Publications by authors named "Elijah Douglass"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Epicardial Fat: Pathophysiology and Clinical Significance.

Cardiol Rev 2017 Sep/Oct;25(5):230-235

From the *Department of Medicine, Weill-Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY; †Department of Internal Medicine, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA; and ‡Department of Medicine, Westchester Medical Center, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY.

Over the last decade and a half there has been much interest in understanding the role of epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) in cardiac pathology. EAT is a visceral adipose deposit with putative paracrine function. In the nondiseased state, EAT releases cardioprotective cytokines and chemokines to the coronary vasculature. In pathological states, EAT releases an inflammatory cytokine profile that is believed to contribute to the development and progression of coronary artery disease (CAD). EAT imaging with echocardiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated a correlation between EAT size and CAD. Small interventional studies have found evidence that the pathological state of EAT is at least somewhat reversible. The relationship between EAT size and the development and/or progression of CAD may present future clinicians with a new tool for risk assessment and intervention response monitoring. In this article we review current basic science and clinical research, comment on the role of EAT imaging in the management of patients at risk for CAD, and suggest areas for future investigation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CRD.0000000000000153DOI Listing
June 2017

So Many Possibilities: Lung Nodules in a Transplant Recipient.

Am J Med 2017 May 10;130(5):534-536. Epub 2017 Jan 10.

Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell University/New York Presbyterian Hospital; Division of Infectious Disease, Weill Cornell University/New York Presbyterian Hospital.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2016.12.013DOI Listing
May 2017

Identification of ovarian cancer metastatic miRNAs.

PLoS One 2013 12;8(3):e58226. Epub 2013 Mar 12.

Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.

Serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients often succumb to aggressive metastatic disease, yet little is known about the behavior and genetics of ovarian cancer metastasis. Here, we aim to understand how omental metastases differ from primary tumors and how these differences may influence chemotherapy. We analyzed the miRNA expression profiles of primary EOC tumors and their respective omental metastases from 9 patients using miRNA Taqman qPCR arrays. We find 17 miRNAs with differential expression in omental lesions compared to primary tumors. miR-21, miR-150, and miR-146a have low expression in most primary tumors with significantly increased expression in omental lesions, with concomitant decreased expression of predicted mRNA targets based on mRNA expression. We find that miR-150 and miR-146a mediate spheroid size. Both miR-146a and miR-150 increase the number of residual surviving cells by 2-4 fold when challenged with lethal cisplatin concentrations. These observations suggest that at least two of the miRNAs, miR-146a and miR-150, up-regulated in omental lesions, stimulate survival and increase drug tolerance. Our observations suggest that cancer cells in omental tumors express key miRNAs differently than primary tumors, and that at least some of these microRNAs may be critical regulators of the emergence of drug resistant disease.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0058226PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3595263PMC
September 2013

Roles of mouse sperm-associated alpha-L-fucosidases in fertilization.

Mol Reprod Dev 2013 Apr 14;80(4):273-85. Epub 2013 Mar 14.

Department of Biological Sciences, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015, USA.

Sperm-associated α-L-fucosidases have been implicated in fertilization in many species. Previously, we documented the existence of α-L-fucosidase in mouse cauda epididymal contents, and showed that sperm-associated α-L-fucosidase is cryptically stored within the acrosome and reappears within the sperm equatorial segment after the acrosome reaction. The enrichment of sperm membrane-associated α-L-fucosidase within the equatorial segment of acrosome-reacted cells implicates its roles during fertilization. Here, we document the absence of α-L-fucosidase in mouse oocytes and early embryos, and define roles of sperm associated α-L-fucosidase in fertilization using specific inhibitors and competitors. Mouse sperm were pretreated with deoxyfuconojirimycin (DFJ, an inhibitor of α-L-fucosidase) or with anti-fucosidase antibody; alternatively, mouse oocytes were pretreated with purified human liver α-L-fucosidase. Five-millimolar DFJ did not inhibit sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) binding, membrane binding, or fusion and penetration, but anti-fucosidase antibody and purified human liver α-L-fucosidase significantly decreased the frequency of these events. To evaluate sperm-associated α-L-fucosidase enzyme activity in post-fusion events, DFJ-pretreated sperm were microinjected into oocytes, and 2-pronuclear (2-PN) embryos were treated with 5 mM DFJ with no significant effects, suggesting that α-L-fucosidase enzyme activity does not play a role in post-fusion events and/or early embryo development in mice. The recognition and binding of mouse sperm to the ZP and oolemma involves the glycoprotein structure of α-L-fucosidase, but not its catalytic action. These observations suggest that deficits in fucosidase protein and/or the presence of anti-fucosidase antibody may be responsible for some types of infertility.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mrd.22164DOI Listing
April 2013