Publications by authors named "Elizabeth E L Buimer"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Sex Differences in Lifespan Trajectories and Variability of Human Sulcal and Gyral Morphology.

Cereb Cortex 2021 Oct;31(11):5107-5120

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Calle Ibiza, 43, 28009, Madrid, Spain.

Sex differences in the development and aging of human sulcal morphology have been understudied. We charted sex differences in trajectories and inter-individual variability of global sulcal depth, width, and length, pial surface area, exposed (hull) gyral surface area, unexposed sulcal surface area, cortical thickness, gyral span, and cortex volume across the lifespan in a longitudinal sample (700 scans, 194 participants 2 scans, 104 three scans, age range: 16-70 years) of neurotypical males and females. After adjusting for brain volume, females had thicker cortex and steeper thickness decline until age 40 years; trajectories converged thereafter. Across sexes, sulcal shortening was faster before age 40, while sulcal shallowing and widening were faster thereafter. Although hull area remained stable, sulcal surface area declined and was more strongly associated with sulcal shortening than with sulcal shallowing and widening. Males showed greater variability for cortex volume and lower variability for sulcal width. Our findings highlight the association between loss of sulcal area, notably through sulcal shortening, with cortex volume loss. Studying sex differences in lifespan trajectories may improve knowledge of individual differences in brain development and the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhab145DOI Listing
October 2021

De-identification procedures for magnetic resonance images and the impact on structural brain measures at different ages.

Hum Brain Mapp 2021 Aug 11;42(11):3643-3655. Epub 2021 May 11.

UMC Utrecht Brain Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.

Surface rendering of MRI brain scans may lead to identification of the participant through facial characteristics. In this study, we evaluate three methods that overwrite voxels containing privacy-sensitive information: Face Masking, FreeSurfer defacing, and FSL defacing. We included structural T1-weighted MRI scans of children, young adults and older adults. For the young adults, test-retest data were included with a 1-week interval. The effects of the de-identification methods were quantified using different statistics to capture random variation and systematic noise in measures obtained through the FreeSurfer processing pipeline. Face Masking and FSL defacing impacted brain voxels in some scans especially in younger participants. FreeSurfer defacing left brain tissue intact in all cases. FSL defacing and FreeSurfer defacing preserved identifiable characteristics around the eyes or mouth in some scans. For all de-identification methods regional brain measures of subcortical volume, cortical volume, cortical surface area, and cortical thickness were on average highly replicable when derived from original versus de-identified scans with average regional correlations >.90 for children, young adults, and older adults. Small systematic biases were found that incidentally resulted in significantly different brain measures after de-identification, depending on the studied subsample, de-identification method, and brain metric. In young adults, test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were comparable for original scans and de-identified scans with average regional ICCs >.90 for (sub)cortical volume and cortical surface area and ICCs >.80 for cortical thickness. We conclude that apparent visual differences between de-identification methods minimally impact reliability of brain measures, although small systematic biases can occur.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.25459DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8249889PMC
August 2021

The YOUth study: Rationale, design, and study procedures.

Dev Cogn Neurosci 2020 12 7;46:100868. Epub 2020 Oct 7.

UMC Utrecht Brain Center, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands; Experimental Psychology, Helmholtz Institute, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands; Developmental Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Behavioral development in children shows large inter-individual variation, and is driven by the interplay between biological, psychological, and environmental processes. However, there is still little insight into how these processes interact. The YOUth cohort specifically focuses on two core characteristics of behavioral development: social competence and self-regulation. Social competence refers to the ability to engage in meaningful interactions with others, whereas self-regulation is the ability to control one's emotions, behavior, and impulses, to balance between reactivity and control of the reaction, and to adjust to the prevailing environment. YOUth is an accelerated population-based longitudinal cohort study with repeated measurements, centering on two groups: YOUth Baby & Child and YOUth Child & Adolescent. YOUth Baby & Child aims to include 3,000 pregnant women, their partners and children, wheras YOUth Child & Adolescent aims to include 2,000 children aged between 8 and 10 years old and their parents. All participants will be followed for at least 6 years, and potentially longer. In this paper we describe in detail the design of this study, the population included, the determinants, intermediate neurocognitive measures and outcomes included in the study. Furthermore, we describe in detail the procedures of inclusion, informed consent, and study participation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2020.100868DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7575850PMC
December 2020

The YOUth cohort study: MRI protocol and test-retest reliability in adults.

Dev Cogn Neurosci 2020 10 8;45:100816. Epub 2020 Jul 8.

UMCU Brain Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, University Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

The YOUth cohort study is a unique longitudinal study on brain development in the general population. As part of the YOUth study, 2000 children will be included at 8, 9 or 10 years of age and planned to return every three years during adolescence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scans are collected, including structural T1-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), resting-state functional MRI and task-based functional MRI. Here, we provide a comprehensive report of the MR acquisition in YOUth Child & Adolescent including the test-retest reliability of brain measures derived from each type of scan. To measure test-retest reliability, 17 adults were scanned twice with a week between sessions using the full YOUth MRI protocol. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify reliability. Global brain measures derived from structural T1-weighted and DWI scans were reliable. Resting-state functional connectivity was moderately reliable, as well as functional brain measures for both the inhibition task (stop versus go) and the emotion task (face versus house). Our results complement previous studies by presenting reliability results of regional brain measures collected with different MRI modalities. YOUth facilitates data sharing and aims for reliable and high-quality data. Here we show that using the state-of-the art YOUth MRI protocol brain measures can be estimated reliably.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2020.100816DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7365929PMC
October 2020

Intelligence, educational attainment, and brain structure in those at familial high-risk for schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

Hum Brain Mapp 2020 Oct 7. Epub 2020 Oct 7.

Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, Australia.

First-degree relatives of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (SZ-FDRs) show similar patterns of brain abnormalities and cognitive alterations to patients, albeit with smaller effect sizes. First-degree relatives of patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder (BD-FDRs) show divergent patterns; on average, intracranial volume is larger compared to controls, and findings on cognitive alterations in BD-FDRs are inconsistent. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of global and regional brain measures (cortical and subcortical), current IQ, and educational attainment in 5,795 individuals (1,103 SZ-FDRs, 867 BD-FDRs, 2,190 controls, 942 schizophrenia patients, 693 bipolar patients) from 36 schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorder family cohorts, with standardized methods. Compared to controls, SZ-FDRs showed a pattern of widespread thinner cortex, while BD-FDRs had widespread larger cortical surface area. IQ was lower in SZ-FDRs (d = -0.42, p = 3 × 10 ), with weak evidence of IQ reductions among BD-FDRs (d = -0.23, p = .045). Both relative groups had similar educational attainment compared to controls. When adjusting for IQ or educational attainment, the group-effects on brain measures changed, albeit modestly. Changes were in the expected direction, with less pronounced brain abnormalities in SZ-FDRs and more pronounced effects in BD-FDRs. To conclude, SZ-FDRs and BD-FDRs show a differential pattern of structural brain abnormalities. In contrast, both had lower IQ scores and similar school achievements compared to controls. Given that brain differences between SZ-FDRs and BD-FDRs remain after adjusting for IQ or educational attainment, we suggest that differential brain developmental processes underlying predisposition for schizophrenia or bipolar disorder are likely independent of general cognitive impairment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.25206DOI Listing
October 2020

Dissimilarity in Sulcal Width Patterns in the Cortex can be Used to Identify Patients With Schizophrenia With Extreme Deficits in Cognitive Performance.

Schizophr Bull 2021 03;47(2):552-561

Department of Psychiatry, UMCU Brain Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Schizophrenia is a biologically complex disorder with multiple regional deficits in cortical brain morphology. In addition, interindividual heterogeneity of cortical morphological metrics is larger in patients with schizophrenia when compared to healthy controls. Exploiting interindividual differences in the severity of cortical morphological deficits in patients instead of focusing on group averages may aid in detecting biologically informed homogeneous subgroups. The person-based similarity index (PBSI) of brain morphology indexes an individual's morphometric similarity across numerous cortical regions amongst a sample of healthy subjects. We extended the PBSI such that it indexes the morphometric similarity of an independent individual (eg, a patient) with respect to healthy control subjects. By employing a normative modeling approach on longitudinal data, we determined an individual's degree of morphometric dissimilarity to the norm. We calculated the PBSI for sulcal width (PBSI-SW) in patients with schizophrenia and healthy control subjects (164 patients and 164 healthy controls; 656 magnetic resonance imaging scans) and associated it with cognitive performance and cortical sulcation index. A subgroup of patients with markedly deviant PBSI-SW showed extreme deficits in cognitive performance and cortical sulcation. Progressive reduction of PBSI-SW in the schizophrenia group relative to healthy controls was driven by these deviating individuals. By explicitly leveraging interindividual differences in the severity of PBSI-SW deficits, neuroimaging-driven subgrouping of patients is feasible. As such, our results pave the way for future applications of morphometric similarity indices for subtyping of clinical populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbaa131DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7965061PMC
March 2021

The genetic architecture of the human cerebral cortex.

Science 2020 03;367(6484)

The cerebral cortex underlies our complex cognitive capabilities, yet little is known about the specific genetic loci that influence human cortical structure. To identify genetic variants that affect cortical structure, we conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of brain magnetic resonance imaging data from 51,665 individuals. We analyzed the surface area and average thickness of the whole cortex and 34 regions with known functional specializations. We identified 199 significant loci and found significant enrichment for loci influencing total surface area within regulatory elements that are active during prenatal cortical development, supporting the radial unit hypothesis. Loci that affect regional surface area cluster near genes in Wnt signaling pathways, which influence progenitor expansion and areal identity. Variation in cortical structure is genetically correlated with cognitive function, Parkinson's disease, insomnia, depression, neuroticism, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aay6690DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7295264PMC
March 2020

The Association Between Familial Risk and Brain Abnormalities Is Disease Specific: An ENIGMA-Relatives Study of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder.

Biol Psychiatry 2019 10 13;86(7):545-556. Epub 2019 Jun 13.

Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center, Institute of Living, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut; Tommy Fuss Center for Neuropsychiatric Disease Research, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Background: Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share genetic liability, and some structural brain abnormalities are common to both conditions. First-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia (FDRs-SZ) show similar brain abnormalities to patients, albeit with smaller effect sizes. Imaging findings in first-degree relatives of patients with bipolar disorder (FDRs-BD) have been inconsistent in the past, but recent studies report regionally greater volumes compared with control subjects.

Methods: We performed a meta-analysis of global and subcortical brain measures of 6008 individuals (1228 FDRs-SZ, 852 FDRs-BD, 2246 control subjects, 1016 patients with schizophrenia, 666 patients with bipolar disorder) from 34 schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorder family cohorts with standardized methods. Analyses were repeated with a correction for intracranial volume (ICV) and for the presence of any psychopathology in the relatives and control subjects.

Results: FDRs-BD had significantly larger ICV (d = +0.16, q < .05 corrected), whereas FDRs-SZ showed smaller thalamic volumes than control subjects (d = -0.12, q < .05 corrected). ICV explained the enlargements in the brain measures in FDRs-BD. In FDRs-SZ, after correction for ICV, total brain, cortical gray matter, cerebral white matter, cerebellar gray and white matter, and thalamus volumes were significantly smaller; the cortex was thinner (d < -0.09, q < .05 corrected); and third ventricle was larger (d = +0.15, q < .05 corrected). The findings were not explained by psychopathology in the relatives or control subjects.

Conclusions: Despite shared genetic liability, FDRs-SZ and FDRs-BD show a differential pattern of structural brain abnormalities, specifically a divergent effect in ICV. This may imply that the neurodevelopmental trajectories leading to brain anomalies in schizophrenia or bipolar disorder are distinct.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2019.03.985DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7068800PMC
October 2019
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