Publications by authors named "Elizabeth Parks Aronson"

3 Publications

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Features, Functionality, and Acceptability of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Tinnitus in the United States.

Am J Audiol 2020 Sep 28;29(3):476-490. Epub 2020 Jul 28.

Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX.

Objective Although tinnitus is one of the most commonly reported symptoms in the general population, patients with bothersome tinnitus are challenged by issues related to accessibility of care and intervention options that lack strong evidence to support their use. Therefore, creative ways of delivering evidence-based interventions are necessary. Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) demonstrates potential as a means of delivering this support but is not currently available in the United States. This article discusses the adaptation of an ICBT intervention, originally used in Sweden, Germany, and the United Kingdom, for delivery in the United States. The aim of this study was to (a) modify the web platform's features to suit a U.S. population, (b) adapt its functionality to comply with regulatory aspects, and (c) evaluate the credibility and acceptability of the ICBT intervention from the perspective of health care professionals and patients with bothersome tinnitus. Materials/Method Initially, the iTerapi ePlatform developed in Sweden was adopted for use in the United States. Functional adaptations followed to ensure that the platform's functional and security features complied with both institutional and governmental regulations and that it was suitable for a U.S. population. Following these adaptations, credibility and acceptance of the materials were evaluated by both health care professionals ( = 11) and patients with bothersome tinnitus ( = 8). Results Software safety and compliance regulatory assessments were met. Health care professionals and patients reported favorable acceptance and satisfaction ratings regarding the content, suitability, presentation, usability, and exercises provided in the ICBT platform. Modifications to the features and functionality of the platform were made according to user feedback. Conclusions Ensuring that the ePlatform employed the appropriate features and functionalities for the intended population was essential to developing the Internet-based interventions. The favorable user evaluations indicated that the intervention materials were appropriate for the tinnitus population in the United States.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2020_AJA-20-00002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7842846PMC
September 2020

Readability Following Cultural and Linguistic Adaptations of an Internet-Based Intervention for Tinnitus for Use in the United States.

Am J Audiol 2020 Jun 26;29(2):97-109. Epub 2020 Feb 26.

Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX.

Purpose An Internet-based tinnitus intervention for use in the United States could improve the provision of tinnitus-related services. Although clinical trials of such interventions were completed in Europe, the United Kingdom, and Australia, their suitability for adults with tinnitus in the United States is yet to be established. The aim of this study was to improve the cultural and linguistic suitability, and lower the readability level, of an existing program for tinnitus to ensure its suitability for U.S. English- and Spanish-speaking populations. Method Guidelines for adaptation were followed and involved four phases: (a) cultural adaptations, as interventions targeted at specific cultures have been shown to improve outcomes; (b) creating Spanish materials to improve access of the materials to the large Spanish-speaking population in the United States; (c) professional review of the materials for acceptability as an intervention tool for a U.S. population; and (d) literacy-level adjustments to make the content accessible to those with lower levels of health literacy skills. Results Cultural adaptations were made by using word substitutions, changing examples, and modifying the spelling of certain words. The materials were then translated into Spanish and cross-checked. Professional review ensured suitability of the chapters. Literacy-level adjustments ensured all chapters were within the guidelines for readability grade levels below the sixth-grade level. Conclusions The previously developed tinnitus materials were revised to adhere to best practice guidelines and ensure cultural suitability for adults with tinnitus in the United States. As it is also available in Spanish, members of the large Hispanic community also have access to the intervention in their first language. Further studies should determine whether these changes improve patients' self-efficacy, engagement, and motivation to complete the intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2019_AJA-19-00014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7839022PMC
June 2020

Translation and adaptation of three English tinnitus patient-reported outcome measures to Spanish.

Int J Audiol 2020 07 29;59(7):513-518. Epub 2020 Jan 29.

Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA.

The objective of this study was to improve the range of standardised tinnitus Spanish Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMS) available by translating and ensuring cross-cultural adaptation of three English PROMs to Spanish. The Tinnitus and Hearing Survey, Tinnitus Cognition Questionnaire, and Tinnitus Qualities Questionnaire were translated to Spanish using recently established good practice guidelines. The translation process addressed 22 items included in six main steps specified in the guidelines. The translated PROMs were field tested on a sample of tinnitus patients who were recruited through convenience sampling using cognitive debriefing ( = 5) and pilot testing ( = 10) methods. The translation process employed the required steps and provided specific details about the process and procedures. In addition, practical issues encountered while translating and adapting the questionnaires that may influence future translations were revealed. This is the first account of translating and adapting PROMs from one language to another using the good practice guidelines specific to hearing-related questionnaires. Following the rigorous procedures should ensure that the translated PROMs have linguistic and cultural equivalence to the original versions, although psychometric evaluation would remain necessary to confirm the functional equivalence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14992027.2020.1717006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7385997PMC
July 2020
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