Publications by authors named "Elina Isotalo"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Voice activity and participation profile in assessing the effects of voice disorders on quality of life: estimation of the validity, reliability and responsiveness of the Finnish version.

Folia Phoniatr Logop 2011 8;63(3):113-21. Epub 2010 Oct 8.

Eye, Ear and Oral Diseases, Department of Phoniatrics in Tampere University Hospital, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.

Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity, reliability and responsiveness of the Finnish version of the Voice Activity and Participation Profile (VAPP), a self-assessment questionnaire to measure psychosocial limitations caused by voice disorders.

Methods: The study was conducted in Tampere University Hospital in 2004 and 2005. Voice patients (n = 142) with diverse chronic voice pathologies received 3-5 sessions of voice therapy. Controls were known individuals with healthy voices (n = 127). The VAPP form was completed before attending hospital, at the first visit to hospital and before and after voice therapy.

Results: When comparing patients with healthy controls significant differences were found in score means. After brief voice therapy, the VAPP values improved moderately as 60% of patients had effect size of 0.27 or over. Physicians' advice did not improve VAPP scores. The VAPP question profile was regarded as consistent. Cronbach's alpha for the question profile was 0.958 and for the subsections 0.865.

Conclusions: VAPP appeared to be valid and responsive to the intervention. In test-retest reliability, although intraclass correlation was high (0.905), there was a trend for the second answers to be better than the first. Some proposals are given to improve the practicality of the VAPP form.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000316311DOI Listing
August 2011

SPEEDY babies: A putative new behavioral syndrome of unbalanced motor-speech development.

Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat 2008 Dec;4(6):1225-33

Deparment of Otorhinolaryngology, Phoniatric Division, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Haartmaninkatu 4 E, FI-00029 HUS, Helsinki, Finland.

Even though difficulties in motor development in children with speech and language disorders are widely known, hardly any attention is paid to the association between atypically rapidly occurring unassisted walking and delayed speech development. The four children described here presented with a developmental behavioral triad: 1) atypically speedy motor development, 2) impaired expressive speech, and 3) tongue carriage dysfunction resulting in related misarticulations. Those characteristics might be phenotypically or genetically clustered. These children didn't have impaired cognition, neurological or mental disease, defective sense organs, craniofacial dysmorphology or susceptibility to upper respiratory infections, particularly recurrent otitis media. Attention should be paid on discordant and unbalanced achievement of developmental milestones. Present children are termed SPEEDY babies, where SPEEDY refers to rapid independent walking, SPEE and DY to dyspractic or dysfunctional speech development and lingual dysfunction resulting in linguoalveolar misarticulations. SPEEDY babies require health care that recognizes and respects their motor skills and supports their needs for motor activities and on the other hand include treatment for impaired speech. The parents may need advice and support with these children.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2646651PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/ndt.s2640DOI Listing
December 2008

Somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields in examining lip area in speech-disordered children.

J Craniofac Surg 2008 Sep;19(5):1215-20

BioMag Laboratory, Helsinki University Central Hospital, HUSLAB, Helsinki, Finland.

Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a modern neurophysiological method to study brain activation after sensory stimulation. We aimed at determining the feasibility of MEG and somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) in assessing the lip area in speech-disordered children undergoing oral plate therapy (OPTH) to improve their articulation. Seven subjects (age range, 6-11 years) participated in the study. The speech was perceptually assessed, and the SEFs to tactile stimulation of the lip area were recorded before and after OPTH. Two patients did not attend the posttreatment MEG recording. Clinical perceptual analysis showed remarkable improvement of speech of the studied children after OPTH. Somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields were successfully recorded in 4 of these children, but no constant changes in the responses were found after the therapy.With this small number of patients, the possible modifications in the functioning of the cortical somatosensory area of the lip after OPTH remained undetected. The present method is, however, technically applicable in studying cortical responses to lip stimulation in speech-disordered children. Further studies using stimulation inside the mouth may provide more insight to the cortical effects of OPTH.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0b013e31818433ffDOI Listing
September 2008

Oculomotor findings mimicking a cerebellar disorder and postural control in severe Meniere's disease.

Auris Nasus Larynx 2009 Feb 22;36(1):36-41. Epub 2008 May 22.

Department of ENT, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Haartmaninkatu 4 E, FI-00029 HUS, Helsinki, Finland.

Objective: We explored whether vestibular derangement in patients with severe Meniere's disease is related to gaze and fixation difficulties and could explain complains of visual blurring and visual neglect.

Methods: Twenty-six patients with severe Meniere's disease treated with intratympanically applied gentamicin of the affected ear were examined. Saccades (with pseudo-random timing, size and side of the step) and pursuit eye movements (PEMs; pseudo-random target trajectory made of a combination of two sinusoidal waves of different frequencies) and posturography were tested in patients. For normative data of voluntary eye movements, 45 control subjects were tested, and for posturography 29 control subjects. Severity of symptoms in Meniere patients was assessed according to the total handicap score of AAO-HNSF (1985).

Results: Saccadic eye movements and postural stability were severely deteriorated in Meniere patients, and these disturbances correlated significantly with each other. Most of PEM parameters were significantly worse in Meniere patients than in control subjects. Prolongation of saccadic latency and reduced gains due to saccadization in PEMs were characteristic features for Meniere's patients. Severity of symptoms in Meniere patients correlated with prolongation of latency in saccades and with poorer gains in PEMs. Postural instability measured with posturography correlated with saccadic latency and PEMs.

Conclusion: In severe Meniere's disease, programming of oculomotor and postural responses show the same pattern of disturbance, an increased delay of processing and inaccuracy in the motor output. A fluctuant vestibular lesion with advanced severity can cause disorders of voluntary eye movements that are reflected with clinical complaints of difficulties in reading and visual scanning of surrounding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anl.2008.03.010DOI Listing
February 2009

Speech in 6 year old children with sub-mucous cleft palate.

J Craniofac Surg 2007 Jul;18(4):717-22; discussion 723-24

Eye, Ear and Oral Diseases, Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Phoniatrics in Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.

Speech in 83 children (in total) with sub-mucous cleft palate was evaluated at the age of 6 years. Velopharyngeal insufficiency was graded on the basis of perceptual assessment, taking into account the co-existence of various velopharyngeal insufficiency characteristics in speech. Out of 56 patients operated with a velopharyngeal flap to eliminate velo-pharyngeal insufficiency, 42 of them (75%) achieved normal velopharyngeal function in speech. Dento-alveolar misarticulations were found in 35% of the children. Misar-ticulations occurred independently of velopharyngeal insufficiency.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/scs.0b013e3181468cc9DOI Listing
July 2007

Changes in articulatory proficiency following microvascular reconstruction in oral or oropharyngeal cancer.

Oral Oncol 2006 Jul 20;42(6):646-52. Epub 2006 Feb 20.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Haartmaninkatu 4E, P.O. Box 220, FI-00029 HUS, Helsinki, Finland.

Articulatory proficiency of /r/ and /s/ sounds, voice quality and resonance, speech intelligibility, and intraoral sensation were examined prospectively before operation, and at four time points during a 1-year follow-up after microvascular transfer. Forty-one patients with a large oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma undergoing tumor resection and free-flap reconstruction usually combined with radiotherapy participated in the study. Articulation, voice, and resonance were investigated both live and from recorded speech samples by two trained linguistic examiners. The patients completed a self-rating of their speech intelligibility and were assessed for anterior intraoral surface sensation by means of 2-point moving discrimination. Misarticulations of /r/ and /s/ increased significantly after the therapy. Voice quality and resonance remained essentially normal. Speech intelligibility deteriorated significantly. Intraoral sensation decreased postoperatively but was not related to speech outcome. Sensate flaps did not prove to be superior in relation to speech tasks. A multidisciplinary approach is advocated in assessment of speech outcome after cancer surgery. Speech therapy is strongly recommended, even in the absence of a gross articulatory handicap.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oraloncology.2005.11.004DOI Listing
July 2006

Swallowing after free-flap reconstruction in patients with oral and pharyngeal cancer.

Oral Oncol 2006 May 20;42(5):501-9. Epub 2005 Dec 20.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.

Swallowing and intraoral sensation outcome were investigated prospectively after microvascular free-flap reconstruction. Forty-one patients with a large oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma underwent free-flap surgery usually combined with radiotherapy. The patients completed modified barium swallow, self-rating of swallowing, and 2-point moving discrimination preoperatively and at four time points during the 12-month follow-up period, and a plain chest X-ray one year after operation. Swallowing was impaired with respect to an objective and subjective measure after therapy. Rates for nonsilent and silent aspiration increased during the follow-up. Intraoral sensation deteriorated. Swallowing outcome was not related to sensation. One year after surgery, 86% of the patients ate regular masticated or soft food. Microvascular transfers offer a reasonable option for oral reconstruction. This study does not support the need for sensate flaps. Swallowing problems should be routinely sought and patients rehabilitated during a sufficiently long follow-up with videofluorography regardless of the patient's perception of swallowing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oraloncology.2005.10.007DOI Listing
May 2006

Speech aerodynamics and nasalance in oral cancer patients treated with microvascular transfers.

J Craniofac Surg 2005 Nov;16(6):990-5; discussion 996

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.

The purpose of the current study was to assess speech aerodynamics and nasal acoustic energy during a follow-up period of 12 months in patients having undergone microvascular free flap reconstruction after tumor ablation from the oral cavity or oropharynx, usually followed by radiotherapy. Velopharyngeal function was assessed in terms of velopharyngeal orifice size by a pressure-flow measurement technique as well as by determining the instrumental correlate of perceived nasality (i.e., nasalance) during speech production. Velopharyngeal closure and nasalance were estimated to be adequate before operation both in oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer patients. After the operation, at the group level, the oral cavity patients showed adequate velopharyngeal closure and nasalance. In contrast, the postoperative velopharynx orifice size was significantly bigger in the oropharyngeal cancer patients as compared with the oral cavity patients 6 months after operation. However, based on average aerodynamic as well as the nasalance data, the impairment of velopharyngeal function was not regarded clinically significant at the group level in either group of patients. The present treatment protocol served to maintain the prerequisites for normal or close to normal speech physiology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.scs.0000179753.14037.7aDOI Listing
November 2005

Association between school performance, breast milk intake and fatty acid profile of serum lipids in ten-year-old cleft children.

J Craniofac Surg 2005 Sep;16(5):764-9

Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland.

The fatty acid profiles of serum lipids were examined in 53 ten-year-old cleft children. The children presented with different cleft types (cleft lip, cleft lip and palate, isolated cleft palate and submucuous cleft palate) and were recruited from the Finnish Cleft Center. We also studied associations between serum lipid fatty acids and early breast milk intake, cognitive development in terms of preschool language learning and school achievement. The fatty acid profiles of serum lipids did not differ between boys and girls. The proportion of myristic acid in serum cholesteryl esters (CE) was higher and proportion of nervonic acid in phospholipids (PL) lower in children with isolated palatal clefts than in those with submucuous clefts. Out of the present children, 30% and 60% received breast milk less than 1 or 3 months, respectively. The proportions of docosahexaenoic acid in CE and in PL were significantly higher in the children whose breast milk intake was longer than 3 months. The number of children requiring special education was higher among those who received breast milk less than 1 month than among those with longer breast milk intake. In conclusion, the fatty acid profiles of serum lipids seem to be comparable among children with different cleft types. Short breast milk intake was associated with poorer school performance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.scs.0000168758.02040.98DOI Listing
September 2005

Monocular versus binocular vision in postural control.

Auris Nasus Larynx 2004 Mar;31(1):11-7

LPPA, Collège de France CNRS, 11 place Marcelin Berthelot, 4 F-75005 Paris, France.

Objective: In previous studies about the control of posture there have been controversial findings. Our aim was to examine the role of monocular and binocular vision in controlling posture in quiet stance.

Methods: Twenty-eight normal subjects were tested. We used a force platform in measuring postural stability. In main experiment, postural stability was measured in four conditions: both eyes open (BEO), dominant eye open (DEO) non-dominant eye open (NDEO), and both eyes closed (BEC). In a further experiment, 11 subjects were tested in conditions where a vertical prism was placed in front of dominant eye. Prism was strong enough to cause diplopia. Our interest was to see, if diplopia affected the balance.

Results: In main experiment, at level of group the body-sway in any of the three ocular (viewing) conditions did not differ from each other. At level of individuals, binocular vision was more effective on controlling posture in only half of subjects. In prism experiment, relative to normal binocular viewing the postural stability was modified in both prism conditions, but there was no difference between monocular and binocular viewing with prism.

Conclusion: In quiet stance and in subjects with perfect binocular vision and stereopsis, the benefit out of binocular viewing in postural stability is subject-dependent. At the level of group, monocular vision provides equally good postural stability as binocular vision.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anl.2003.10.001DOI Listing
March 2004