Publications by authors named "Elizabeth Consky"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The Proportion of Female Authors in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Literature Has not Changed in 20 Years.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2020 06 18;78(6):877-881. Epub 2020 Mar 18.

Associate Professor, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine; and Associate Chief, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA. Electronic address:

Purpose: Academic advancement often depends on publications and reflects the leadership within a profession. The present study compared the number of articles written by women in the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (JOMS) versus the number of women in the profession of oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS).

Materials And Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of articles published in JOMS at 3 time points (1995, 2005, and 2015). The primary predictor variables were author gender and the 3 time points (1995, 2005, and 2015). Gender was established by visual inspection. The primary outcome variable was the proportion of articles written by women, defined as number of articles written by a woman divided by the total number of female members in the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS). The inclusion criteria were 1) original, full-length research articles in JOMS, 2) authorship by a woman, and 3) articles reported from a US academic institution. A 2-tailed χ test was used. The rate of change in female authorship over time was analyzed using linear regression analysis, followed by the F test (statistical significance was set at P < .05).

Results: During the years examined, the number of first and last female authors ranged from 3 to 6.3%. Approximately 7% of oral-maxillofacial surgeons registered with AAOMS in 2015 were women. Comparing the expected proportion of female authorship according to the number of female surgeons registered with AAOMS, the proportions of female first authorship were significantly lower than expected in 1995 and 2015. Female authorship was found to be significantly less than expected. Using linear regression analysis, we found no statistically significant changes in the proportion of female first or last authorship in the period examined (P = .69 and P = .99, respectively).

Conclusions: During the years examined, we found no significant increase in female authorship in JOMS, demonstrating an area of opportunity to improve gender disparity in OMS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2020.03.011DOI Listing
June 2020

Nasal Framework Osteotomy: An Innovative Approach to Manage an Extremely Long Nose With Meningoencephalocele.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2019 Jun 12;77(6):1276.e1-1276.e6. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Associate Professor, Buali Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran.

Meningoencephlocele is a relatively rare deformity, usually characterized by penetration of brain or meningeal tissues through a defect in skull. This protruding tissue may affect facial structure and subtle to severe facial deformities may appear. Surgical treatments of these deformities are usually done by a team including a neurosurgeon and craniofacial surgeon. The conventional treatments includes several complicated operations to relocate herniating tissues, then correcting malformed facial structure. The nasal framework osteotomy, is an innovative approach that uses transfacial incisions to gain access to herniating tissue. Then, by completing the osteotomy around the nose, the entire nasal structure is lifted and transposed to it is original position. The authors believe that this technique may considerably reduce the complexity and risks of conventional approaches, while aesthetic demands are readily achieved at the same stage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2019.02.003DOI Listing
June 2019

Current Techniques in Fat Grafting.

Atlas Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Mar 8;26(1):7-13. Epub 2017 Dec 8.

Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cxom.2017.11.001DOI Listing
March 2018

Fat Grafting as an Adjunct to Facial Rejuvenation Procedures.

Atlas Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2018 Mar;26(1):51-57

Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cxom.2017.10.005DOI Listing
March 2018

Using Quality Improvement Methods to Implement an Early Childhood Oral Health Initiative: A Federally Qualified Health Center Pilot Study.

J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;41(5):351-357

Objectives: To assess the use of quality improvement (QI) methods to implement an early childhood oral health program (Baby Oral Health Program-bOHP) in four federally qualified health center (FQHC) dental clinics.

Study Design: Using a mixed-methods study design, survey responses, administrative data, QI project templates, and focus group measures were collected. Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles as mini-projects to improve the implementation of bOHP were examined. Data analysis included descriptive qualitative reviews and quantitative statistics at baseline, six, and 12 months following the intervention.

Results: Twenty-three dental team providers in one urban and three rural clinics participated. Successful QI mini-projects included shortening time period between accepted referral and patient visits, improved documentation of caregiver interview, and efficiency of the infant oral health examination. Lack of change in provider confidence was observed, regardless of years of practice (p=0.93), years of employment (p=0.39), and dental team age (p=0.85). Qualitative reviews highlighted mixed QI results related to training and limited resources invested on follow-up of QI implementation.

Conclusions: A low cost, low resource pilot QI program as part of bOHP implementation showed mixed success, highlighting the critical role of training, staff committment, and leadership support to assure sustainable oral health programs in high-risk populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17796/1053-4628-41.5.351DOI Listing
September 2017