Publications by authors named "Elisabetta Setola"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Complementary and alternative medicine in sarcoma patients treated in an Italian sarcoma center.

J Cancer Res Ther 2021 Apr-Jun;17(2):516-522

Statistical Service, IRCCS, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy.

Background: Bone and soft-tissue sarcoma are rare tumors. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is often used in cancer patients however limited data are available in sarcoma patients. The aim of the present study is to explore the use of CAM in patients with bone and soft-tissue sarcoma.

Methods: Patients in follow-up visit for high grade bone or soft-tissue sarcoma at the Rizzoli outpatient clinic from September 1, 2014, to December 31, 2015, were asked, after written consent, to fill out a questionnaire with items pertaining to sociodemographic factors and their use of CAM before, during, or after chemotherapy.

Results: Four hundred and sixty-nine participated to the survey: 409 were adults and 60 were <18 years old. The percentage of use of CAM in adults was 44.7% and in minors 38.3%. The most common type of CAM was vitamins and minerals, followed by phytotherapy and homeopathy. The majority of patients used CAM after the sarcoma diagnosis. None used CAM alone instead of conventional chemotherapy. Benefits from use of CAM were reported by 75% of patients (some benefit in 53% plus high benefit in others 22%) and side effects in 6.7%. A significant correlation was found with CAM use and female gender, young age (18-44) and higher education. Disclosure to the oncologist was 56% and 69% to their family doctors.

Conclusions: This study shows that CAM use is frequent among adults and pediatric patients with bone and soft tissue sarcoma as in other cancer patients. Moreover, the profile of these Italian CAM consumers in sarcoma patients is similar to other studies. Patients disclosure to their oncologist or physician about the use of CAM was similar to other Italian studies, but higher compared to other international studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_348_20DOI Listing
June 2021

Outcome in dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma for patients treated with multimodal therapy: Results from the EUROpean Bone Over 40 Sarcoma Study.

Eur J Cancer 2021 Jul 11;151:150-158. Epub 2021 May 11.

Department of Orthopaedics and Orthopaedic Oncology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.

Introduction: The role of chemotherapy for patients with dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma (DDCS) is still under discussion. Here, we present the outcome in patients with DDCS treated with intensive chemotherapy from the EUROpean Bone Over 40 Sarcoma Study.

Materials And Methods: The chemotherapy regimen included doxorubicin, ifosfamide and cisplatin. Postoperative methotrexate was added in case of poor histological response. Toxicity was graded based on the National Cancer Institute expanded common toxicity criteria, version 2.0, and survival was analysed using Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank tests and univariate Cox regression models.

Results: Fifty-seven patients with DDCS (localised, 34 [60%]; metastatic, 23 [40%]) aged 42-65 years were included. Surgical complete remission (SCR) was achieved in 36 (63%) patients. The median overall survival (OS) was 24 months (95% confidence interval, 22-25), and the 5-year OS was 39%. Patients with extremity localisation had a 5-year OS of 49% compared with 29% in patients with a central tumour (P = 0.08). Patients with localised disease had a 5-year OS of 46%, whereas patients with metastatic disease had a 5-year OS of 29% (P = 0.12). Patients in SCR had a 5-year OS of 49%, whereas patients not in SCR had a 5-year OS of 23% (P = 0.004). Chemotherapy toxicity was considerable but manageable. There was no treatment-related death, and 39 (70%) patients received ≥6 cycles of the planned nine chemotherapy cycles.

Conclusions: Adding intensive chemotherapy to surgery for treatment of DDCS is feasible and shows favourable survival data compared with previous reports. With the limitations of data from a non-controlled trial, we conclude that chemotherapy could be considered in the management of patients aged >40 years.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2021.04.017DOI Listing
July 2021

Trabectedin for Patients with Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Non-Interventional, Retrospective, Multicenter Study of the Italian Sarcoma Group.

Cancers (Basel) 2021 Mar 2;13(5). Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Chemotherapy Unit, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, 1 Via Pupilli, 40136 Bologna, Italy.

The Italian Sarcoma Group performed this retrospective analysis of patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma, pretreated with ≥1 anthracycline-based treatment, and treated with trabectedin every three weeks. Primary endpoint was to describe real-life use of trabectedin across Italy. Secondary endpoints included objective response rate (ORR) and safety. Overall, 512 patients from 20 Italian centers were evaluated. Leiomyosarcoma (37.7%)/liposarcoma (30.3%) were the most prevalent histological types (abbreviated as L-sarcoma). Patients received a median of four trabectedin cycles (range: 1-40), mostly as a second-line treatment (~60% of patients). The ORR was 13.7% superior ( < 0.0001) in patients with L-sarcoma compared with patients with non-L-sarcoma (16.6% vs. 9.0%). Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 5.1 months, whereas median overall survival (OS) was 21.6 months. Significantly better PFS and OS were observed in patients with L-sarcoma, those with objective responses and/or disease stabilization, treated in an early line and treated with reduced dose. Bone marrow toxicity (61.4%) and transaminase increases (21.9%) were the most common grade 3/4 adverse events. The results of this real-life study suggest that trabectedin is an active treatment, which is mostly given as a second-line treatment to patients with a good performance status and high-grade, metastatic L-sarcoma (clinical trial information: NCT02793050).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers13051053DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7958606PMC
March 2021

Pembrolizumab in advanced osteosarcoma: results of a single-arm, open-label, phase 2 trial.

Cancer Immunol Immunother 2021 Feb 12. Epub 2021 Feb 12.

IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy.

Aim: To evaluate the activity and safety of the PD-1 antibody pembrolizumab in adult patients with advanced osteosarcoma.

Material And Methods: The study was a single-arm, open-label, phase 2 trial in patients with unresectable, relapsed osteosarcoma. The primary endpoint was clinical benefit rate (CBR) at 18 weeks of treatment, defined as complete response, partial response, or stable disease using RECIST v1.1. The trial had a Simon´s two-stage design, and ≥ 3 of 12 patients with clinical benefit in stage 1 were required to proceed to stage 2. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT03013127. NanoString analysis was performed to explore tumor gene expression signatures and pathways.

Results: Twelve patients were enrolled and received study treatment. No patients had clinical benefit at 18 weeks of treatment, and patient enrollment was stopped after completion of stage 1. Estimated median progression-free survival was 1.7 months (95% CI 1.2-2.2). At time of data cut-off, 11 patients were deceased due to osteosarcoma. Median overall survival was 6.6 months (95% CI 3.8-9.3). No treatment-related deaths or drug-related grade 3 or 4 adverse events were observed. PD-L1 expression was positive in one of 11 evaluable tumor samples, and the positive sample was from a patient with a mixed treatment response.

Conclusion: In this phase 2 study in advanced osteosarcoma, pembrolizumab was well-tolerated but did not show clinically significant antitumor activity. Future trials with immunomodulatory agents in osteosarcoma should explore combination strategies in patients selected based on molecular profiles associated with response.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00262-021-02876-wDOI Listing
February 2021

High Dose Ifosfamide in Relapsed and Unresectable High-Grade Osteosarcoma Patients: A Retrospective Series.

Cells 2020 10 31;9(11). Epub 2020 Oct 31.

Chemotherapy Unit, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, 40136 Bologna, Italy.

: The evidence on high-dose ifosfamide (HD-IFO) use in patients with relapsed osteosarcoma is limited. We performed a retrospective study to analyze HD-IFO activity. : Patients with osteosarcoma relapsed after standard treatment [methotrexate, doxorubicin, cisplatin +/- ifosfamide (MAP+/-I)] with measurable disease according to RECIST1.1 were eligible to ifosfamide (3 g/m/day) continuous infusion (c.i.) days 1-5 q21d. RECIST1.1 overall response rate (ORR) (complete response (CR) + partial response (PR)), progression-free survival at 6-month (6m-PFS), duration of response (DOR), and 2-year overall survival (2y-OS) were assessed. PARP1 expression and gene mutations were tested by immunohistochemistry and next-generation sequencing. : 51 patients were included. ORR was 20% (1 CR + 9 PR). Median DOR was 5 months (95%CI 2-7). Median PFS, 6m-PFS, OS, and 2y-OS were 6 months (95%CI 4-9), 51%, 15 months (10-19), and 30%, respectively. A second surgical complete remission (CR2) was achieved in 26 (51%) patients. After multivariate analysis, previous use of ifosfamide (HR 2.007, = 0.034) and CR2 (HR 0.126, < 0.001) showed a significant correlation with PFS and OS, respectively. No significant correlation was found between outcomes and PARP1 or gene mutations. : HD-IFO should be considered as the standard first-line treatment option in relapsed osteosarcoma and control arm of future trial in this setting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cells9112389DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7692098PMC
October 2020

Angiosarcoma of bone: a retrospective study of the European Musculoskeletal Oncology Society (EMSOS).

Sci Rep 2020 07 2;10(1):10853. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy.

Angiosarcoma of bone (B-AS) is a rare malignant tumor of vascular origin. The aim of this retrospective study is to report on treatments and prognosis. Data were collected from the EMSOS website. 80 patients in 9 centers included: 51 male/29 female; median age 54 years (range 17 to 92); 56% with localized disease, 44% metastatic. Primary tumor surgery: 76% (30% amputation, 26% intralesional margins); radiotherapy (RT): 41%; chemotherapy (CT): 47% (56% in metastatic, 41% in localized cases). With a median follow-up of 31 months (range 40 to 309), 5-year overall survival (OS) was 27% (95%CI 16-30): 41% (95%CI 25-56) for localized patients, and 8% (95%CI 0-20) for metastatic (p = 0.002). In metastatic patients, 1 year OS was significantly influenced by chemotherapy response: 67% (95CI% 29-100) for those who responded or had stable disease (n = 7), and 18% (95CI% 0-41) for patients with progressive disease (n = 11), p 0.002. The surgical complete remission (SCR) status was pivotal in localized patients (5-year OS 45% for SCR, 17% no SCR, p = 0.03); also 5-year OS was significantly influenced by age and site of the tumor. After multivariate analysis, the addition of radiotherapy to surgery significantly influenced the disease-free survival (DFS) rate, whereas the use of chemotherapy lost the significance showed at the univariate analysis. Overall, patients with metastatic B-AS have a dismal prognosis, with a prolonged survival in case with a response to chemotherapy. Experimental trials with more active systemic treatment regimens are needed. In patients with localized disease, the patient's age and site of the tumor are prognostic factors and any effort must be made to achieve an SCR status. No definitive conclusions can be drawn from our data on the use of adjuvant chemotherapy, while the use of adjuvant radiotherapy might improve DSF in patients surgically free of disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-66579-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7331738PMC
July 2020

How Does the Skeletal Oncology Research Group Algorithm's Prediction of 5-year Survival in Patients with Chondrosarcoma Perform on International Validation?

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2020 Oct;478(10):2300-2308

M. E. R. Bongers, A. V. Karhade, O. Q. Groot, J. H. Schwab, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Division of Orthopaedic Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital - Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: The Skeletal Oncology Research Group (SORG) machine learning algorithm for predicting survival in patients with chondrosarcoma was developed using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. This algorithm was externally validated on a dataset of patients from the United States in an earlier study, where it demonstrated generally good performance but overestimated 5-year survival. In addition, this algorithm has not yet been validated in patients outside the United States; doing so would be important because external validation is necessary as algorithm performance may be misleading when applied in different populations.

Questions/purposes: Does the SORG algorithm retain validity in patients who underwent surgery for primary chondrosarcoma outside the United States, specifically in Italy?

Methods: A total of 737 patients were treated for chondrosarcoma between January 2000 and October 2014 at the Italian tertiary care center which was used for international validation. We excluded patients whose first surgical procedure was performed elsewhere (n = 25), patients who underwent nonsurgical treatment (n = 27), patients with a chondrosarcoma of the soft tissue or skull (n = 60), and patients with peripheral, periosteal, or mesenchymal chondrosarcoma (n = 161). Thus, 464 patients were ultimately included in this external validation study, as the earlier performed SEER study was used as the training set. Therefore, this study-unlike most of this type-does not have a training and validation set. Although the earlier study overestimated 5-year survival, we did not modify the algorithm in this report, as this is the first international validation and the prior performance in the single-institution validation study from the United States may have been driven by a small sample or non-generalizable patterns related to its single-center setting. Variables needed for the SORG algorithm were manually collected from electronic medical records. These included sex, age, histologic subtype, tumor grade, tumor size, tumor extension, and tumor location. By inputting these variables into the algorithm, we calculated the predicted probabilities of survival for each patient. The performance of the SORG algorithm was assessed in this study through discrimination (the ability of a model to distinguish between a binary outcome), calibration (the agreement of observed and predicted outcomes), overall performance (the accuracy of predictions), and decision curve analysis (establishment on the ability of a model to make a decision better than without using the model). For discrimination, the c-statistic (commonly known as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for binary classification) was calculated; this ranged from 0.5 (no better than chance) to 1.0 (excellent discrimination). The agreement between predicted and observed outcomes was visualized with a calibration plot, and the calibration slope and intercept were calculated. Perfect calibration results in a slope of 1 and an intercept of 0. For overall performance, the Brier score and the null-model Brier score were calculated. The Brier score ranges from 0 (perfect prediction) to 1 (poorest prediction). Appropriate interpretation of the Brier score requires comparison with the null-model Brier score. The null-model Brier score is the score for an algorithm that predicts a probability equal to the population prevalence of the outcome for every patient. A decision curve analysis was performed to compare the potential net benefit of the algorithm versus other means of decision support, such as treating all or none of the patients. There were several differences between this study and the earlier SEER study, and such differences are important because they help us to determine the performance of the algorithm in a group different from the initial study population. In this study from Italy, 5-year survival was different from the earlier SEER study (71% [319 of 450 patients] versus 76% [1131 of 1487 patients]; p = 0.03). There were more patients with dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma than in the earlier SEER study (25% [118 of 464 patients] versus 8.5% [131 of 1544 patients]; p < 0.001). In addition, in this study patients were older, tumor size was larger, and there were higher proportions of high-grade tumors than the earlier SEER study (age: 56 years [interquartile range {IQR} 42 to 67] versus 52 years [IQR 40 to 64]; p = 0.007; tumor size: 80 mm [IQR 50 to 120] versus 70 mm [IQR 42 to 105]; p < 0.001; tumor grade: 22% [104 of 464 had Grade 1], 42% [196 of 464 had Grade 2], and 35% [164 of 464 had Grade 3] versus 41% [592 of 1456 had Grade 1], 40% [588 of 1456 had Grade 2], and 19% [276 of 1456 had Grade 3]; p ≤ 0.001).

Results: Validation of the SORG algorithm in a primarily Italian population achieved a c-statistic of 0.86 (95% confidence interval 0.82 to 0.89), suggesting good-to-excellent discrimination. The calibration plot showed good agreement between the predicted probability and observed survival in the probability thresholds of 0.8 to 1.0. With predicted survival probabilities lower than 0.8, however, the SORG algorithm underestimated the observed proportion of patients with 5-year survival, reflected in the overall calibration intercept of 0.82 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.98) and calibration slope of 0.68 (95% CI 0.42 to 0.95). The Brier score for 5-year survival was 0.15, compared with a null-model Brier of 0.21. The algorithm showed a favorable decision curve analysis in the validation cohort.

Conclusions: The SORG algorithm to predict 5-year survival for patients with chondrosarcoma held good discriminative ability and overall performance on international external validation; however, it underestimated 5-year survival for patients with predicted probabilities from 0 to 0.8 because the calibration plot was not perfectly aligned for the observed outcomes, which resulted in a maximum underestimation of 20%. The differences may reflect the baseline differences noted between the two study populations. The overall performance of the algorithm supports the utility of the algorithm and validation presented here. The freely available digital application for the algorithm is available here: https://sorg-apps.shinyapps.io/extremitymetssurvival/.

Level Of Evidence: Level III, prognostic study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000001305DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7491905PMC
October 2020

Experience with eribulin in pretreated patients with advanced liposarcoma: a case series.

Future Oncol 2020 Jan 20;16(1s):25-32. Epub 2019 Dec 20.

Chemotherapy Unit, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy.

Systemic treatments for advanced soft tissue sarcoma are limited. Eribulin showed activity in metastatic soft tissue sarcoma, particularly liposarcomas. Data from six patients with advanced liposarcoma that received eribulin as third- or fourth-line therapy are presented herein. Eribulin treatment was well tolerated; no grade 3-4 toxicity or therapy delay was observed. Two patients had a partial response; four had a prolonged stable disease. The first case, with pre-existing chronic renal dysfunction, achieved a 6-month stable disease with dose-reduced eribulin. The second case became resectable after eribulin treatment, with a 6-month complete surgical remission. The third case obtained a 7-month stable disease with eribulin and stereotactic body radiotherapy. The last three cases were ≥65 years old, and two of them had objective response with eribulin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fon-2019-0599DOI Listing
January 2020

Is there a role for chemotherapy after local relapse in high-grade osteosarcoma?

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2019 08 6;66(8):e27792. Epub 2019 May 6.

Chemotherapy Unit, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy.

Background: High-grade bone osteosarcoma has a high relapse rate. The best treatment of local recurrence (LR) is under discussion. The aim of this study is to analyze LR patterns and factors prognostic for survival.

Methods: LR diagnostic modality (clinical or imaging), pattern of recurrence, and post-LR survival (PLRS) were assessed.

Results: Sixty-two patients were identified, with median age 21 years (range, 9-75 years), including 11 (18%) ≤15 years, 30 (48%) from 16 to 29 years; 21 (34%) were older. Patterns of relapse were LR only 58%, LR + distant metastases (DM) 42%. Seventy-nine percent of patients relapsed within 24 months, and diagnosis was clinical in 88%. LR treatment was surgery 85%, chemotherapy 55%, chemotherapy + surgery 45%. Surgical complete remission after LR (CR2) was achieved in 60% (LR 86%; LR + DM 23%). With a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 5-235 months), the five-year PLRS was 37%, significantly better for patients with longer LR-free interval (LRFI; ≤24 months 31% vs > 24 months 61.5%, P = 0.03), absence of DM (no DM 56% vs DM 11.5%, P = 0.0001), and achievement of CR2 (no CR2 0% vs CR2 58.5%, P = 0.0001). No difference was found according to age and chemotherapy (LR only: five-year PLRS: 53% without chemotherapy vs 58% with chemotherapy, P = 0.9; LR + DM: five-year PLRS: 25% without chemotherapy vs 9% with chemotherapy, P = 0.7).

Conclusions: Early relapse is detected by symptoms in 90% of cases and associated with worse outcome. The achievement of CR2, not age, is crucial for survival. For patients with LR only, better survival was demonstrated, as compared with DM, and no improvement with chemotherapy after surgery was found.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.27792DOI Listing
August 2019

Pazopanib in relapsed osteosarcoma patients: report on 15 cases.

Acta Oncol 2019 Jan 12;58(1):124-128. Epub 2018 Sep 12.

d Department of Oncology , Oslo University Hospital, The Norwegian Radium Hospital , Oslo , Norway.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0284186X.2018.1503714DOI Listing
January 2019

Eribulin in advanced liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma.

Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2017 08 28;17(8):717-723. Epub 2017 Jun 28.

b Sarcoma Unit , Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust , London , UK.

Introduction: The heterogeneity of soft tissue sarcomas (STS) presents a formidable management challenge. Consequently, one of the main research goals is to define specific tailored therapy for each histological subtype and to develop a more personalised approach to treatment. The standard first line chemotherapy for advanced STS is doxorubicin, with or without ifosfamide, however, a number of different drugs are emerging as active therapies beyond first-line. Areas covered: Eribulin has recently been approved for advanced liposarcoma, after an anthracycline-containing regimen, demonstrating an overall survival (OS) advantage in liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma in a randomised Phase III clinical trial. In this manuscript, an overview of the efficacy and safety of eribulin in STS is presented, highlighting different clinical outcomes between histological subtypes and comparing data with other effective drugs used in the treatment of sarcomas. The potential mechanisms of action of eribulin are also described, including its activity as potent microtubule-destabilizing anticancer agent, which has other antitumor biological effects. Expert commentary: Eribulin is highly effective in some STS populations and also has an acceptable toxicity profile. Further studies are required to better understand the precise mechanism of action of this agent and potential role in combination schedules.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14737140.2017.1344098DOI Listing
August 2017

Palliative Sedation in Patients With Cancer.

Cancer Control 2015 Oct;22(4):433-41

Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Meldola, Italy.

Background: Palliative sedation involves the use of sedative medication to relieve refractory symptoms in patients by reducing their level of consciousness. Although it is considered an acceptable clinical practice from most ethical points of view, palliative sedation is still a widely debated procedure and merits better understanding.

Methods: The relevant medical literature pertaining to palliative sedation was analyzed and reviewed from various technical, relational, and bioethical perspectives.

Results: Proportionate palliative sedation is considered to be the most clinically appropriate modality for performing palliative sedation. However, guidelines must be followed to ensure that it is performed correctly. Benzodiazepines represent the first therapeutic option and careful monitoring of dosages is essential to avoid oversedation or undersedation.

Conclusions: Proportionate palliative sedation is used to manage and relieve refractory symptoms in patients with cancer during their last days or hours of life. Evidence suggests that its use has no detrimental effect on survival. A different decision-making process is used to manage the withdrawal of hydration than the process used to determine whether proportionate palliative sedation is appropriate. Communication between patients, their relatives, and the health care staff is important during this medical intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/107327481502200409DOI Listing
October 2015

Generation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer patients for adoptive T-cell transfer.

J Cell Physiol 2015 Jul;230(7):1457-65

Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Science, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.

This study designs a strategy for an adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) protocol based on the ex-vivo selection of autologous peripheral blood-derived CD8-enriched T-cells, stimulated with dendritic cells (DCs) that had been pulsed with apoptotic tumor cells to generate cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) with anti-tumor activity. Seventy-eight colorectal cancer (CRC) patients were enrolled in this study. Tumor tissues and peripheral blood (PB) were obtained at surgery. Tissues were mechanically dissociated and cultured to obtain a primary tumor cell line from each patient. DCs were derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using magnetic positive selection of CD14+ monocytes. Anti-tumor CTLs were elicited in co-/micro-cultures using DCs as antigen-presenting cells, autologous apoptotic tumor cells as a source of antigens, and CD8+ T lymphocytes as effectors. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion was assessed by ELISpot assays to evaluate the activation of the CTLs against the autologous tumor cells. Primary tumor cell lines were obtained from 20 of 78 patients (25.6%). DCs were generated from 26 patients, and of them, corresponding tumor cell lines were derived from six patients. ELISpot results showed that significant IFN-γ secretion was detected after different numbers of stimulations for two patients, whereas weak secretion was observed for three patients. Despite difficulties due to contamination of several primary tumor cell lines with gut intestinal flora, the results suggest that the generation of tumor-specific CTLs is feasible from patients with CRC, and could be useful for supporting an ACT approach in CRC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcp.24886DOI Listing
July 2015

Evaluation of P-glycoprotein, HER-2/ErbB-2, p53, and Bcl-2 in primary tumor and metachronous lung metastases in patients with high-grade osteosarcoma.

Cancer 2004 May;100(9):1936-42

Chemotherapy Service, Department of Musculoskeletal Oncology, Istituti Ortopedici Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy.

Background: Investigation of the relation between primary tumor and metastatic disease is necessary for the identification of predictive factors for postrecurrence survival (PRS) in patients with recurrent osteosarcoma.

Methods: Cellular levels of P-glycoprotein, ErbB-2, p53, and Bcl-2 expression were evaluated in primary tumor biopsy and metachronous pulmonary metastasis specimens from 19 patients with high-grade osteosarcoma. Results were analyzed for differences between primary tumor and pulmonary metastases and for correlations between expression patterns and survival.

Results: Positive staining in lung metastases was noted in 68%, 53%, 32%, and 84% of patients for P-glycoprotein, ErbB-2, p53, and Bcl-2, respectively. These percentages were higher than those observed in primary tumor specimens for all genetic markers evaluated, with a significant difference in the percentage of patients with positive staining for P-glycoprotein (68% vs. 32%; P = 0.05) and a near-significant difference in the percentage of patients with positive staining for Bcl-2 (84% vs. 53%; P = 0.08). Patients with ErbB-2 expression in the primary tumor were more likely to have multiple metastases and shorter recurrence-free intervals compared with patients in whom ErbB-2 expression was not observed, whereas differences in P-glycoprotein, p53, and Bcl-2 expression were not related to differences in metastatic pattern. PRS was influenced by p53 expression levels in pulmonary metastases, with patients who had negative staining for p53 having a significantly better PRS rate relative to patients with positive staining for p53 (3-year PRS rate: p53-negative, 64%; p53-positive, 17%; P = 0.008).

Conclusions: In the current study of patients with high-grade osteosarcoma, most patients exhibited increased cellular expression of P-glycoprotein, ErbB-2, and Bcl-2 in recurrent pulmonary metastases compared with primary tumor. Further studies aimed at investigating the relation between altered p53 expression in lung metastases and postrecurrence survival are recommended.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.20151DOI Listing
May 2004

Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for osteosarcoma of the extremity: intensification of preoperative treatment does not increase the rate of good histologic response to the primary tumor or improve the final outcome.

J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2003 Nov;25(11):845-53

Chemotherapy, Department of Musculoskeletal Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzolo, Bologna, Italy.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the results in terms of histologic response to primary chemotherapy of two sequential studies in osteosarcoma patients preoperatively treated with methotrexate, doxorubicin, cisplatin, and ifosfamide, given at different doses.

Patients And Methods: Between January 1993 and March 1995, 171 patients with osteosarcoma of the extremity were treated according to a protocol of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with preoperative methotrexate, cisplatin, doxorubicin, and ifosfamide. From April 1995 to December 1999, 196 osteosarcoma patients were preoperatively treated with the same drugs at higher doses. Postoperatively, patients received the same treatment in both studies used, but poor responders (tumor necrosis <95%) had more cycles of treatment than good responders.

Results: Comparing the two chemotherapy regimens, there were no significant differences in terms of good histologic response to chemotherapy (69% vs. 62%), 5-year event-free survival (60% vs. 65%), 5-year overall survival (74% vs. 80%), and rate of local recurrence (6% vs. 4%). The 5-year event-free survival was significantly related to the serum level of alkaline phosphatase before treatment (77% for patients with normal values vs. 46% for patients with high values) and the degree of histologic response to preoperative chemotherapy (69% for good responders vs. 54% for poor responders).

Conclusions: Increasing the doses of preoperative chemotherapy does not improve the rate of good histologic response and survival in osteosarcoma of the extremity. The degree of necrosis induced by preoperative treatment probably reflects an innate sensitivity to chemotherapy, which is not altered by increasing drug doses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00043426-200311000-00006DOI Listing
November 2003

Bone marrow of a patient with acute non-lymphoblastic leukaemia associated with the t(1;7)(p11;p11) chromosomal translocation.

Haematologica 2002 Mar;87(3):EIM08

Molecular Biology Unit, Institute of Hematology and Medical Oncology Seràgnoli, University of Bologna, Via Massarenti, 9 - 40138 Bologna, Italy.

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March 2002