Publications by authors named "Ellen Roelfsema"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Overfeeding Extends the Period of Annual Cyclicity but Increases the Risk of Early Embryonic Death in Shetland Pony Mares.

Animals (Basel) 2021 Feb 1;11(2). Epub 2021 Feb 1.

Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 112, 3584 CM Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Obesity has been associated with altered reproductive activity in mares, and may negatively affect fertility. To examine the influence of long-term high-energy (HE) feeding on fertility, Shetland pony mares were fed a diet containing 200% of net energy (NE) requirements during a three-year study. The incidence of hemorrhagic anovulatory follicles (HAF) and annual duration of cyclicity were compared to those in control mares receiving a maintenance diet. Day-7 embryos were flushed and transferred between donor and recipient mares from both groups; the resulting conceptuses were collected 21 days after transfer to assess conceptus development. HE mares became obese, and embryos recovered from HE mares were more likely to succumb to early embryonic death. The period of annual cyclicity was extended in HE compared to control mares in all years. The incidence of HAFs did not consistently differ between HE and control mares. No differences in embryo morphometric parameters were apparent. In conclusion, consuming a HE diet extended the duration of cyclicity, and appeared to increase the likelihood of embryos undergoing early embryonic death following embryo transfer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ani11020361DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7912773PMC
February 2021

Effect of long-term overfeeding of a high-energy diet on glucose tolerance in Shetland pony mares.

J Vet Intern Med 2020 May 6;34(3):1339-1349. Epub 2020 May 6.

Department of Equine Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: Overfeeding is associated with obesity and insulin dysregulation (ID), which are both risk factors for equine metabolic syndrome. How chronic overfeeding affects development of these factors is poorly understood.

Objectives: To examine the influence of long-term high-energy diet provision on body condition and ID.

Animals: Eleven Shetland pony mares.

Methods: In a 3-phase study, the high-energy group (n = 7) was fed 200% of net energy (NE) requirements (hay; concentrate: 36% sugar and starch, 13% fat) for 24 weeks, followed by 17 weeks hay-only feeding before resuming the high-energy diet (n = 4) for an additional 29 weeks. Mares were weighed weekly. Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed 3 to 4 times per dietary period. Results were compared with those of a control group (phase 1, n = 4; phases 2 and 3, n = 6) that received 100% NE requirements, using a general linear mixed model with post hoc Bonferroni testing.

Results: The mean body weight of the high-energy group increased by 27% per high-energy feeding period. During both feeding periods, area under the curve (AUC) for plasma glucose concentration decreased (P < .01), whereas AUC for plasma insulin concentration increased. Mean basal plasma glucose concentration and peak plasma insulin concentrations were higher (P < .05) in the high-energy group than in the control group.

Conclusion And Clinical Importance: Feeding a high-energy diet to healthy nonobese Shetland pony mares led to more efficient glucose metabolism within 5 weeks, followed by significant hyperinsulinemia and obesity. Hyperinsulinemic status was reversed during 17 weeks of hay-only feeding, regardless of body condition, but returned rapidly after restarting the high-energy diet.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jvim.15788DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7255650PMC
May 2020

Response to letter to editor regarding ECEIM consensus statement on equine metabolic syndrome.

J Vet Intern Med 2019 05 16;33(3):1125-1126. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Equine Clinic, Internal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jvim.15503DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6524088PMC
May 2019

ECEIM consensus statement on equine metabolic syndrome.

J Vet Intern Med 2019 Mar 6;33(2):335-349. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Equine Clinic, Internal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany.

Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) is a widely recognized collection of risk factors for endocrinopathic laminitis. The most important of these risk factors is insulin dysregulation (ID). Clinicians and horse owners must recognize the presence of these risk factors so that they can be targeted and controlled to reduce the risk of laminitis attacks. Diagnosis of EMS is based partly on the horse's history and clinical examination findings, and partly on laboratory testing. Several choices of test exist which examine different facets of ID and other related metabolic disturbances. EMS is controlled mainly by dietary strategies and exercise programs that aim to improve insulin regulation and decrease obesity where present. In some cases, pharmacologic aids might be useful. Management of an EMS case is a long-term strategy requiring diligence and discipline by the horse's carer and support and guidance from their veterinarians.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jvim.15423DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6430910PMC
March 2019