Publications by authors named "Ellie Russell"

3 Publications

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Lifetime and 12-month prevalence of eating disorders amongst women in mid-life: a population-based study of diagnoses and risk factors.

BMC Med 2017 Jan 17;15(1):12. Epub 2017 Jan 17.

Eating Disorders Research Unit, Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK.

Background: Eating disorders (EDs) are common amongst women; however, no research has specifically investigated the lifetime/12-month prevalence of eating disorders amongst women in mid-life (i.e., fourth and fifth decade of life) and the relevant longitudinal risk factors. We aimed to investigate the lifetime and 12-month prevalence of EDs and lifetime health service use and to identify childhood, parenting, and personality risk factors.

Methods: This is a two-phase prevalence study, nested within an existing longitudinal community-based sample of women in mid-life. A total of 5658 women from the UK Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC; enrolled 20 years earlier) participated. ED diagnoses were obtained using validated structured interviews. Weighted analyses were carried out accounting for the two-phase methodology to obtain prevalence figures and to carry out risk factor regression analyses.

Results: By mid-life, 15.3% (95% confidence intervals, 13.5-17.4%) of women had met criteria for a lifetime ED. The 12-month prevalence of EDs was 3.6%. Childhood sexual abuse was prospectively associated with all binge/purge type disorders and an external locus of control was associated with binge-eating disorder. Better maternal care was protective for bulimia nervosa. Childhood life events and interpersonal sensitivity were associated with all EDs.

Conclusions: By mid-life a significant proportion of women will experience an ED, and few women accessed healthcare. Active EDs are common in mid-life, both due to new onset and chronic disorders. Increased awareness of the full spectrum of EDs in this stage of life and adequate service provision is important. This is the first study to investigate childhood and personality risk factors for full threshold and sub-threshold EDs and to identify common predictors for full and sub-threshold EDs. Further research should clarify the role of preventable risk factors on both full and sub-threshold EDs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-016-0766-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5240354PMC
January 2017

Variation at the GABAA receptor gene, Rho 1 (GABRR1) associated with susceptibility to bipolar schizoaffective disorder.

Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet 2010 Oct;153B(7):1347-9

Department of Psychological Medicine and Neurology, MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff, United Kingdom.

We have previously reported evidence that variation at GABA(A) receptor genes is associated with susceptibility to bipolar disorder with schizophrenia-like psychotic features (Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type) with gene-wide significance at GABRB1, GABRA4, GABRB3, GABRA5, and GABRR3. Here we provide suggestive evidence implicating a sixth member of the gene family, GABRR1 (gene-wide P = 0.0058; experiment-wide corrected significance P = 0.052).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.b.31108DOI Listing
October 2010

Genome-wide association study of CNVs in 16,000 cases of eight common diseases and 3,000 shared controls.

Nature 2010 Apr;464(7289):713-20

Copy number variants (CNVs) account for a major proportion of human genetic polymorphism and have been predicted to have an important role in genetic susceptibility to common disease. To address this we undertook a large, direct genome-wide study of association between CNVs and eight common human diseases. Using a purpose-designed array we typed approximately 19,000 individuals into distinct copy-number classes at 3,432 polymorphic CNVs, including an estimated approximately 50% of all common CNVs larger than 500 base pairs. We identified several biological artefacts that lead to false-positive associations, including systematic CNV differences between DNAs derived from blood and cell lines. Association testing and follow-up replication analyses confirmed three loci where CNVs were associated with disease-IRGM for Crohn's disease, HLA for Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes, and TSPAN8 for type 2 diabetes-although in each case the locus had previously been identified in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based studies, reflecting our observation that most common CNVs that are well-typed on our array are well tagged by SNPs and so have been indirectly explored through SNP studies. We conclude that common CNVs that can be typed on existing platforms are unlikely to contribute greatly to the genetic basis of common human diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature08979DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2892339PMC
April 2010