Publications by authors named "Elise Lim"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Exome sequence association study of levels and longitudinal change of cardiovascular risk factor phenotypes in European Americans and African Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

Genet Epidemiol 2021 Sep 24;45(6):651-663. Epub 2021 Jun 24.

Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics, and Environmental Sciences, Human Genetics Center, School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas, USA.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is responsible for 31% of all deaths worldwide. Among CVD risk factors are age, race, increased systolic blood pressure (BP), and dyslipidemia. Both BP and blood lipids levels change with age, with a dose-dependent relationship between the cumulative exposure to hyperlipidemia and the risk of CVD. We performed an exome sequence association study using longitudinal data with up to 7805 European Americans (EAs) and 3171 African Americans (AAs) from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. We assessed associations of common (minor allele frequency > 5%) nonsynonymous and splice-site variants and gene-based sets of rare variants with levels and with longitudinal change of seven CVD risk factor phenotypes (BP traits: systolic BP, diastolic BP, pulse pressure; lipids traits: triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C]). Furthermore, we investigated the relationship of the identified variants and genes with select CVD endpoints. We identified two novel genes: DCLK3 associated with the change of HDL-C levels in AAs and RAB7L1 associated with the change of LDL-C levels in EAs. RAB7L1 is further associated with an increased risk of heart failure in ARIC EAs. Investigation of the contribution of genetic factors to the longitudinal change of CVD risk factor phenotypes promotes our understanding of the etiology of CVD outcomes, stressing the importance of incorporating the longitudinal structure of the cohort data in future analyses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gepi.22390DOI Listing
September 2021

Multi-ancestry genome-wide gene-sleep interactions identify novel loci for blood pressure.

Mol Psychiatry 2021 Apr 15. Epub 2021 Apr 15.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Long and short sleep duration are associated with elevated blood pressure (BP), possibly through effects on molecular pathways that influence neuroendocrine and vascular systems. To gain new insights into the genetic basis of sleep-related BP variation, we performed genome-wide gene by short or long sleep duration interaction analyses on four BP traits (systolic BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure) across five ancestry groups in two stages using 2 degree of freedom (df) joint test followed by 1df test of interaction effects. Primary multi-ancestry analysis in 62,969 individuals in stage 1 identified three novel gene by sleep interactions that were replicated in an additional 59,296 individuals in stage 2 (stage 1 + 2 P < 5 × 10), including rs7955964 (FIGNL2/ANKRD33) that increases BP among long sleepers, and rs73493041 (SNORA26/C9orf170) and rs10406644 (KCTD15/LSM14A) that increase BP among short sleepers (P < 5 × 10). Secondary ancestry-specific analysis identified another novel gene by long sleep interaction at rs111887471 (TRPC3/KIAA1109) in individuals of African ancestry (P = 2 × 10). Combined stage 1 and 2 analyses additionally identified significant gene by long sleep interactions at 10 loci including MKLN1 and RGL3/ELAVL3 previously associated with BP, and significant gene by short sleep interactions at 10 loci including C2orf43 previously associated with BP (P < 10). 2df test also identified novel loci for BP after modeling sleep that has known functions in sleep-wake regulation, nervous and cardiometabolic systems. This study indicates that sleep and primary mechanisms regulating BP may interact to elevate BP level, suggesting novel insights into sleep-related BP regulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41380-021-01087-0DOI Listing
April 2021

Discovery and fine-mapping of height loci via high-density imputation of GWASs in individuals of African ancestry.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 04 12;108(4):564-582. Epub 2021 Mar 12.

The Charles R. Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA.

Although many loci have been associated with height in European ancestry populations, very few have been identified in African ancestry individuals. Furthermore, many of the known loci have yet to be generalized to and fine-mapped within a large-scale African ancestry sample. We performed sex-combined and sex-stratified meta-analyses in up to 52,764 individuals with height and genome-wide genotyping data from the African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium (AAAGC). We additionally combined our African ancestry meta-analysis results with published European genome-wide association study (GWAS) data. In the African ancestry analyses, we identified three novel loci (SLC4A3, NCOA2, ECD/FAM149B1) in sex-combined results and two loci (CRB1, KLF6) in women only. In the African plus European sex-combined GWAS, we identified an additional three novel loci (RCCD1, G6PC3, CEP95) which were equally driven by AAAGC and European results. Among 39 genome-wide significant signals at known loci, conditioning index SNPs from European studies identified 20 secondary signals. Two of the 20 new secondary signals and none of the 8 novel loci had minor allele frequencies (MAF) < 5%. Of 802 known European height signals, 643 displayed directionally consistent associations with height, of which 205 were nominally significant (p < 0.05) in the African ancestry sex-combined sample. Furthermore, 148 of 241 loci contained ≤20 variants in the credible sets that jointly account for 99% of the posterior probability of driving the associations. In summary, trans-ethnic meta-analyses revealed novel signals and further improved fine-mapping of putative causal variants in loci shared between African and European ancestry populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.02.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8059339PMC
April 2021

Small Dense Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Is the Most Atherogenic Lipoprotein Parameter in the Prospective Framingham Offspring Study.

J Am Heart Assoc 2021 02 15;10(5):e019140. Epub 2021 Feb 15.

Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory Jean Mayer United States Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University Boston MA.

Background Elevated plasma levels of direct low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), small dense LDL-C (sdLDL-C), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) triglycerides, triglycerides, triglyceride-rich lipoprotein cholesterol, remnant lipoprotein particle cholesterol, and lipoprotein(a) have all been associated with incident atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Our goal was to assess which parameters were most strongly associated with ASCVD risk. Methods and Results Plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, direct LDL-C, sdLDL-C, LDL triglycerides, remnant lipoprotein particle cholesterol, triglyceride-rich lipoprotein cholesterol, and lipoprotein(a) were measured using standardized automated analysis (coefficients of variation, <5.0%) in samples from 3094 fasting subjects free of ASCVD. Of these subjects, 20.2% developed ASCVD over 16 years. On univariate analysis, all ASCVD risk factors were significantly associated with incident ASCVD, as well as the following specialized lipoprotein parameters: sdLDL-C, LDL triglycerides, triglycerides, triglyceride-rich lipoprotein cholesterol, remnant lipoprotein particle cholesterol, and direct LDL-C. Only sdLDL-C, direct LDL-C, and lipoprotein(a) were significant on multivariate analysis and net reclassification after adjustment for standard risk factors (age, sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, total cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol). Using the pooled cohort equation, many specialized lipoprotein parameters individually added significant information, but no parameter added significant information once sdLDL-C (hazard ratio, 1.42; <0.0001) was in the model. These results for sdLDL-C were confirmed by adjusted discordance analysis versus calculated non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, in contrast to LDL triglycerides. Conclusions sdLDL-C, direct LDL-C, and lipoprotein(a) all contributed significantly to ASCVD risk on multivariate analysis, but no parameter added significant risk information to the pooled cohort equation once sdLDL-C was in the model. Our data indicate that small dense LDL is the most atherogenic lipoprotein parameter.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.120.019140DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8174280PMC
February 2021

Methylome-wide association study of central adiposity implicates genes involved in immune and endocrine systems.

Epigenomics 2020 09 9;12(17):1483-1499. Epub 2020 Sep 9.

Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

We conducted a methylome-wide association study to examine associations between DNA methylation in whole blood and central adiposity and body fat distribution, measured as waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio and waist-to-height ratio adjusted for body mass index, in 2684 African-American adults in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. We validated significantly associated cytosine-phosphate-guanine methylation sites (CpGs) among adults using the Women's Health Initiative and Framingham Heart Study participants (combined n = 5743) and generalized associations in adolescents from The Raine Study (n = 820). We identified 11 CpGs that were robustly associated with one or more central adiposity trait in adults and two in adolescents, including CpG site associations near , ,  and that had not previously been associated with obesity-related traits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/epi-2019-0276DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7923253PMC
September 2020

Efficient gene-environment interaction tests for large biobank-scale sequencing studies.

Genet Epidemiol 2020 11 30;44(8):908-923. Epub 2020 Aug 30.

Human Genetics Center, Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas.

Complex human diseases are affected by genetic and environmental risk factors and their interactions. Gene-environment interaction (GEI) tests for aggregate genetic variant sets have been developed in recent years. However, existing statistical methods become rate limiting for large biobank-scale sequencing studies with correlated samples. We propose efficient Mixed-model Association tests for GEne-Environment interactions (MAGEE), for testing GEI between an aggregate variant set and environmental exposures on quantitative and binary traits in large-scale sequencing studies with related individuals. Joint tests for the aggregate genetic main effects and GEI effects are also developed. A null generalized linear mixed model adjusting for covariates but without any genetic effects is fit only once in a whole genome GEI analysis, thereby vastly reducing the overall computational burden. Score tests for variant sets are performed as a combination of genetic burden and variance component tests by accounting for the genetic main effects using matrix projections. The computational complexity is dramatically reduced in a whole genome GEI analysis, which makes MAGEE scalable to hundreds of thousands of individuals. We applied MAGEE to the exome sequencing data of 41,144 related individuals from the UK Biobank, and the analysis of 18,970 protein coding genes finished within 10.4 CPU hours.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gepi.22351DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7754763PMC
November 2020

Role of Rare and Low-Frequency Variants in Gene-Alcohol Interactions on Plasma Lipid Levels.

Circ Genom Precis Med 2020 08 8;13(4):e002772. Epub 2020 Jun 8.

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health (L.F.B., J.A.S., W.Z., S.L.R.K.), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

Background: Alcohol intake influences plasma lipid levels, and such effects may be moderated by genetic variants. We aimed to characterize the role of aggregated rare and low-frequency protein-coding variants in gene by alcohol consumption interactions associated with fasting plasma lipid levels.

Methods: In the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium, fasting plasma triglycerides and high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were measured in 34 153 individuals with European ancestry from 5 discovery studies and 32 277 individuals from 6 replication studies. Rare and low-frequency functional protein-coding variants (minor allele frequency, ≤5%) measured by an exome array were aggregated by genes and evaluated by a gene-environment interaction test and a joint test of genetic main and gene-environment interaction effects. Two dichotomous self-reported alcohol consumption variables, current drinker, defined as any recurrent drinking behavior, and regular drinker, defined as the subset of current drinkers who consume at least 2 drinks per week, were considered.

Results: We discovered and replicated 21 gene-lipid associations at 13 known lipid loci through the joint test. Eight loci (, , , , , , , and ) remained significant after conditioning on the common index single-nucleotide polymorphism identified by previous genome-wide association studies, suggesting an independent role for rare and low-frequency variants at these loci. One significant gene-alcohol interaction on triglycerides in a novel locus was significantly discovered (=6.65×10 for the interaction test) and replicated at nominal significance level (=0.013) in .

Conclusions: In conclusion, this study applied new gene-based statistical approaches and suggested that rare and low-frequency genetic variants interacted with alcohol consumption on lipid levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCGEN.119.002772DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7442680PMC
August 2020

A unified method for rare variant analysis of gene-environment interactions.

Stat Med 2020 03 4;39(6):801-813. Epub 2019 Dec 4.

Department of Biostatistics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts.

Advanced technology in whole-genome sequencing has offered the opportunity to comprehensively investigate the genetic contribution, particularly rare variants, to complex traits. Several region-based tests have been developed to jointly model the marginal effect of rare variants, but methods to detect gene-environment (GE) interactions are underdeveloped. Identifying the modification effects of environmental factors on genetic risk poses a considerable challenge. To tackle this challenge, we develop a method to detect GE interactions for rare variants using generalized linear mixed effect model. The proposed method can accommodate either binary or continuous traits in related or unrelated samples. Under this model, genetic main effects, GE interactions, and sample relatedness are modeled as random effects. We adopt a kernel-based method to leverage the joint information across rare variants and implement variance component score tests to reduce the computational burden. Our simulation studies of continuous and binary traits show that the proposed method maintains correct type I error rates and appropriate power under various scenarios, such as genotype main effects and GE interaction effects in opposite directions and varying the proportion of causal variants in the model. We apply our method in the Framingham Heart Study to test GE interaction of smoking on body mass index or overweight status and replicate the Cholinergic Receptor Nicotinic Beta 4 gene association reported in previous large consortium meta-analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism-smoking interaction. Our proposed set-based GE test is computationally efficient and is applicable to both binary and continuous phenotypes, while appropriately accounting for familial or cryptic relatedness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/sim.8446DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7261513PMC
March 2020

Multi-ancestry sleep-by-SNP interaction analysis in 126,926 individuals reveals lipid loci stratified by sleep duration.

Nat Commun 2019 11 12;10(1):5121. Epub 2019 Nov 12.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands.

Both short and long sleep are associated with an adverse lipid profile, likely through different biological pathways. To elucidate the biology of sleep-associated adverse lipid profile, we conduct multi-ancestry genome-wide sleep-SNP interaction analyses on three lipid traits (HDL-c, LDL-c and triglycerides). In the total study sample (discovery + replication) of 126,926 individuals from 5 different ancestry groups, when considering either long or short total sleep time interactions in joint analyses, we identify 49 previously unreported lipid loci, and 10 additional previously unreported lipid loci in a restricted sample of European-ancestry cohorts. In addition, we identify new gene-sleep interactions for known lipid loci such as LPL and PCSK9. The previously unreported lipid loci have a modest explained variance in lipid levels: most notable, gene-short-sleep interactions explain 4.25% of the variance in triglyceride level. Collectively, these findings contribute to our understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in sleep-associated adverse lipid profiles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-12958-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6851116PMC
November 2019

Direct Versus Calculated LDL Cholesterol and C-Reactive Protein in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment in the Framingham Offspring Study.

Clin Chem 2019 09 25;65(9):1102-1114. Epub 2019 Jun 25.

Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University and Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA;

Background: Increases in circulating LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentrations are significant risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We assessed direct LDL-C and hsCRP concentrations compared to standard risk factors in the Framingham Offspring Study.

Methods: We used stored frozen plasma samples (-80 °C) obtained after an overnight fast from 3147 male and female participants (mean age, 58 years) free of CVD at cycle 6 of the Framingham Offspring Study. Overall, 677 participants (21.5%) had a CVD end point over a median of 16.0 years of follow-up. Total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), direct LDL-C (Denka Seiken and Kyowa Medex methods), and hsCRP (Dade Behring method) concentrations were measured by automated analysis. LDL-C was also calculated by both the Friedewald and Martin methods.

Results: Considering all CVD outcomes on univariate analysis, significant factors included standard risk factors (age, hypertension, HDL-C, hypertension treatment, sex, diabetes, smoking, and TC concentration) and nonstandard risk factors (non-HDL-C, direct LDL-C and calculated LDL-C, TG, and hsCRP concentrations). On multivariate analysis, only the Denka Seiken direct LDL-C and the Dade Behring hsCRP were still significant on Cox regression analysis and improved the net risk reclassification index, but with modest effects. Discordance analysis confirmed the benefit of the Denka Seiken direct LDL-C method for prospective hard CVD endpoints (new-onset myocardial infarction, stroke, and/or CVD death).

Conclusions: Our data indicate that the Denka Seiken direct LDL-C and Dade Behring hsCRP measurements add significant, but modest, information about CVD risk, compared to standard risk factors and/or calculated LDL-C.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1373/clinchem.2019.304600DOI Listing
September 2019

Multi-ancestry genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study of 387,272 individuals identifies new loci associated with serum lipids.

Nat Genet 2019 04 29;51(4):636-648. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.

The concentrations of high- and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides are influenced by smoking, but it is unknown whether genetic associations with lipids may be modified by smoking. We conducted a multi-ancestry genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study in 133,805 individuals with follow-up in an additional 253,467 individuals. Combined meta-analyses identified 13 new loci associated with lipids, some of which were detected only because association differed by smoking status. Additionally, we demonstrate the importance of including diverse populations, particularly in studies of interactions with lifestyle factors, where genomic and lifestyle differences by ancestry may contribute to novel findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-019-0378-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6467258PMC
April 2019

Network analysis of drug effect on triglyceride-associated DNA methylation.

BMC Proc 2018 17;12(Suppl 9):27. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

1Department of Biostatistics, Boston University, 801 Massachusetts Avenue 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 USA.

Background: DNA methylation, an epigenetic modification, can be affected by environmental factors and thus regulate gene expression levels that can lead to alterations of certain phenotypes. Network analysis has been used successfully to discover gene sets that are expressed differently across multiple disease states and suggest possible pathways of disease progression. We applied this framework to compare DNA methylation levels before and after lipid-lowering medication and to identify modules that differ topologically between the two time points, revealing the association between lipid medication and these triglyceride-related methylation sites.

Methods: We performed quality control using beta-mixture quantile normalization on 463,995 cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites and deleted problematic sites, resulting in 423,004 probes. We identified 14,850 probes that were nominally associated with triglycerides prior to treatment and performed weighted gene correlation network analysis (WGCNA) to construct pre- and posttreatment methylation networks of these probes. We then applied both WGCNA module preservation and generalized Hamming distance (GHD) to identify modules with topological differences between the pre- and posttreatment. For modules with structural changes between 2 time points, we performed pathway-enrichment analysis to gain further insight into the biological function of the genes from these modules.

Results: Six triglyceride-associated modules were identified using pretreatment methylation probes. The same 3 modules were not preserved in posttreatment data using both the module-preservation and the GHD methods. Top-enriched pathways for the 3 differentially methylated modules are sphingolipid signaling pathway, proteoglycans in cancer, and metabolic pathways ( values < 0.005). One module in particular included an enrichment of lipid-related pathways among the top results.

Conclusions: The same 3 modules, which were differentially methylated between pre- and posttreatment, were identified using both WGCNA module-preservation and GHD methods. Pathway analysis revealed that triglyceride-associated modules contain groups of genes that are involved in lipid signaling and metabolism. These 3 modules may provide insight into the effect of fenofibrate on changes in triglyceride levels and these methylation sites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12919-018-0130-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6157190PMC
September 2018

Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity - A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults.

PLoS Genet 2017 Apr 27;13(4):e1006528. Epub 2017 Apr 27.

Estonian Genome Center, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.

Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults of European (n = 180,423) or other ancestry (n = 20,029). We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and 77% as physically active. While we replicate the interaction with PA for the strongest known obesity-risk locus in the FTO gene, of which the effect is attenuated by ~30% in physically active individuals compared to inactive individuals, we do not identify additional loci that are sensitive to PA. In additional genome-wide meta-analyses adjusting for PA and interaction with PA, we identify 11 novel adiposity loci, suggesting that accounting for PA or other environmental factors that contribute to variation in adiposity may facilitate gene discovery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1006528DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5407576PMC
April 2017

Genome-wide meta-analysis of 241,258 adults accounting for smoking behaviour identifies novel loci for obesity traits.

Nat Commun 2017 04 26;8:14977. Epub 2017 Apr 26.

Centre for Genetic Origins of Health and Disease, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia.

Few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) account for environmental exposures, like smoking, potentially impacting the overall trait variance when investigating the genetic contribution to obesity-related traits. Here, we use GWAS data from 51,080 current smokers and 190,178 nonsmokers (87% European descent) to identify loci influencing BMI and central adiposity, measured as waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio both adjusted for BMI. We identify 23 novel genetic loci, and 9 loci with convincing evidence of gene-smoking interaction (GxSMK) on obesity-related traits. We show consistent direction of effect for all identified loci and significance for 18 novel and for 5 interaction loci in an independent study sample. These loci highlight novel biological functions, including response to oxidative stress, addictive behaviour, and regulatory functions emphasizing the importance of accounting for environment in genetic analyses. Our results suggest that tobacco smoking may alter the genetic susceptibility to overall adiposity and body fat distribution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14977DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5414044PMC
April 2017

Visceral Adipose Tissue Is Associated With Bone Microarchitecture in the Framingham Osteoporosis Study.

J Bone Miner Res 2017 01 6;32(1):143-150. Epub 2016 Sep 6.

Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, MA, USA.

Obesity has been traditionally considered to protect the skeleton against osteoporosis and fracture. Recently, body fat, specifically visceral adipose tissue (VAT), has been associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD) and increased risk for some types of fractures. We studied VAT and bone microarchitecture in 710 participants (58% women, age 61.3 ± 7.7 years) from the Framingham Offspring cohort to determine whether cortical and trabecular BMD and microarchitecture differ according to the amount of VAT. VAT was measured from CT imaging of the abdomen. Cortical and trabecular BMD and microarchitecture were measured at the distal tibia and radius using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT). We focused on 10 bone parameters: cortical BMD (Ct.BMD), cortical tissue mineral density (Ct.TMD), cortical porosity (Ct.Po), cortical thickness (Ct.Th), cortical bone area fraction (Ct.A/Tt.A), trabecular density (Tb.BMD), trabecular number (Tb.N), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), total area (Tt.Ar), and failure load (FL) from micro-finite element analysis. We assessed the association between sex-specific quartiles of VAT and BMD, microarchitecture, and strength in all participants and stratified by sex. All analyses were adjusted for age, sex, and in women, menopausal status, then repeated adjusting for body mass index (BMI) or weight. At the radius and tibia, Ct.Th, Ct.A/Tt.A, Tb.BMD, Tb.N, and FL were positively associated with VAT (all p-trend <0.05), but no other associations were statistically significant except for higher levels of cortical porosity with higher VAT in the radius. Most of these associations were only observed in women, and were no longer significant when adjusting for BMI or weight. Higher amounts of VAT are associated with greater BMD and better microstructure of the peripheral skeleton despite some suggestions of significant deleterious changes in cortical measures in the non-weight bearing radius. Associations were no longer significant after adjustment for BMI or weight, suggesting that the effects of VAT may not have a substantial effect on the skeleton independent of BMI or weight. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.2931DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5316419PMC
January 2017
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