Publications by authors named "Elizabeth A Fuller"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Multi-component communication intervention for children with autism: A randomized controlled trial.

Autism 2020 11 6;24(8):2104-2116. Epub 2020 Jul 6.

Vanderbilt University, USA.

Lay Abstract: This study reports the results of a randomized trial for preverbal preschoolers with autism that demonstrates the effects of multiple intervention strategies including caregiver training. About 50% of children with autism are not talking by age 3 and up to 30% of children with autism will remain minimally verbal past age 5. Interventions delivered by clinicians and caregivers have the greatest effects on spoken language and may reduce the rate of those who remain minimally verbal. Sixty-eight children ages 3-5 with autism and their caregivers participated in this randomized trial comparing the communication intervention to a comparison group. A brief, multi-component, communication intervention (including a speech-generating device) for children with autism that addresses core deficits may be effective in improving joint attention skills immediately following intervention and social communication skills 4 months following intervention. Future research is needed to understand for whom and under what conditions this intervention is most effective.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1362361320934558DOI Listing
November 2020

The Effects of the Early Start Denver Model for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Meta-Analysis.

Brain Sci 2020 Jun 12;10(6). Epub 2020 Jun 12.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of California, Davis MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA.

This meta-analysis examined the effects of the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM) for young children with autism on developmental outcome measures. The 12 included studies reported results from 640 children with autism across 44 unique effect sizes. The aggregated effect size, calculated using a robust variance estimation meta-analysis, was 0.357 ( = 0.024), which is a moderate effect size with a statistically significant overall weighted averaged that favored participants who received the ESDM compared to children in control groups, with moderate heterogeneity across studies. This result was largely driven by improvements in cognition ( = 0.412) and language ( = 0.408). There were no significant effects observed for measures of autism symptomology, adaptive behavior, social communication, or restrictive and repetitive behaviors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10060368DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7349854PMC
June 2020

The Effects of Early Intervention on Social Communication Outcomes for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Meta-analysis.

J Autism Dev Disord 2020 May;50(5):1683-1700

Vanderbilt University, 110 Magnolia Circle, Suite 314, Nashville, TN, 37203, USA.

This meta-analysis examined the effects of early interventions on social communication outcomes for young children with autism spectrum disorder. A systematic review of the literature included 1442 children (mean age 3.55 years) across 29 studies. The overall effect size of intervention on social communication outcomes was significant (g = 0.36). The age of the participants was related to the treatment effect size on social communication outcomes, with maximum benefits occurring at age 3.81 years. Results did not differ significantly depending on the person implementing the intervention. However, significantly larger effect sizes were observed in studies with context-bound outcome measures. The findings of this meta-analysis highlight the need for further research examining specific components of interventions associated with greater and more generalized gains.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-019-03927-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7350882PMC
May 2020

Enhanced milieu teaching for children with autism spectrum disorder in South Africa.

Int J Speech Lang Pathol 2019 12 6;21(6):635-645. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Department of Special Education, The Kidtalk Project, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.

: Efficient and effective interventions are required to meet the communication needs of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). However, most children with ASD living in South Africa do not receive individualised interventions.: This multiple baseline study examined the effects of therapist-implemented enhanced milieu teaching (EMT) on the diversity and frequency of spoken language of three children with ASD in South Africa.: A moderate functional relation was demonstrated between the introduction of EMT and increases in (1) the number of different words and (2) the number of spontaneous utterances used by each participant. Some evidence of generalisation to novel partners and contexts was observed.: Results indicated that EMT may be effective for improving communication in South African children with ASD. Implications for clinical practice and cultural and linguistic adaptations are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17549507.2018.1559357DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7373342PMC
December 2019