Publications by authors named "Elizabeth L Shane"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Postvaccination SARS-CoV-2 Infections Among Skilled Nursing Facility Residents and Staff Members - Chicago, Illinois, December 2020-March 2021.

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2021 Apr 30;70(17):632-638. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

Early studies suggest that COVID-19 vaccines protect against severe illness (1); however, postvaccination SARS-CoV-2 infections (i.e., breakthrough infections) can occur because COVID-19 vaccines do not offer 100% protection (2,3). Data evaluating the occurrence of breakthrough infections and impact of vaccination in decreasing transmission in congregate settings are limited. Skilled nursing facility (SNF) residents and staff members have been disproportionately affected by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 (4,5), and were prioritized for COVID-19 vaccination (6,7). Starting December 28, 2020, all 78 Chicago-based SNFs began COVID-19 vaccination clinics over several weeks through the federal Pharmacy Partnership for Long-Term Care Program (PPP). In February 2021, through routine screening, the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) identified a SARS-CoV-2 infection in a SNF resident >14 days after receipt of the second dose of a two-dose COVID-19 vaccination series. SARS-CoV-2 cases, vaccination status, and possible vaccine breakthrough infections were identified by matching facility reports with state case and vaccination registries. Among 627 persons with SARS-CoV-2 infection across 75 SNFs since vaccination clinics began, 22 SARS-CoV-2 infections were identified among 12 residents and 10 staff members across 15 facilities ≥14 days after receiving their second vaccine dose (i.e., breakthrough infections in fully vaccinated persons). Nearly two thirds (14 of 22; 64%) of persons with breakthrough infections were asymptomatic; two residents were hospitalized because of COVID-19, and one died. No facility-associated secondary transmission occurred. Although few SARS-CoV-2 infections in fully vaccinated persons were observed, these cases demonstrate the need for SNFs to follow recommended routine infection prevention and control practices and promote high vaccination coverage among SNF residents and staff members.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm7017e1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8084122PMC
April 2021

Time motion study in a pediatric emergency department before and after computer physician order entry.

Ann Emerg Med 2009 Apr 20;53(4):462-468.e1. Epub 2008 Nov 20.

Department of Pediatrics, Section of Emergency Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA.

Study Objective: To determine the effect of computer physician order entry on pediatric emergency department (ED) care providers allocation of time. We seek to determine whether the increase in time by ED care providers on the computer will decrease time spent with patients.

Methods: This was a before-and-after observational time-and-motion study conducted at an urban pediatric ED. Observers recorded how caregivers allocated their time during 180-minute observation periods at 30-second increments the summers before after computer physician order entry introduction. Time on the computer was recorded in seconds. Observations were placed into 3 categories (direct patient care, indirect patient care, other), each with its own subcategories.

Results: For attending physicians, median computer time increased from 5.0 minutes before computer physician order entry to 9.5 minutes after computer physician order entry (P=.01). For resident physicians, median computer time increased from 5.5 minutes before computer physician order entry to 14.3 minutes after computer physician order entry (P=.001). For nurses, time on the computer was not significantly different before and after computer physician order entry (P=.15), although it appears there was still some change in time allocation. After computer physician order entry, nurses' talking with staff about patient care decreased from 24.5 minutes to 13.3 minutes (P=.01). Computer physician order entry did not decrease time with patients for any of the caregiver types.

Conclusion: The addition of computer physician order entry to a pediatric ED increases time spent on the computer by both attending and resident physicians but not for emergency nurses. This additional time on the computer is allocated from nonpatient care activities. The addition of computer physician order entry decreases nurses' time talking with other staff for patient care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annemergmed.2008.09.018DOI Listing
April 2009
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