Publications by authors named "Elizabeth M Starr"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Teaching Initiated Question Asking to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Through a Short-Term Parent-Mediated Program.

J Autism Dev Disord 2020 Oct;50(10):3728-3738

Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development, Stanford University, 410 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.

This study investigated whether a brief parent-mediated intervention would increase the frequency of question asking in children with ASD. Mothers participated in a 3-week training consisting of 2-h sessions twice weekly. Data were collected in the context of concurrent multiple baseline design. Results demonstrate all three children increased frequency of question asking with two children maintaining gains. All three children demonstrated generalization of question asking to novel items, family members, and/or settings. Affect improved for two of the three children. Overall, mothers were able to reach Fidelity of Implementation during most sessions and rated the intervention as highly acceptable. Results are discussed in regard to the feasibility of providing a short-term parent-implemented intervention to increase social initiations through question asking.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-020-04426-2DOI Listing
October 2020

Brief report: autism in individuals with Down syndrome.

J Autism Dev Disord 2005 Oct;35(5):665-73

MRC Child Psychiatry Unit, University of London, UK.

As an off-shoot of a study examining the reliability and validity of an adapted version of the Pre-Linguistic Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (A-PL-ADOS), 13 individuals with Down syndrome with IQs ranging between 24 and 48 were administered the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and the A-PL-ADOS, which are well-validated interview and observational diagnostic measures. Three out of 13 met lifetime criteria on the ADI-R, but none of these three showed behavior that met the criterion for autism on the A-PL-ADOS (although two nearly did so). However, two individuals did meet the A-PL-ADOS criterion and showed behavior that fell only just short of meeting lifetime criteria on the ADI-R. Altogether, 5 individuals with Down syndrome may be considered to show an autism spectrum disorder. Of the remaining 8, some showed a few autistic features, and some showed none. The findings raise both methodological and conceptual issues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-005-0010-0DOI Listing
October 2005