Publications by authors named "Elise Douard"

6 Publications

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Genome-wide analysis of gene dosage in 24,092 individuals estimates that 10,000 genes modulate cognitive ability.

Mol Psychiatry 2021 Jan 7. Epub 2021 Jan 7.

The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Genomic copy number variants (CNVs) are routinely identified and reported back to patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, but their quantitative effects on essential traits such as cognitive ability are poorly documented. We have recently shown that the effect size of deletions on cognitive ability can be statistically predicted using measures of intolerance to haploinsufficiency. However, the effect sizes of duplications remain unknown. It is also unknown if the effect of multigenic CNVs are driven by a few genes intolerant to haploinsufficiency or distributed across tolerant genes as well. Here, we identified all CNVs > 50 kilobases in 24,092 individuals from unselected and autism cohorts with assessments of general intelligence. Statistical models used measures of intolerance to haploinsufficiency of genes included in CNVs to predict their effect size on intelligence. Intolerant genes decrease general intelligence by 0.8 and 2.6 points of intelligence quotient when duplicated or deleted, respectively. Effect sizes showed no heterogeneity across cohorts. Validation analyses demonstrated that models could predict CNV effect sizes with 78% accuracy. Data on the inheritance of 27,766 CNVs showed that deletions and duplications with the same effect size on intelligence occur de novo at the same frequency. We estimated that around 10,000 intolerant and tolerant genes negatively affect intelligence when deleted, and less than 2% have large effect sizes. Genes encompassed in CNVs were not enriched in any GOterms but gene regulation and brain expression were GOterms overrepresented in the intolerant subgroup. Such pervasive effects on cognition may be related to emergent properties of the genome not restricted to a limited number of biological pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41380-020-00985-zDOI Listing
January 2021

Mutations associated with neuropsychiatric conditions delineate functional brain connectivity dimensions contributing to autism and schizophrenia.

Nat Commun 2020 10 19;11(1):5272. Epub 2020 Oct 19.

Sainte Justine Hospital Research Center, University of Montreal, 3175 Chemin de la Côte-Sainte-Catherine, Montreal, QC, H3T 1C5, Canada.

16p11.2 and 22q11.2 Copy Number Variants (CNVs) confer high risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), schizophrenia (SZ), and Attention-Deficit-Hyperactivity-Disorder (ADHD), but their impact on functional connectivity (FC) remains unclear. Here we report an analysis of resting-state FC using magnetic resonance imaging data from 101 CNV carriers, 755 individuals with idiopathic ASD, SZ, or ADHD and 1,072 controls. We characterize CNV FC-signatures and use them to identify dimensions contributing to complex idiopathic conditions. CNVs have large mirror effects on FC at the global and regional level. Thalamus, somatomotor, and posterior insula regions play a critical role in dysconnectivity shared across deletions, duplications, idiopathic ASD, SZ but not ADHD. Individuals with higher similarity to deletion FC-signatures exhibit worse cognitive and behavioral symptoms. Deletion similarities identified at the connectivity level could be related to the redundant associations observed genome-wide between gene expression spatial patterns and FC-signatures. Results may explain why many CNVs affect a similar range of neuropsychiatric symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-18997-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7573583PMC
October 2020

Effect Sizes of Deletions and Duplications on Autism Risk Across the Genome.

Am J Psychiatry 2021 01 11;178(1):87-98. Epub 2020 Sep 11.

Université de Montréal, Montreal (Douard, Zeribi, Schramm, Tamer, Loum, Nowak, Lord, Moreau, Huguet, Jacquemont); UHC Sainte-Justine Research Center, Montreal (Douard, Zeribi, Schramm, Tamer, Loum, Nowak, Saci, Lord, Rodríguez-Herreros, Jean-Louis, Moreau, Huguet, Jacquemont); Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Schramm, Greenwood); Sensory-Motor Laboratory, Jules-Gonin Eye Hospital, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland (Rodríguez-Herreros); Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences (Loth) and Center for Population Neuroscience and Stratified Medicine (Schumann), Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London; Hospital for Sick Children and Departments of Physiology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto (Pausova); Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University, Montreal (Elsabbagh); Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, and Department of Genetics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia (Almasy); Department of Psychiatry, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (Glahn); Human Genetics and Cognitive Functions, Institut Pasteur, Université de Paris, Paris (Bourgeron); Département de Sciences de la Décision, HEC Montreal, Montreal (Labbe); Bloorview Research Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto (Paus); Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto (Paus); Centre de Recherche de CIUSSS-NIM, Montreal (Mottron); Département de Psychiatrie, Université de Montréal, Montreal (Mottron); Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, Gerald Bronfman Department of Oncology, and Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal (Greenwood).

Objective: Deleterious copy number variants (CNVs) are identified in up to 20% of individuals with autism. However, levels of autism risk conferred by most rare CNVs remain unknown. The authors recently developed statistical models to estimate the effect size on IQ of all CNVs, including undocumented ones. In this study, the authors extended this model to autism susceptibility.

Methods: The authors identified CNVs in two autism populations (Simons Simplex Collection and MSSNG) and two unselected populations (IMAGEN and Saguenay Youth Study). Statistical models were used to test nine quantitative variables associated with genes encompassed in CNVs to explain their effects on IQ, autism susceptibility, and behavioral domains.

Results: The "probability of being loss-of-function intolerant" (pLI) best explains the effect of CNVs on IQ and autism risk. Deleting 1 point of pLI decreases IQ by 2.6 points in autism and unselected populations. The effect of duplications on IQ is threefold smaller. Autism susceptibility increases when deleting or duplicating any point of pLI. This is true for individuals with high or low IQ and after removing de novo and known recurrent neuropsychiatric CNVs. When CNV effects on IQ are accounted for, autism susceptibility remains mostly unchanged for duplications but decreases for deletions. Model estimates for autism risk overlap with previously published observations. Deletions and duplications differentially affect social communication, behavior, and phonological memory, whereas both equally affect motor skills.

Conclusions: Autism risk conferred by duplications is less influenced by IQ compared with deletions. The model applied in this study, trained on CNVs encompassing >4,500 genes, suggests highly polygenic properties of gene dosage with respect to autism risk and IQ loss. These models will help to interpret CNVs identified in the clinic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2020.19080834DOI Listing
January 2021

A framework for the investigation of rare genetic disorders in neuropsychiatry.

Nat Med 2019 10 23;25(10):1477-1487. Epub 2019 Sep 23.

Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Departments of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

De novo and inherited rare genetic disorders (RGDs) are a major cause of human morbidity, frequently involving neuropsychiatric symptoms. Recent advances in genomic technologies and data sharing have revolutionized the identification and diagnosis of RGDs, presenting an opportunity to elucidate the mechanisms underlying neuropsychiatric disorders by investigating the pathophysiology of high-penetrance genetic risk factors. Here we seek out the best path forward for achieving these goals. We think future research will require consistent approaches across multiple RGDs and developmental stages, involving both the characterization of shared neuropsychiatric dimensions in humans and the identification of neurobiological commonalities in model systems. A coordinated and concerted effort across patients, families, researchers, clinicians and institutions, including rapid and broad sharing of data, is now needed to translate these discoveries into urgently needed therapies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-019-0581-5DOI Listing
October 2019

Estimating the effect size of the 15Q11.2 BP1-BP2 deletion and its contribution to neurodevelopmental symptoms: recommendations for practice.

J Med Genet 2019 10 26;56(10):701-710. Epub 2019 Aug 26.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Montreal, Montreal, Québec, Canada

Background: The 15q11.2 deletion is frequently identified in the neurodevelopmental clinic. Case-control studies have associated the 15q11.2 deletion with neurodevelopmental disorders, and clinical case series have attempted to delineate a microdeletion syndrome with considerable phenotypic variability. The literature on this deletion is extensive and confusing, which is a challenge for genetic counselling. The aim of this study was to estimate the effect size of the 15q11.2 deletion and quantify its contribution to neurodevelopmental disorders.

Methods: We performed meta-analyses on new and previously published case-control studies and used statistical models trained in unselected populations with cognitive assessments. We used new (n=241) and previously published (n=150) data from a clinically referred group of deletion carriers. 15q11.2 duplications (new n=179 and previously published n=35) were used as a neutral control variant.

Results: The deletion decreases IQ by 4.3 points. The estimated ORs and respective frequencies in deletion carriers for intellectual disabilities, schizophrenia and epilepsy are 1.7 (3.4%), 1.5 (2%) and 3.1 (2.1%), respectively. There is no increased risk for heart malformations and autism. In the clinically referred group, the frequency and nature of symptoms in deletions are not different from those observed in carriers of the 15q11.2 duplication suggesting that most of the reported symptoms are due to ascertainment bias.

Conclusions: We recommend that the deletion should be classified as 'pathogenic of mild effect size'. Since it explains only a small proportion of the phenotypic variance in carriers, it is not worth discussing in the developmental clinic or in a prenatal setting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2018-105879DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6817694PMC
October 2019

Measuring and Estimating the Effect Sizes of Copy Number Variants on General Intelligence in Community-Based Samples.

JAMA Psychiatry 2018 05;75(5):447-457

Department of Pediatrics, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Importance;: Copy number variants (CNVs) classified as pathogenic are identified in 10% to 15% of patients referred for neurodevelopmental disorders. However, their effect sizes on cognitive traits measured as a continuum remain mostly unknown because most of them are too rare to be studied individually using association studies.

Objective: To measure and estimate the effect sizes of recurrent and nonrecurrent CNVs on IQ.

Design, Setting, And Participants: This study identified all CNVs that were 50 kilobases (kb) or larger in 2 general population cohorts (the IMAGEN project and the Saguenay Youth Study) with measures of IQ. Linear regressions, including functional annotations of genes included in CNVs, were used to identify features to explain their association with IQ. Validation was performed using intraclass correlation that compared IQ estimated by the model with empirical data.

Main Outcomes And Measures: Performance IQ (PIQ), verbal IQ (VIQ), and frequency of de novo CNV events.

Results: The study included 2090 European adolescents from the IMAGEN study and 1983 children and parents from the Saguenay Youth Study. Of these, genotyping was performed on 1804 individuals from IMAGEN and 977 adolescents, 445 mothers, and 448 fathers (484 families) from the Saguenay Youth Study. We observed 4928 autosomal CNVs larger than 50 kb across both cohorts. For rare deletions, size, number of genes, and exons affect IQ, and each deleted gene is associated with a mean (SE) decrease in PIQ of 0.67 (0.19) points (P = 6 × 10-4); this is not so for rare duplications and frequent CNVs. Among 10 functional annotations, haploinsufficiency scores best explain the association of any deletions with PIQ with a mean (SE) decrease of 2.74 (0.68) points per unit of the probability of being loss-of-function intolerant (P = 8 × 10-5). Results are consistent across cohorts and unaffected by sensitivity analyses removing pathogenic CNVs. There is a 0.75 concordance (95% CI, 0.39-0.91) between the effect size on IQ estimated by our model and IQ loss calculated in previous studies of 15 recurrent CNVs. There is a close association between effect size on IQ and the frequency at which deletions occur de novo (odds ratio, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.84-0.87; P = 2.7 × 10-88). There is a 0.76 concordance (95% CI, 0.41-0.91) between de novo frequency estimated by the model and calculated using data from the DECIPHER database.

Conclusions And Relevance: Models trained on nonpathogenic deletions in the general population reliably estimate the effect size of pathogenic deletions and suggest omnigenic associations of haploinsufficiency with IQ. This represents a new framework to study variants too rare to perform individual association studies and can help estimate the cognitive effect of undocumented deletions in the neurodevelopmental clinic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2018.0039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5875373PMC
May 2018