Publications by authors named "Elisabetta Mondo"

5 Publications

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Epidemiologic case investigation on the zoonotic transmission of Staphylococcus aureus infection from goat to veterinarians.

Zoonoses Public Health 2021 May 5. Epub 2021 May 5.

Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Staphylococcus aureus infection led to a case of goat abortion, and four veterinarians contracted S. aureus infection from the goat during and after the abortion. Three veterinarians assisted a doe during the dystocic delivery of a dead foetus. Seventy-two hours after the dystocia, which ended with the goat's death, the veterinarians who assisted during the kidding and the veterinarian who performed the necropsy showed the presence of multiple, isolated, painful pustules 1-5 mm in diameter located along their forearms and knees. S. aureus was isolated from the pustules of the veterinarians, the placenta and uterus of the goat, the organs (brain, thymus gland, abomasum, liver and spleen) of the foetus, the scrotum and eye swabs of the buck, and mammary pustules of another goat from the same herd. Histological analysis revealed purulent metritis and inflammation of the placental cotyledons. Additional investigations eliminated the chances of other infections. S. aureus isolates recovered from the veterinarians, goats, foetus and buck were sensitive to the tested anti-microbials and did not encode staphylococcal enterotoxin genes (sea, ser, sep, see, seg and sei). The isolates were closely related, as indicated by the results of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and comparative whole-genome sequencing analysis. The results of this study clearly support the hypothesis that an episode of professional zoonosis was caused by S. aureus infection during the abortion and also highlight the need for bacterial subtyping in epidemiological surveys.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/zph.12836DOI Listing
May 2021

First isolation of Klebsiella variicola from a horse pleural effusion.

BMC Vet Res 2021 Feb 12;17(1):75. Epub 2021 Feb 12.

Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, Via Tolara di Sopra 50, Bologna, 40064, Italy.

Background: Respiratory diseases are the second most common cause of illnesses in horses, their etiology can be viral, bacterial, immune-mediated, or mechanical (Racklyeft and Love DN, Aust Vet J 78:549-59, 2000; Austin et al., J Am Vet Med Assoc 207:325-328, 1995; Arroyo et al., J Vet Intern Med 31:894-900, 2017). Klebsiella variicola is a Gram-negative bacterium that was initially identified as an endophyte in soil and plants such as bananas, rice, sugar cane and maize but recent studies have identified this microorganism as an emerging pathogen in humans (Rodríguez-Medina et al., Emerg Microbes Infect 8:973-988, 2019; Fontana et al., J Clin Microbiol 57:e00825-18, 2019; Rosenblueth et al., Syst Appl Microbiol 27:27-35, 2004). This paper describes, for the first time to our knowledge, the isolation of K. variicola from pleural effusion in a male adult horse.

Case Presentation: 17-years Italian Saddle Horse with respiratory distress and fever was admitted to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna. At home, the patient had undergone antibiotic therapy without clinical improvement. Vital signs on admission revealed an increased respiratory rate, tachycardia, pyrexia and weight loss. The animal was submitted for collateral examination including thoracic radiology and ultrasound and thoracoscopy that showed bilateral pleural effusion associated with multifocal pulmonary atelectasis. During the thoracoscopic examination, that confirmed the presence of a seropurulent pleural effusion, a sample of pleural fluid was collected and Gram-negative bacteria were isolated and subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) that allowed the identification of K. variicola. The isolate was sensitive to amikacin, cefazolin, enrofloxacin, marbofloxacin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole;the horse was treated with Oxytetracycline and amikacin. Despite a general health improvement of the subject, the pleural effusion did not resolve after treatment.

Conclusions: This paper describes, for the first time, the isolation of K. variicola in a horse with respiratory disease. The misidentification between K. variicola and K. pneumoniae has caused unawareness about significant aspects of this bacterial species. In fact, even though in animals the role of this bacterium is not clear, in humans it has been recognized as an emerging pathogen. The use of new methods for bacterial identification will probably lead to the isolation of a greater number of strains which will have to be studied to acquire knowledge that will be useful to clarify the clinical importance and relevance of K. variicola also in animals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12917-021-02776-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7881548PMC
February 2021

Effect of production process and high-pressure processing on viability of in traditional Italian dry-cured .

Ital J Food Saf 2020 Aug 19;9(2):9133. Epub 2020 Aug 19.

Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Lombardia e dell'Emilia Romagna, Sede Territoriale di Bologna.

In this study the effect of the application of High Pressure Treatment (HPP) combined with four different manufacturing processes on the inactivation of Listeria innocua, used as a surrogate for L. monocytogenes, in artificially contaminated samples was evaluated in order to verify the most suitable strategy to meet the Listeria inactivation requirements needed for the exportation of dry-cured meat in the U.S. Fresh anatomical cuts intended for production were supplied by four different delicatessen factories located in Northern Italy. Raw meat underwent experimental contamination with using a mixture of 5 strains. Surface contamination of the fresh anatomical cuts was carried out by immersion into inoculum containing spp The conditions of the HPP treatment were: pressure 593 MPa, time 290 seconds, water treatment temperature 14°C. was enumerated on surface and deep samples post contamination, resting, ripening and HPP treatment. The results of this study show how the reduction of the microbial load on during the production process did not vary among three companies (P>0.05) ranging from 3.73 to 4.30 log CFU/g, while it was significantly different (P<0.01) for the fourth company (0.92 log CFU/g). HPP treatment resulted in a significant (P<0.01) deep decrease of count with values ranging between 1.63-3.54 log CFU/g with no significant differences between companies. Regarding superficial contamination, HPP treatment resulted significant (P<0.01) only in Coppa produced by two companies. The results highlight that there were processes less effective to inhibit the pathogen; in particular for company D an increase of L. innocua count was shown during processing and HPP alone cannot be able to in reaching the Listeria inactivation requirements needed for exportation of dry-cured meat in the U.S. According to the data reported in this paper, HPP treatment increases the ability of the manufacturing process of in reducing count with the objective of a lethality treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/ijfs.2020.9133DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7459741PMC
August 2020

Effect of production process and high-pressure processing on viability of in traditional Italian dry-cured .

Ital J Food Saf 2020 Aug 19;9(2):8445. Epub 2020 Aug 19.

Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Lombardia e dell'Emilia Romagna, Sede Territoriale di Bologna.

The aim of the study was to investigate the combined effect of the manufacturing process followed by HPP treatment on the inactivation of spp. in artificially contaminated samples, in order to verify the ability of the combined processes to achieve the objective of a 5-log reduction of spp. needed for exportation to the U.S. Fresh anatomical cuts intended for production were supplied by four different delicatessen factories located in Northern Italy. Raw meat underwent experimental contamination with spp. using a mixture of 3 strains. Surface contamination of the fresh anatomical cuts was carried out by immersion into inoculum containing spp The conditions of the HPP treatment were: pressure 593 MPa, time 290 seconds, water treatment temperature 14°C. Surface and deep samples were performed post contamination (T0), end of the cold phase (T1), end of process (Tend), and after HPP treatment (postHPP) and spp. Enumerated. The results of this study show a significant reduction of spp. all through the production process (P<0.01) for all companies, followed by an additional reduction of bacterial counts due to HPP treatment (P<0.01), both in superficial and deep contaminations (P<0.01). The superficial overall reduction resulted of 1.58 to 5.04 log CFU/g during the production process. HPP treatment resulted in a significant (P<0.01) superficial and deep decrease in spp. enumeration varying from 0.61 to 4.01 log and from 1.49 to 4.13 log. According to the data presented in this study, only the combined approach of manufacturing process followed by HPP treatment always led to a 5-log reduction of Salmonella spp. required by USDA/FSIS guidelines.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/ijfs.2020.8445DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7459750PMC
August 2020

Role of gut microbiota in dog and cat's health and diseases.

Open Vet J 2019 10 1;9(3):253-258. Epub 2019 Sep 1.

Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Mammalian gastrointestinal tract is colonized by a large number of microorganisms, known as gut microbiota, that play a key role in the physiological and pathological states. In particular, the gastrointestinal tract of dogs and cats harbors a complex and highly biodiverse microbial ecosystem. Recent studies see it involved in a wide range of life processes, including energy needs, metabolism, immunological activity, and neuro-behavioral development. This review focuses on the role of the microbiota on the health of pets and will discuss changes that occur in the disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ovj.v9i3.10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6794400PMC
October 2019