Publications by authors named "Elizabeth M Waldron"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Mental Health in Women Living With HIV: The Unique and Unmet Needs.

J Int Assoc Provid AIDS Care 2021 Jan-Dec;20:2325958220985665

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, 12244Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.

Women living with HIV (WLWH) experience depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress symptoms at higher rates than their male counterparts and more often than HIV-unaffected women. These mental health issues affect not only the well-being and quality of life of WLWH, but have implications for HIV management and transmission prevention. Despite these ramifications, WLWH are under-treated for mental health concerns and they are underrepresented in the mental health treatment literature. In this review, we illustrate the unique mental health issues faced by WLWH such as a high prevalence of physical and sexual abuse histories, caregiving stress, and elevated internalized stigma as well as myriad barriers to care. We examine the feasibility and outcomes of mental health interventions that have been tested in WLWH including cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based interventions, and supportive counseling. Future research is required to address individual and systemic barriers to mental health care for WLWH.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2325958220985665DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7829520PMC
January 2021

Targeting fear of positive evaluation in patients with social anxiety disorder via a brief cognitive behavioural therapy protocol: a proof-of-principle study.

Behav Cogn Psychother 2020 Nov 3;48(6):745-750. Epub 2020 Aug 3.

Adult Anxiety Clinic of Temple, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Background: Our aim was to develop a brief cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) protocol to augment treatment for social anxiety disorder (SAD). This protocol focused specifically upon fear of positive evaluation (FPE). To our knowledge, this is the first protocol that has been designed to systematically target FPE.

Aims: To test the feasibility of a brief (two-session) CBT protocol for FPE and report proof-of-principle data in the form of effect sizes.

Method: Seven patients with a principal diagnosis of SAD were recruited to participate. Following a pre-treatment assessment, patients were randomized to either (a) an immediate CBT condition (n = 3), or (b) a comparable wait-list (WL) period (2 weeks; n = 4). Two WL patients also completed the CBT protocol following the WL period (delayed CBT condition). Patients completed follow-up assessments 1 week after completing the protocol.

Results: A total of five patients completed the brief, FPE-specific CBT protocol (two of the seven patients were wait-listed only and did not complete delayed CBT). All five patients completed the protocol and provided 1-week follow-up data. CBT patients demonstrated large reductions in FPE-related concerns as well as overall social anxiety symptoms, whereas WL patients demonstrated an increase in FPE-related concerns.

Conclusions: Our brief FPE-specific CBT protocol is feasible to use and was associated with large FPE-specific and social anxiety symptom reductions. To our knowledge, this is the first treatment report that has focused on systematic treatment of FPE in patients with SAD. Our protocol warrants further controlled evaluation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1352465820000491DOI Listing
November 2020

The long-term effect of trauma history on adolescent depression treatment.

Psychol Trauma 2019 Oct 8;11(7):751-759. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

Background: Childhood trauma is associated with the development of depression during adolescence. Prior research suggests that traumatic experiences may result in differential acute treatment outcomes for depressed adolescents. However, the long-term effects of trauma on treatment response remain unclear.

Method: Participants (N = 318) with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups: cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), fluoxetine (FLX), or their combination (COMB). All participants received 36 weeks of active treatment followed by 1 year of open follow-up. We hypothesized that (a) adolescents without a trauma history would have greater symptom reduction over the course of treatment compared to those with a trauma history and (b) there would be an interaction between trauma history, treatment arm, and time such that adolescents without trauma histories in combination treatment would improve the most rapidly. Linear mixed effects modeling, factorial ANOVAs, and log-linear analyses were used to test these hypotheses.

Results: The linear mixed effect model revealed a significant 3-way interaction of time, trauma, and treatment type. In the CBT and COMB groups, adolescents without trauma histories improved more rapidly than traumatized adolescents. In the single-time-point analyses, there were no significant differences between adolescents with trauma histories and those without trauma histories.

Conclusions: Whereas all treatment groups experienced significant reductions in depression regardless of trauma history, adolescents without trauma histories receiving psychotherapy demonstrated more rapid improvements in depression symptom severity. Treatment response did not differ between traumatized and nontraumatized youth at long-term follow-up. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/tra0000457DOI Listing
October 2019

A Mindfulness-Based Intervention for Low-Income African American Women with Depressive Symptoms Delivered by an Experienced Instructor Versus a Novice Instructor.

J Altern Complement Med 2019 Jul 26;25(7):699-708. Epub 2019 Mar 26.

2Department of Medical Social Sciences, and Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

In the present study, the authors pilot a streamlined mindfulness teacher training protocol for Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) staff and examine the distribution and variability of psychologic outcomes for participants in groups led by an experienced instructor compared to a FQHC staff instructor who received the streamlined training. Seventy-four adult women aged 18-65 with depressive symptoms enrolled to participate in the 8-week group mindfulness intervention led by an experienced instructor ( = 33) or a novice instructor ( = 41). The effect of instructor on the outcomes depression, stress, mindfulness, functioning, well-being, and depression stigma was assessed at baseline, 8, and 16 weeks. Depressive symptoms and stress significantly decreased, and mindfulness significantly increased in the experienced and novice instructor groups. In the novice instructor group, there was also a significant increase in well-being and functioning. The change in depressive symptoms, stress, functioning, and well-being was significantly greater in the novice instructor group than the experienced instructor groups. Preliminary data suggest that health care staff who receive streamlined training to deliver mindfulness-based interventions have comparable outcomes as experienced instructors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/acm.2018.0393DOI Listing
July 2019

Accessibility and feasibility of using technology to support mindfulness practice, reduce stress and promote long term mental health.

Complement Ther Clin Pract 2018 Nov 8;33:93-99. Epub 2018 Sep 8.

Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, 680 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 1400, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA.

Background And Purpose: We evaluated the feasibility of using an activity monitor to support mindfulness practice, reduce self-reported stress and physiological indicators of stress.

Materials And Methods: Adult women (N = 19) who previously participated in a mindfulness intervention wore an activity monitor for eight-weeks. The activity monitor notified them when they were stressed (based on standard deviation pulse pressure). Heart rate and pulse pressure were continuously collected via the activity monitor. Mindfulness, stress, depression and trauma symptoms were collected via self-report surveys.

Results: There were no significant changes in self-reported stress, depression, post-traumatic stress and mindfulness from baseline to eight-weeks. Pulse pressure and standard deviation of pulse pressure increased over time. Those who were high on the non-judge mindfulness subscale had a lower standard deviation pulse pressure and spent less time stressed.

Conclusion: Those who are more mindful are less likely to have physiological signs of stress.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2018.09.001DOI Listing
November 2018

Impact of a novel interprofessional dental and pharmacy student tobacco cessation education programme on dental patient outcomes.

J Interprof Care 2018 Jan 23;32(1):52-62. Epub 2017 Oct 23.

c Department of Pharmacy Practice , Temple University School of Pharmacy , Philadelphia , PA , USA.

The dental setting presents a unique opportunity to assist patients with tobacco cessation. Many dental providers do not feel prepared to provide tobacco cessation, particularly with regard to education on pharmacological treatments. An interprofessional practice experience with dental and pharmacy students provides a novel approach to tobacco cessation in the dental setting, but it is not known whether such methods affect patient outcomes. The goal of the study was to examine the impact of a novel dental and pharmacy student tobacco cessation education programme on patient knowledge gained, barriers to utilising cessation medications, quit intentions, and quit behaviours as compared to standard care. Dental patients who were seen at the dental admissions clinic of a dental school on interprofessional care (IPC) days and received tobacco cessation education from the dental-pharmacy student team (N = 25) were compared with dental patients at the clinic seen on Standard Care (SC) days (N = 25). Patients completed a post-appointment survey and a 4-week follow-up survey. IPC patients reported greater perceived knowledge post-appointment and at follow-up regarding tobacco cessation compared with SC patients and had greater intentions to utilise medication to assist with tobacco cessation. At follow-up there were no differences between groups in terms of quit attempts. Among patients who made a quit attempt those in the IPC group were more likely to have set a quit date and contacted a provider for assistance regarding tobacco cessation. Dental-pharmacy student interprofessional tobacco cessation may be an innovative way to provide tobacco cessation education to dental patients and provide students with interprofessional practice experiences.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13561820.2017.1378171DOI Listing
January 2018

Dental Students' Attitudes Toward Tobacco Cessation in the Dental Setting: A Systematic Review.

J Dent Educ 2017 May;81(5):500-516

Dr. Myers Virtue is Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Community Oral Health Sciences, Maurice H. Kornberg School of Dentistry, Temple University; Ms. Waldron is Research Assistant, Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Community Oral Health Sciences, Maurice H. Kornberg School of Dentistry, Temple University; Ms. Darabos is a doctoral student, Department of Psychology, City University of New York; Ms. DeAngelis is a doctoral student, Department of Psychology, LaSalle University; Dr. Moore is a postdoctoral fellow, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Cooper University Hospital; Dr. Fornatora is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Maurice H. Kornberg School of Dentistry, Temple University; and Dr. Tellez is Associate Professor, Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Community Oral Health Sciences, Maurice H. Kornberg School of Dentistry, Temple University.

Many dental schools have integrated tobacco cessation into their predoctoral curricula. However, dental students' perceptions should be taken into consideration when designing those curricula. The aim of this study was to systematically review the published literature on dental students' attitudes and perceptions regarding tobacco cessation. The research team conducted a search for articles through April 2016 using the following electronic databases: Medline, PsychInfo, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL. Each abstract and/or article was reviewed for inclusion. Data were extracted from all included articles. Each was rated for quality appraisal by two reviewers. The initial search identified 2,035 articles, and 38 of those were included in the review. The majority were cross-sectional and sampled students from one dental school. There was wide variation in the measurement of dental student attitudes. Overall, the majority of students in these studies reported believing it is within the scope of dental practice to address tobacco use with patients, but there was variability in terms of the practice of specific tobacco cessation strategies. The most common perceived barrier was patient resistance/lack of motivation. In most of the studies, the majority of students were interested in being trained in tobacco cessation. The findings suggest that dental students will respond positively to receiving tobacco cessation education while in dental school and that educators should include strategies to help future dentists deal with patient resistance. Future studies should focus on the development of a validated measure of dental student attitudes toward tobacco cessation and longitudinal, multi-institutional research that can provide more generalizable findings.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.21815/JDE.016.016DOI Listing
May 2017