and Integrative Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, 110067, India.

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-68560-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7338417PMC
July 2020

Successional trajectory of bacterial communities in soil are shaped by plant-driven changes during secondary succession.

Sci Rep 2020 06 17;10(1):9864. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

School of Computational and Integrative Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, 110067, India.

This study investigated the potential role of a nitrogen-fixing early-coloniser Alnus Nepalensis D. Don (alder) in driving the changes in soil bacterial communities during secondary succession. We found that bacterial diversity was positively associated with alder growth during course of ecosystem development. Alder development elicited multiple changes in bacterial community composition and ecological networks. For example, the initial dominance of actinobacteria within bacterial community transitioned to the dominance of proteobacteria with stand development. Ecological networks approximating species associations tend to stabilize with alder growth. Janthinobacterium lividum, Candidatus Xiphinematobacter and Rhodoplanes were indicator species of different growth stages of alder. While the growth stages of alder has a major independent contribution to the bacterial diversity, its influence on the community composition was explained conjointly by the changes in soil properties with alder. Alder growth increased trace mineral element concentrations in the soil and explained 63% of variance in the Shannon-diversity. We also found positive association of alder with late-successional Quercus leucotrichophora (Oak). Together, the changes in soil bacterial community shaped by early-coloniser alder and its positive association with late-successional oak suggests a crucial role played by alder in ecosystem recovery of degraded habitats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-66638-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7299987PMC
June 2020

The long-term restoration of ecosystem complexity.

Nat Ecol Evol 2020 05 13;4(5):676-685. Epub 2020 Apr 13.

Centre for Biodiversity Theory and Modelling, Theoretical and Experimental Ecology Station, CNRS, 2 route du CNRS, Moulis, France.

Multiple large-scale restoration strategies are emerging globally to counteract ecosystem degradation and biodiversity loss. However, restoration often remains insufficient to offset that loss. To address this challenge, we propose to focus restoration science on the long-term (centuries to millennia) re-assembly of degraded ecosystem complexity integrating interaction network and evolutionary potential approaches. This approach provides insights into eco-evolutionary feedbacks determining the structure, functioning and stability of recovering ecosystems. Eco-evolutionary feedbacks may help to understand changes in the adaptive potential after disturbance of metacommunity hub species with core structural and functional roles for their use in restoration. Those changes can be studied combining a restoration genomics approach based on whole-genome sequencing with replicated space-for-time substitutions linking changes in genetic variation to functions or traits relevant to the establishment of evolutionarily resilient communities. This approach may set the knowledge basis for future tools to accelerate the restoration of ecosystems able to adapt to ongoing global changes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41559-020-1154-1DOI Listing
May 2020

Network Analyses Can Advance Above-Belowground Ecology.

Trends Plant Sci 2018 09 30;23(9):759-768. Epub 2018 Jul 30.

Department of Terrestrial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), P.O. Box 50, 6700 AB, Wageningen, The Netherlands; Laboratory of Nematology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8123, 6700 ES, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

An understanding of above-belowground (AG-BG) ecology is important for evaluating how plant interactions with enemies, symbionts, and decomposers affect species diversity and will respond to global changes. However, research questions and experiments often focus on only a limited number of interactions, creating an incomplete picture of how entire communities may be involved in AG-BG community ecology. Therefore, a pressing challenge is to formulate hypotheses of AG-BG interactions when considering communities in their full complexity. Here we discuss how network analyses can be a powerful tool to progress AG-BG research, link across scales from individual to community and ecosystem, visualize community interactions between the two (AG and BG) subsystems, and develop testable hypotheses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tplants.2018.06.009DOI Listing
September 2018

Shifts in rhizosphere fungal community during secondary succession following abandonment from agriculture.

ISME J 2017 10 6;11(10):2294-2304. Epub 2017 Jun 6.

Department of Microbial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Activities of rhizosphere microbes are key to the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. It is commonly believed that bacteria are the major consumers of root exudates and that the role of fungi in the rhizosphere is mostly limited to plant-associated taxa, such as mycorrhizal fungi, pathogens and endophytes, whereas less is known about the role of saprotrophs. In order to test the hypothesis that the role of saprotrophic fungi in rhizosphere processes increases with increased time after abandonment from agriculture, we determined the composition of fungi that are active in the rhizosphere along a chronosequence of ex-arable fields in the Netherlands. Intact soil cores were collected from nine fields that represent three stages of land abandonment and pulse labeled with CO. The fungal contribution to metabolization of plant-derived carbon was evaluated using phospholipid analysis combined with stable isotope probing (SIP), whereas fungal diversity was analyzed using DNA-SIP combined with 454-sequencing. We show that in recently abandoned fields most of the root-derived C was taken up by bacteria but that in long-term abandoned fields most of the root-derived C was found in fungal biomass. Furthermore, the composition of the active functional fungal community changed from one composed of fast-growing and pathogenic fungal species to one consisting of beneficial and slower-growing fungal species, which may have essential consequences for the carbon flow through the soil food web and consequently nutrient cycling and plant succession.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2017.90DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5607372PMC
October 2017

Soil networks become more connected and take up more carbon as nature restoration progresses.

Nat Commun 2017 02 8;8:14349. Epub 2017 Feb 8.

NIOO-KNAW, Microbial Ecology, Droevendaalsesteeg 10, Wageningen 6708 PB, The Netherlands.

Soil organisms have an important role in aboveground community dynamics and ecosystem functioning in terrestrial ecosystems. However, most studies have considered soil biota as a black box or focussed on specific groups, whereas little is known about entire soil networks. Here we show that during the course of nature restoration on abandoned arable land a compositional shift in soil biota, preceded by tightening of the belowground networks, corresponds with enhanced efficiency of carbon uptake. In mid- and long-term abandoned field soil, carbon uptake by fungi increases without an increase in fungal biomass or shift in bacterial-to-fungal ratio. The implication of our findings is that during nature restoration the efficiency of nutrient cycling and carbon uptake can increase by a shift in fungal composition and/or fungal activity. Therefore, we propose that relationships between soil food web structure and carbon cycling in soils need to be reconsidered.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14349DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5309817PMC
February 2017

Herbivory and dominance shifts among exotic and congeneric native plant species during plant community establishment.

Oecologia 2016 Feb;180(2):507-17

Invasive exotic plant species often have fewer natural enemies and suffer less damage from herbivores in their new range than genetically or functionally related species that are native to that area. Although we might expect that having fewer enemies would promote the invasiveness of the introduced exotic plant species due to reduced enemy exposure, few studies have actually analyzed the ecological consequences of this situation in the field. Here, we examined how exposure to aboveground herbivores influences shifts in dominance among exotic and phylogenetically related native plant species in a riparian ecosystem during early establishment of invaded communities. We planted ten plant communities each consisting of three individuals of each of six exotic plant species as well as six phylogenetically related natives. Exotic plant species were selected based on a rapid recent increase in regional abundance, the presence of a congeneric native species, and their co-occurrence in the riparian ecosystem. All plant communities were covered by tents with insect mesh. Five tents were open on the leeward side to allow herbivory. The other five tents were completely closed in order to exclude insects and vertebrates. Herbivory reduced aboveground biomass by half and influenced which of the plant species dominated the establishing communities. Exposure to herbivory did not reduce the total biomass of natives more than that of exotics, so aboveground herbivory did not selectively enhance exotics during this early stage of plant community development. Effects of herbivores on plant biomass depended on plant species or genus but not on plant status (i.e., exotic vs native). Thus, aboveground herbivory did not promote the dominance of exotic plant species during early establishment of the phylogenetically balanced plant communities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-015-3472-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4723625PMC
February 2016

Additive effects of aboveground polyphagous herbivores and soil feedback in native and range-expanding exotic plants.

Ecology 2011 Jun;92(6):1344-52

Department of Terrestrial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), P.O. Box 50, 6700 AB Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Plant biomass and plant abundance can be controlled by aboveground and belowground natural enemies. However, little is known about how the aboveground and belowground enemy effects may add up. We exposed 15 plant species to aboveground polyphagous insect herbivores and feedback effects from the soil community alone, as well as in combination. We envisaged three possibilities: additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effects of the aboveground and belowground enemies on plant biomass. In our analysis, we included native and phylogenetically related range-expanding exotic plant species, because exotic plants on average are less sensitive to aboveground herbivores and soil feedback than related natives. Thus, we examined if lower sensitivity of exotic plant species to enemies also alters aboveground-belowground interactions. In a greenhouse experiment, we exposed six exotic and nine native plant species to feedback from their own soil communities, aboveground herbivory by polyphagous insects, or a combination of soil feedback and aboveground insects and compared shoot and root biomass to control plants without aboveground and belowground enemies. We observed that for both native and range-expanding exotic plant species effects of insect herbivory aboveground and soil feedback added up linearly, instead of enforcing or counteracting each other. However, there was no correlation between the strength of aboveground herbivory and soil feedback. We conclude that effects of polyphagous aboveground herbivorous insects and soil feedback add up both in the case of native and related range-expanding exotic plant species, but that aboveground herbivory effects may not necessarily predict the strengths of soil feedback effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/10-1937.1DOI Listing
June 2011

Climate change and invasion by intracontinental range-expanding exotic plants: the role of biotic interactions.

Ann Bot 2010 Jun 30;105(6):843-8. Epub 2010 Mar 30.

Department of Terrestrial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, Heteren, The Netherlands.

Background And Aims: In this Botanical Briefing we describe how the interactions between plants and their biotic environment can change during range-expansion within a continent and how this may influence plant invasiveness.

Scope: We address how mechanisms explaining intercontinental plant invasions by exotics (such as release from enemies) may also apply to climate-warming-induced range-expanding exotics within the same continent. We focus on above-ground and below-ground interactions of plants, enemies and symbionts, on plant defences, and on nutrient cycling.

Conclusions: Range-expansion by plants may result in above-ground and below-ground enemy release. This enemy release can be due to the higher dispersal capacity of plants than of natural enemies. Moreover, lower-latitudinal plants can have higher defence levels than plants from temperate regions, making them better defended against herbivory. In a world that contains fewer enemies, exotic plants will experience less selection pressure to maintain high levels of defensive secondary metabolites. Range-expanders potentially affect ecosystem processes, such as nutrient cycling. These features are quite comparable with what is known of intercontinental invasive exotic plants. However, intracontinental range-expanding plants will have ongoing gene-flow between the newly established populations and the populations in the native range. This is a major difference from intercontinental invasive exotic plants, which become more severely disconnected from their source populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcq064DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2876007PMC
June 2010

Successful range-expanding plants experience less above-ground and below-ground enemy impact.

Nature 2008 Dec 19;456(7224):946-8. Epub 2008 Nov 19.

Department of Multitrophic Interactions, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), PO Box 40, 6666 ZG Heteren, The Netherlands.

Many species are currently moving to higher latitudes and altitudes. However, little is known about the factors that influence the future performance of range-expanding species in their new habitats. Here we show that range-expanding plant species from a riverine area were better defended against shoot and root enemies than were related native plant species growing in the same area. We grew fifteen plant species with and without non-coevolved polyphagous locusts and cosmopolitan, polyphagous aphids. Contrary to our expectations, the locusts performed more poorly on the range-expanding plant species than on the congeneric native plant species, whereas the aphids showed no difference. The shoot herbivores reduced the biomass of the native plants more than they did that of the congeneric range expanders. Also, the range-expanding plants developed fewer pathogenic effects in their root-zone soil than did the related native species. Current predictions forecast biodiversity loss due to limitations in the ability of species to adjust to climate warming conditions in their range. Our results strongly suggest that the plants that shift ranges towards higher latitudes and altitudes may include potential invaders, as the successful range expanders may experience less control by above-ground or below-ground enemies than the natives.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature07474DOI Listing
December 2008

Spatial population structure of a specialist leaf-mining moth.

J Anim Ecol 2008 Jul 14;77(4):757-67. Epub 2008 Apr 14.

Metapopulation Research Group, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, PO Box 65, Viikinkaari 1, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland.

1. The spatial structure of natural populations may profoundly influence their dynamics. Depending on the frequency of movements among local populations and the consequent balance between local and regional population processes, earlier work has attempted to classify metapopulations into clear-cut categories, ranging from patchy populations to sets of remnant populations. In an alternative, dichotomous scheme, local populations have been classified as self-sustaining populations generating a surplus of individuals (sources) and those depending on immigration for persistence (sinks). 2. In this paper, we describe the spatial population structure of the leaf-mining moth Tischeria ekebladella, a specialist herbivore of the pedunculate oak Quercus robur. We relate moth dispersal to the distribution of oaks on Wattkast, a small island (5 km(2)) off the south-western coast of Finland. 3. We build a spatially realistic metapopulation model derived from assumptions concerning the behaviour of individual moths, and show that the model is able to explain part of the variation in observed patterns of occurrence and colonization. 4. While the species was always present on large trees, a considerable proportion of the local populations associated with small oaks showed extinction-recolonization dynamics. The vast majority of moth individuals occur on large trees. 5. According to model predictions, the dominance of local vs. regional processes in tree-specific moth dynamics varies drastically across the landscape. Most local populations may be defined broadly as 'sinks', as model simulations suggest that in the absence of immigration, only the largest oaks will sustain viable moth populations. Large trees in areas of high oak density will contribute most to the overall persistence of the metapopulation by acting as sources of moths colonizing other trees. 6. No single 'metapopulation type' will suffice to describe the oak-moth system. Instead, our study supports the notion that real populations are often a mix of earlier identified categories. The level to which local populations may persist after landscape modification will vary across the landscape, and sweeping classifications of metapopulations into single categories will contribute little to understanding how individual local populations contribute to the overall persistence of the system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2656.2008.01396.xDOI Listing
July 2008

Resource selection by female moths in a heterogeneous environment: what is a poor girl to do?

J Anim Ecol 2007 Sep;76(5):854-65

Metapopulation Research Group, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, PO Box 65 (Viikinkaari 1), FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland.

1. According to the preference-performance hypothesis, female insects select resources that maximize offspring performance. To achieve high fitness, leaf miner females should then adjust their oviposition behaviour in response to leaf attributes signalling high host quality. 2. Here we investigate resource selection in Tischeria ekebladella, a leaf-mining moth of the pedunculate oak (Quercus robur), in relation to two alternative hypotheses: (1) females select their resources with respect to their future quality for developing larvae; or (2) temporal changes in resource quality prevent females from selecting the best larval resources. 3. Specifically, we test whether females show the strongest selection at the levels at which quality varies the most (shoots and leaves); whether they respond to specific leaf attributes (leaf size, phenolic content and conspecific eggs); and whether female preference is reflected in offspring performance. 4. Female choice of leaves was found to be non-random. Within trees, the females preferred certain shoots, but when the shoots were on different trees the degree of discrimination was about four times larger than when they were on the same trees. 5. While females typically lay more eggs on large leaves, this is not a result of active selection of large leaves, but rather a result of females moving at random and ovipositing at regular intervals. 6. The females in our study did not adjust their oviposition behaviour in response to leaf phenolic contents (as measured by the time of larval feeding). Neither did they avoid leaves with conspecific eggs. 7. Female choice of oviposition sites did not match patterns of offspring performance: there was no positive association between offspring survival and counts of eggs. 8. We propose that temporal variation in resource quality may prevent female moths from evaluating resource quality reliably. To compensate for this, females may adopt a risk-spreading strategy when selecting their resources.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2656.2007.01261.xDOI Listing
September 2007