Publications by authors named "Elizabeth Pullen"

2 Publications

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Effects of Mouthpiece Noninvasive Ventilation on Speech in Men With Muscular Dystrophy: A Pilot Study.

Am J Speech Lang Pathol 2021 Mar 2:1-9. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle.

Purpose The use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is on the rise as an alternative to tracheostomy for individuals with neuromuscular disorders with life-prolonging and quality-of-life benefits. This pilot study was designed to determine if mouthpiece NIV (M-NIV) alters speech in individuals with muscular dystrophy (MD). Method Eight men (23-44 years), seven with Duchenne MD and one with Becker MD, who used daytime M-NIV, were asked to sustain phonation, count, and read under three conditions: (a) (no instructions), (b) (cued to use M-NIV with all speaking breaths), and (c) (as tolerated). Breath group and inspiratory durations, syllables/breath group, and relative sound pressure level were determined from audio and video recordings. Results Uncued condition: Participants used the ventilator for all inspirations that preceded sustained phonation and counting. During reading, four participants used M-NIV for all inspirations, one never used it, and three used it for some (19%-41%) inspirations. With- versus Without-M-NIV conditions: Breath group duration was significantly longer across all tasks, syllables per breath group were significantly greater during reading, and inspiratory pause duration during reading was significantly longer with M-NIV than without. Sound pressure level was significantly higher during the first second of sustained phonation with M-NIV (though not for counting and reading). Two participants were unable to complete the reading task audibly without using their M-NIV. Conclusions Speech may be better with M-NIV than without because it is possible to produce longer breath groups and some people with severe respiratory muscle weakness may not be able to speak at all without ventilator-supplied air. Nevertheless, the longer inspiratory pauses that accompany M-NIV may interrupt the flow of speech. Future research is needed to determine the most effective way to use M-NIV for speaking and whether training participants in its use can bring even greater speech benefits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2020_AJSLP-20-00146DOI Listing
March 2021

Experiences of Speaking With Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation: A Qualitative Investigation.

Am J Speech Lang Pathol 2019 07 15;28(2S):784-792. Epub 2019 Jul 15.

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle.

Purpose The aim of this study was to describe experiences of speaking with 2 forms of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV)-mouthpiece NPPV (M-NPPV) and nasal bilevel positive airway pressure (BPAP)-in people with neuromuscular disorders who depend on NPPV for survival. Method Twelve participants (ages 22-68 years; 10 men, 2 women) with neuromuscular disorders (9 Duchenne muscular dystrophy, 1 Becker muscular dystrophy, 1 postpolio syndrome, and 1 spinal cord injury) took part in semistructured interviews about their speech. All subjects used M-NPPV during the day, and all but 1 used BPAP at night for their ventilation needs. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and verified. A qualitative descriptive phenomenological approach was used to code and develop themes. Results Three major themes emerged from the interview data: (a) M-NPPV aids speaking (by increasing loudness, utterance duration, clarity, and speaking endurance), (b) M-NPPV interferes with the flow of speaking (due to the need to pause to take a breath, problems with mouthpiece placement, and difficulty in using speech recognition software), and (c) nasal BPAP interferes with speaking (by causing abnormal nasal resonance, muffled speech, mask discomfort, and difficulty in coordinating speaking with ventilator-delivered inspirations). Conclusion These qualitative data from chronic NPPV users suggest that both M-NPPV and nasal BPAP may interfere with speaking but that speech is usually better and speaking is usually easier with M-NPPV. These findings can be explained primarily by the nature of the 2 ventilator delivery systems and their interfaces.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2019_AJSLP-MSC18-18-0101DOI Listing
July 2019