Publications by authors named "Elisabeth Dahlborg-Lyckhage"

20 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Theoretical Framework for Emancipatory Nursing With a Focus on Environment and Persons' Own and Shared Lifeworld.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2018 Oct/Dec;41(4):340-350

Faculty of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhattan, Sweden (Drs Dahlborg Lyckhage and Brink); Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Health Science Aalesund, NTNU, Norway (Drs Dahlborg Lyckhage and Lindahl); and Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Sweden (Dr Lindahl).

By giving a brief overview of the metaconcepts in nursing, with a focus on environment, we sketch a theoretical framework for an emancipatory perspective in nursing care practice. To meet the requirements of equality in care and treatment, we have in our theoretical framework added a critical lifeworld perspective to the antioppressive practice, to meet requirements of equity in health care encounter. The proposed model of emancipatory nursing goes from overall ideological structures to ontological aspects of the everyday world. Based on the model, nurses could identify what kind of theoretical critical knowledge and thinking they require to conduct equal care and encounter the person behind the patient role.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000227DOI Listing
October 2019

Norm-Critical Potential in Undergraduate Nursing Education Curricula: A Document Analysis.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2019 Apr/Jun;42(2):E24-E37

Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhattan, Sweden (Drs Tengelin, Berndtsson, and Dahlborg Lyckhage); School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden (Drs Tengelin and Bülow); and Department of Social Work, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa (Dr Bülow).

The documents and literature that regulate nursing education are based on certain values and knowledge, and the underlying power in the curriculum raises the question of how health care professionals are molded during the course of their education. Norm criticism is a concept with its roots in critical pedagogy and gender and queer studies, emphasizing the origins as well as the consequences of marginalization, power, and knowledge of what is generally accepted as "normal" and "true." Norm criticism is used in this article to analyze the documents and literature underlying a nursing program in Sweden, which are shown to include a sometimes politically correct rhetoric, but one lacking a firm basis in social justice values.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000228DOI Listing
June 2020

Discourses with potential to disrupt traditional nursing education: Nursing teachers' talk about norm-critical competence.

Nurs Inq 2017 01 5;24(1). Epub 2016 Nov 5.

Department of Health Sciences; University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.

This paper describes the discourses underlying nursing teachers' talk about their own norm-critical competence. Norm criticism is an approach that promotes awareness and criticism of the norms and power structures that exert an excluding effect in society in general and in the healthcare encounter in particular. Given the unequal relationships that can exist in healthcare, for example relationships shaped by racism, sexism and classism, a norm-critical approach to nursing education would help illuminate these matters. The studied empirical material consisted of focus group interviews. Nursing teachers discussed their norm-critical competence based on the university course "Norm-Aware Caring" in which they had recently participated. Through a critical discourse analysis, three discourses were identified in their talk, all of which had the potential to disrupt traditional, normative nursing education. However, in all three discourses there was an underlying discourse of normality, clearly positioning the teachers as exemplifying the "normal." The binary constructed between normality and otherness contradicts a basic tenet of the norm-critical approach and may hamper the development of genuine norm-critical competence in nursing education.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nin.12166DOI Listing
January 2017

"The Emperor's new clothes": discourse analysis on how the patient is constructed in the new Swedish Patient Act.

Nurs Inq 2017 04 29;24(2). Epub 2016 Sep 29.

Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.

The Swedish welfare debate increasingly focuses on market liberal notions and its healthcare perspective aims for more patient-centered care. This article examines the new Swedish Patient Act describing and analyzing how the patient is constructed in government documents. This study takes a Foucauldian discourse analysis approach following Willig's analysis guide. The act contains an entitlement discourse for patients and a requirement discourse for healthcare personnel. These two discourses are governed by a values-based healthcare discourse. Neo-liberal ideology, in the form of New Public Management discourse, focusing on the value of efficiency and competition, is given a hegemonic position as laws and regulations are used to strengthen it. The new Swedish Patient Act seems to further strengthen this development. The Act underlines the increased entitlement for patients, but it is not legally binding as it offers patients only indirect entitlement to influence and control their care. To safeguard the patient's entitlement under the Patient Act, healthcare personnel should be made aware of the contents of the Act, so that they can contribute to the creation of systems and working methods that facilitate respect of the Act's provisions in daily healthcare work.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nin.12162DOI Listing
April 2017

Registered Nurses' Patient Education in Everyday Primary Care Practice: Managers' Discourses.

Glob Qual Nurs Res 2015 Jan-Dec;2:2333393615599168. Epub 2015 Aug 16.

University of West, Trollhättan, Sweden.

Nurses' patient education is important for building patients' knowledge, understanding, and preparedness for self-management. The aim of this study was to explore the conditions for nurses' patient education work by focusing on managers' discourses about patient education provided by nurses. In 2012, data were derived from three focus group interviews with primary care managers. Critical discourse analysis was used to analyze the transcribed interviews. The discursive practice comprised a discourse order of economic, medical, organizational, and didactic discourses. The economic discourse was the predominant one to which the organization had to adjust. The medical discourse was self-evident and unquestioned. Managers reorganized patient education routines and structures, generally due to economic constraints. Nurses' pedagogical competence development was unclear, and practice-based experiences of patient education were considered very important, whereas theoretical pedagogical knowledge was considered less important. Managers' support for nurses' practical- and theoretical-based pedagogical competence development needs to be strengthened.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2333393615599168DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5342863PMC
August 2015

Perpetuating 'New Public Management' at the expense of nurses' patient education: a discourse analysis.

Nurs Inq 2015 Sep 18;22(3):190-201. Epub 2014 Oct 18.

University West Trollhättan, Trollhättan, Sweden.

This study aimed to explore the conditions for nurses' daily patient education work by focusing on managers' way of speaking about the patient education provided by nurses in hospital care. An explorative, qualitative design with a social constructionist perspective was used. Data were collected from three focus group interviews and analysed by means of critical discourse analysis. Discursive practice can be explained by the ideology of hegemony. Due to a heavy workload and lack of time, managers could 'see' neither their role as a supporter of the patient education provided by nurses, nor their role in the development of nurses' pedagogical competence. They used organisational, financial, medical and legal reasons for explaining their failure to support nurses' provision of patient education. The organisational discourse was an umbrella term for 'things' such as cost-effectiveness, which were prioritised over patient education. There is a need to remove managerial barriers to the professional development of nurses' patient education. Managers should be responsible for ensuring and overseeing that nurses have the prerequisites necessary for providing patient education as well as for enabling continuous reflective dialogue and opportunities for learning in practice.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nin.12085DOI Listing
September 2015

Fathers of Children With Type 1 Diabetes: Perceptions of a Father's Involvement From a Health Promotion Perspective.

J Fam Nurs 2014 Aug 19;20(3):337-354. Epub 2014 Jun 19.

Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden.

This study describes how fathers of children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes understand their involvement in their child's daily life from a health promotion perspective. Sixteen Swedish fathers of children living with type 1 diabetes were interviewed. Manifest and latent content analysis was used to identify two themes: the inner core of the father's general parental involvement and the additional involvement based on the child's diabetes. The former was underpinned by the fathers' prioritization of family life and the fathers being consciously involved in raising the child, and the latter by the fathers promoting and controlling the child's health and promoting and enabling the child's autonomy. The results highlight that the quality of the fathers' involvement is essential in the management of a child's chronic illness. It is important for pediatric diabetes health care professionals to assess the quality of fathers' involvement to promote the child's health.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1074840714539190DOI Listing
August 2014

Work-integrated learning: a didactic tool to develop praxis in nurse education.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2014 Jan-Mar;37(1):61-9

University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.

Praxis is a concept that is both vague and overused in nursing science. Hence, a more stringent use of the concept praxis could help clarify the connections between theory and practice. The purpose of this theoretical article was to highlight the advantages of developing praxis in nursing education. By using praxis as a dialectic concept, nurse educators can make significant contributions to clinical practice by clarifying that theory and practice are perceived as 2 sides of same coin, leading to a move from "being in praxis" to "being of praxis," a way to develop the profession's autonomy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000018DOI Listing
October 2014

Living in liminality--being simultaneously visible and invisible: caregivers' narratives of palliative care.

J Soc Work End Life Palliat Care 2013 ;9(4):272-88

a Department of Nursing , Health and Culture, University of West , Trollhättan , Sweden.

Palliative care is an integral part of care and takes place in many settings--including the home, special accommodations, and hospitals. However, research shows that palliative care often ends with a death in the hospital due to the heavy burden on the primary caregiver. This study explores the meaning of being the primary caregiver of a close one who is terminally ill and is based on qualitative interviews with six primary caregivers of a terminally ill individual at home. The findings are discussed in the light of the theoretical concepts of liminality, lived body, and power. A potential impending risk exists of being abandoned when one is the primary caregiver to a close one who is terminally ill. This situation calls for professional caregivers to take responsibility and to respond to these, often unspoken, needs. This is particularly important concerning bodily care and the medical treatment regimen. In addition, when friends and relatives are absent, there is an ethical demand on professional caregivers to compensate for this lack and to compensate for this need. Palliative home care demands care that is person-centered--including the individual's history, family and loved ones, and individual strengths and weaknesses.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15524256.2013.846885DOI Listing
September 2014

Changing essay writing in undergraduate nursing education through action research: a Swedish example.

Nurs Educ Perspect 2013 Jul-Aug;34(4):226-32

Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Health Studies, University of Stavanger, Norway.

Aim: This article describes the development of literature-based models for bachelor degree essays in Swedish undergraduate nursing education. Students' experiences in a course with literature-based models for bachelor degree essays are discussed.

Background: The ever-growing body of nursing research and specialized and complex health care practices make great demands on nursing education in terms of preparing students to be both skilled practitioners and users of research. Teaching to help students understand evidence-based practice is a challenge for nursing education.

Methods: Action research was used to generate knowledge of and practical solutions to problems in everyday locations.

Results: Six models were developed: concept analysis, contributing to evidence-based nursing by means of quantitative research, contributing to evidence-based nursing by means of qualitative research, discourse analysis, analysis of narratives, and literature review.

Conclusions: Action research was found to be a relevant procedure for changing ways of working with literature-based, bachelor degree essays. The models that were developed increased students' confidence in writing essays and preparedness for the nursing role.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5480/1536-5026-34.4.226DOI Listing
December 2013

'It's about me'--a narrative analysis of female smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and their relationship to smoking.

Scand J Caring Sci 2014 Jun 19;28(2):373-80. Epub 2013 Aug 19.

Närhälsan Mellerud, Mellerud, Sweden.

Background: Chronic obstructive lung disease is a disease that is common among the smoking population. In Sweden, more women than men are smokers. The most effective treatment to improve the symptoms of COPD is to quit smoking but still many women continue to smoke, despite their illness.

Aim: The aim of this study was to describe how a group of smoking women with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) experienced their everyday life and their relationship to smoking.

Method: A qualitative study based on narratives from six women with COPD was conducted. The narratives focused on the women's everyday life and their relationship to smoking. The interviews were analysed into four themes and a new story, based on these themes were constructed.

Findings: The new story describes a woman with COPD that knows what she must do but cannot find the power within herself to take action. She talks about herself like a young bird that is going fly for the first time.

Conclusion: The study indicates that these women need some form of individual help to find the inner strength that they lack. Their self-respect as well as their self-image needs to be boosted in order to strengthen their belief that they are going to cope without the cigarette.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/scs.12068DOI Listing
June 2014

Preoperative information provided to Swedish and immigrant patients before total hip replacement.

Med Arch 2012 ;66(6):399-404

Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Surgical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Background: Total hip replacement is an operation that usually leads to pain relief and improved health related quality of life (HRQoL). Previous studies have demonstrated the importance of information about upcoming surgery. Therefore, it was of interest to study how both immigrants, whose first language was not Swedish, and Swedish patients described pre-operative information.

Material And Methods: Individual interviews were conducted with 10 immigrants and 10 Swedish participants. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The study was carried out in western Sweden from March to November 2010.

Results: The findings revealed that pre-operative information for all patients undergoing elective total hip replacement was limited. Patients from both groups expressed concern about inadequate preoperative information pertaining to the surgery, implant selection, pain relief, choice of anaesthesia, no or too short a time to put questions to the surgeon and an overall stressful situation.

Conclusions: Adequate preoperative information is important for optimising pain relief and shortening the hospital stay. The fact that the patients overwhelmingly rated the preoperative information as inadequate may be due to several reasons. Mental distress and the two-week interval between the time when the patient received the information and the operation might have contributed to the low degree of retention.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5455/medarh.2012.66.399-404DOI Listing
August 2013

Fathers' encounter of support from paediatric diabetes teams; the tension between general recommendations and personal experience.

Health Soc Care Community 2013 May 28;21(3):263-70. Epub 2012 Nov 28.

University West, Division of Caring Sciences, Postgraduate Level, Trollhättan, Sweden.

The purpose of this grounded theory study was to explore and discuss how fathers involved in caring for a child with type 1 diabetes experienced support from Swedish paediatric diabetes teams (PDTs) in everyday life with their child. Eleven fathers of children with type 1 diabetes, living in Sweden and scoring high on involvement on the Parental Responsibility Questionnaire, participated. Data were collected from January 2011 to August 2011, initially through online focus group discussions in which 6 of 19 invited fathers participated. Due to high attrition, the data collection continued in eight individual interviews. A semi-structured interview guide was used, and the fathers were asked to share experiences of their PDT's support in everyday life with their child. A simultaneous and constant comparison approach to data collection and analysis allowed the core category to emerge: the tension between general recommendations and personal experience. This core category illuminates how the fathers experienced tension between managing their unique everyday life with their child and balancing this to meet their PDT's expectations with regard to blood glucose levels. The core category was supported by two categories: the tension between the fathers'and their PDT's knowledge, whereby fathers reported discrepancies between their PDT's medical knowledge and their own unique knowledge of their child; and the tension between the fathers'and their PDT's goals, whereby the fathers identified differences between the family's and their PDT's goals. As a dimension of the core category, fathers felt trust or distrust in their PDT. We conclude that to achieve high-quality support for children with diabetes and to enhance their health and well-being, involved fathers' knowledge of their unique family situation needs to be integrated into the diabetes treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hsc.12013DOI Listing
May 2013

Swedish pediatric diabetes teams' perception of fathers' involvement: A Grounded Theory study.

Nurs Health Sci 2013 Jun 20;15(2):179-85. Epub 2012 Nov 20.

Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden.

The purpose of this study was to analyze how Swedish pediatric diabetes teams perceived and discussed fathers' involvement in the care of their child with type 1 diabetes. It also aimed to discuss how the teams' attitudes towards the fathers' involvement developed during the data collection process. The Constructivist Grounded Theory design was used and data were collected during three repeated focus group discussions with three Swedish pediatric diabetes teams. The core category of the teams' perception of fathers' involvement emerged as: If dad attends, we are happy - if mom doesn't, we become concerned. Initially the teams balanced their perception of fathers' involvement on the mother's role as the primary caregiver. In connection with the teams' directed attention on fathers, in the focus group discussions, the teams' awareness of the importance of fathers increased. As a consequence, the team members began to encourage fathers' engagement in their child's care. We conclude that by increasing the teams' awareness of fathers as a health resource, an active health promotion perspective could be implemented in pediatric diabetes care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nhs.12011DOI Listing
June 2013

Lack of individualized perspective: a qualitative study of diabetes care for immigrants in Sweden.

Nurs Health Sci 2012 Jun 10;14(2):244-9. Epub 2012 Apr 10.

Institution of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

This study describes the care provided by a diabetes nurse specialist, and the care needs expressed by people with type 2 diabetes mellitus and an immigrant background. Clinical encounters between a diabetes nurse specialist and 10 people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus were observed and analyzed by means of qualitative content analysis. One theme, "the diabetes nurse specialist as the conductor of the visit", and four categories emerged from the findings, illustrating the power imbalance between the patients and the diabetes nurse specialist, as well as the lack of an individual perspective. Shifting from a medical perspective to one of openness towards the people's experiences provides a possibility for caregivers to empower patients suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus. The medical perspective seemed to steer the visit towards curative activities. Thus, technique-centered care should be developed by including individualized care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-2018.2012.00684.xDOI Listing
June 2012

Parents' discursive resources: analysis of discourses in Swedish, Danish and Norwegian health care guidelines for children with diabetes type 1.

Scand J Caring Sci 2012 Jun 10;26(2):363-71. Epub 2011 Nov 10.

University West, Trollhättan, Sweden Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden.

The incidence of diabetes type 1 in children, the most common metabolic disorder in childhood, increases worldwide, with highest incidence in Scandinavia. Having diabetes means demands in everyday life, and the outcome of the child's treatment highly depends on parents' engagement and involvement. The aim of this study was to explore and describe discourses in health care guidelines for children with diabetes type 1, in Sweden, Norway and Denmark during 2007-2010, with a focus on how parents were positioned. As method a Foucauldian approach to discourse analysis was applied, and a six-stage model was used to perform the analysis. The findings shows a Medical, a Pedagogic and a Public Health discourse embedded in the hegemonic Expert discourse. The Expert discourse positioned parents as dependent on expert knowledge, as recipients of education, as valuable and responsible for their child's health through practicing medical skills. This positioning may place parents on a continuum from being deprived of their own initiatives to being invited to take an active part and could result in feelings of guilt and uncertainty, but also of security and significance. From this study we conclude that guidelines rooted in the Expert discourse may reduce opportunities for parents' voices to be heard and may overlook their knowledge. By broadening the selection of authors of the guidelines to include patients and all professionals in the team, new discourses could emerge and the parents' voice might be more prominent.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-6712.2011.00942.xDOI Listing
June 2012

Diabetes empowerment related to Pender's Health Promotion Model: a meta-synthesis.

Nurs Health Sci 2010 Jun;12(2):259-67

Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Diabetes self-management is a challenge for both clients and health-care professionals. Empowerment plays a vital role in helping clients to achieve successful self-management. This study adopted a meta-ethnographic approach. Nine qualitative studies were synthesized in order to contribute to a deeper understanding of what clients perceive as being important in an effective empowerment strategy for diabetes self-management. Four central metaphors that influenced empowerment were identified: trust in nurses' competence and awareness, striving for control, a desire to share experiences, and nurses' attitudes and ability to personalize. The lines-of-argument synthesis suggested the need for an evaluation system to appraise clients' diabetes knowledge, health beliefs, and negative emotions, as well as the outcome of interventions. Based on Pender's Health Promotion Model, this study emphasizes the fact that health-care professionals need to understand and address modifiable behavior-specific variables. The study suggests that an effective empowerment strategy would be to use activity-related affect, as well as interpersonal and situational influences, as a means of facilitating and enhancing clients' health-promoting behaviors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-2018.2010.00517.xDOI Listing
June 2010

Predominant discourses in Swedish nursing.

Policy Polit Nurs Pract 2009 May;10(2):163-71

University College of West, Trollhättan, Sweden.

The aim of this study was to elucidate the predominant discourse in the field of Swedish nursing in 2000, 25 years after nursing was introduced as an academic discipline in Sweden. The method used was content analysis and deconstructive analysis of discourses. Laws, statutes, regulations, and examination requirements, including official reports, recruitment campaigns, and media coverage, were analyzed. The findings uncovered competing discourses striving to gain hegemony. In the public sector, official requirements competed against the media fixation on gender stereotypes and the realities of local recruitment campaigns. Media has a major role in disseminating prevailing conceptions and conventions pertaining to the nursing profession. As a result, decision makers, students, patients, and family members could get lower expectations of the professional competence of nursing practitioners than would otherwise have been the case in the absence of media exposure.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1527154409338493DOI Listing
May 2009

Competing discourses in palliative care.

Support Care Cancer 2010 May 12;18(5):573-82. Epub 2009 Jul 12.

Institute of Nursing, Health and Culture, University College West, SE-461 86 Trollhättan, Sweden.

Background: Palliative care focuses on early identification as well as prevention and alleviation of suffering. Previous studies have established that palliative care is a disciplinary area in a state of transformation due to the involvement of different professional categories and that nursing care in the palliative context is influenced by the dominance of the medical perspective.

Aim: This study aimed to describe palliative care from a nursing perspective prior to the implementation of a palliative care programme.

Patients And Methods: The approach was inspired by the ethnographic method and a constructionist perspective was used as a theoretical framework, as the focus was on existing palliative care discourses. Field studies were conducted on a ward where palliative care was provided to patients at the end of life. Approval for the study was granted by the Ethics Committee at Sahlgrenska Academy. Data were collected by means of participant field studies, informal deliberations and other relevant documents.

Main Results: Four different discourses were discerned: caring, non-caring, curing and the organisation.

Conclusions: The ethos on the ward was strongly linked to the medical discourse. We consider that a prerequisite for the organisation of palliative care is an expressed caring perspective based on the patients' experiences of suffering, which perspective is lacking in the curing and organisational discourses.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-009-0691-6DOI Listing
May 2010

The importance of awareness of nursing students' denotative images of nursing.

J Nurs Educ 2008 Dec;47(12):537-43

University West, SE-461 86, Trollhättan, Sweden.

The aim of this article is to describe the images that recent nursing students in Eurocentric culture have of nursing and discuss how these images can be used to highlight nurses' authority and autonomy in comparison with the medical profession. The empirical material consists of short narratives from 168 nursing students. Three themes emerged from the categories of answers: The Nurse as an Idealistic Helper, The Nurse as a Realistic Developer, and The Nurse as a Young Seeker. The essence of nursing could be traced in these themes even if a solid ground of nursing shows itself in changing forms. According to this study and previous research, nursing can be considered as a mummified occupation in its essence, given that the old values and stereotypes largely remain. The main motives for becoming a nurse are altruism, a desire for autonomy, and flexibility. To strengthen the profession, both teachers and clinical supervisors should use the students' images of nursing as a starting point in nursing education and develop them in different contexts.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/01484834-20081201-01DOI Listing
December 2008