Publications by authors named "Elizabeth A Buzney"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Strategies for effective medical student education in dermatology during the COVID-19 pandemic.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2021 01 20;84(1):e33-e34. Epub 2020 Aug 20.

Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.08.068DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7439964PMC
January 2021

Long-term use of home narrowband ultraviolet B phototherapy demonstrates high patient satisfaction, compliance, and low rates of adverse effects: A survey study.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2020 Jul 19;83(1):267-269. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.03.021DOI Listing
July 2020

Shedding Light on Phototherapy.

Dermatol Clin 2020 Jan 16;38(1):xiii. Epub 2019 Oct 16.

Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Brigham Dermatology Associates, 221 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.det.2019.09.002DOI Listing
January 2020

Creating and Managing a Phototherapy Center.

Dermatol Clin 2020 Jan 18;38(1):137-143. Epub 2019 Oct 18.

Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 221 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

Phototherapy is a safe and effective treatment for many benign and malignant inflammatory cutaneous diseases. Treatment courses require consistent visits over the course of weeks to months, and one barrier for patients in accessing this treatment is the lack of a geographically convenient phototherapy center. To expand access, new phototherapy centers can be created, and this can be done in a series of steps. These include considering the physical space, anticipating the finances, laying the operational groundwork, and establishing a consent and education process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.det.2019.08.014DOI Listing
January 2020

Optimizing Narrowband UVB Phototherapy Regimens for Psoriasis.

Dermatol Clin 2020 Jan 18;38(1):1-10. Epub 2019 Oct 18.

Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

Psoriasis is a chronic, autoimmune condition characterized by abnormal epidermal hyperproliferation affecting about 3.2% of adults in the United States. Narrowband UVB (NBUVB) is a commonly used phototherapy option for patients with psoriasis and is an effective first-line therapy for generalized plaque psoriasis. This article covers fundamental considerations for physicians using NBUVB and highlights changes in the newest guideline recommendations for phototherapy treatment. Protocols for treatment initiation, maintenance, dose increases, and maintenance are compared and discussed. Readers will achieve a greater understanding of the fundamentals of NBUVB phototherapy and promising advances in the field, including home phototherapy and combination treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.det.2019.08.001DOI Listing
January 2020

Perceptions of U.S. dermatology residency program directors regarding the adequacy of phototherapy training during residency.

Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed 2017 Nov 25;33(6):321-325. Epub 2017 Sep 25.

Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Background/purpose: Phototherapy utilization has declined over the last 20 years despite its efficacy and cost-effectiveness. Adequacy of phototherapy training in residency may be a contributing factor. The purpose of this study was to evaluate perceptions of U.S. dermatology residency program directors (PDs) regarding the effectiveness of their programs' phototherapy training and what constitutes adequate phototherapy education.

Methods: A questionnaire was sent to PDs to assess phototherapy training within their program; aspects such as dedicated time, exposure to different modalities, and barriers to resident education were surveyed. We assessed the statistical association between these aspects and the perception by PDs that a program's training was adequate. Statistical testing was reported using Fisher's exact tests.

Results: A total of 42 PDs responded. Residency training in oral psoralen and ultraviolet A therapy (PUVA), home phototherapy, and excimer laser, respectively, is not provided in 19.0%, 31.0%, and 47.6% of programs. 38.1% of programs provide ≤5 hours of phototherapy training over 3 years of training. 59.5% of PDs cited lack of curriculum time as the most common barrier to phototherapy education. 19.0% of PDs reported completely adequate phototherapy training, which was significantly associated with inclusion of faculty-led didactics, assigned reading, or hands-on clinical training in the curriculum.

Conclusions: There is a mismatch between the resources devoted to phototherapy education and the need for dedicated training reported by PDs. Limited time is allocated to phototherapy training during dermatology residency, and a large majority of PDs do not feel that the phototherapy training offered is completely adequate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/phpp.12347DOI Listing
November 2017

Hypersensitivity reaction as a harbinger of acute myeloid leukemia: a case report and review of the literature.

Ann Dermatol 2015 Apr 24;27(2):190-3. Epub 2015 Mar 24.

Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Cutaneous paraneoplastic syndromes comprise a broad spectrum of cutaneous reactions to an underlying malignancy. These dermatoses are not the result of metastatic spread to the skin, but rather a reaction to the presence of malignancy. Cutaneous paraneoplastic syndromes often precede the identification of a malignancy. We describe the case of a 79-year-old man with a six-month history of recalcitrant treatment- resistant dermatitis. A complete blood count test performed at the time of initial presentation was normal. The patient ultimately presented with erythroderma and was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The evolution of the dermatitis to erythroderma coincided with the clinical presentation of AML, and was therefore considered to be a paraneoplastic syndrome. The patient decided against therapy and died seven weeks after diagnosis. Physicians should consider a cutaneous paraneoplastic syndrome when faced with dynamic recalcitrant dermatoses that are difficult to treat and decide on laboratory testing accordingly. Patients should be evaluated regularly for two to three years after initial diagnosis with a physical exam and review of systems to monitor for signs and symptoms of malignancy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5021/ad.2015.27.2.190DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4377409PMC
April 2015

Metastatic eccrine porocarcinoma after Mohs micrographic surgery: a case report.

J Clin Oncol 2012 Jul 11;30(21):e188-91. Epub 2012 Jun 11.

University of Cincinnati School of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2011.40.6843DOI Listing
July 2012

A critical assessment of composite and coprimary endpoints: a complex problem.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2008 Nov;59(5):890-6

Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2008.05.021DOI Listing
November 2008