Publications by authors named "Eliana Hurwich-Reiss"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Improving Caregiver Self-Efficacy and Children's Behavioral Outcomes via a Brief Strength-Based Video Coaching Intervention: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

Prev Sci 2021 May 7. Epub 2021 May 7.

Department of Psychology and Center for Translational Neuroscience, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, USA.

Many existing preventive intervention programs focus on promoting responsive parenting practices. However, these parenting programs are often long in duration and expensive, and meta-analytic evidence indicates that families facing high levels of adversity typically benefit less. Moreover, due to a lack of specification and evaluation of conceptual models, the mechanisms underlying program-related changes in caregivers and their children often remain unclear. The current study aimed to test the effectiveness of a video feedback parenting intervention program, Filming Interactions to Nurture Development (FIND), in improving caregivers' self-efficacy and reducing children's behavioral problems. Data derived from a randomized controlled trial using pretest-posttest design with low-income families reporting high levels of stress (N = 91, children aged 4 to 36 months old, 41.8% female). Families were randomly assigned to an active control or FIND intervention group. Results indicated that caregivers in the FIND group exhibited significant improvement in self-report sense of parenting competence and self-efficacy in teaching tasks. These program impacts were particularly pronounced among caregivers who experience high levels of childhood adversity. Findings provide preliminary support for the FIND conceptual model. Specifically, caregivers' improved self-efficacy in teaching tasks was linked to children's reduced internalizing and externalizing problems (notably, direct FIND intervention effects on children's behavioral outcomes were not observed). Overall, results support the effectiveness of FIND in enhancing caregivers' sense of parenting competence and potentially promoting optimal child development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-021-01251-6DOI Listing
May 2021

Characterizing therapist delivery of evidence-based intervention strategies in publicly funded mental health services for children with autism spectrum disorder: Differentiating practice patterns in usual care and AIM HI delivery.

Autism 2021 Mar 28:13623613211001614. Epub 2021 Mar 28.

Child and Adolescent Services Research Center, University of California, San Diego, USA.

Lay Abstract: This study was conducted to identify patterns of therapist delivery of evidence-based intervention strategies with children with autism spectrum disorder receiving publicly funded mental health services and compare strategy use for therapists delivering usual care to those trained to deliver AIM HI ("An Individualized Mental Health Intervention for ASD"), an intervention designed to reduce challenging behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorder. For therapists trained in AIM HI, intervention strategies grouped onto two factors, and , while strategies used by usual care therapists grouped onto a broader single factor, . Among usual care therapists, were related to an increase in child behavior problems, whereas for AIM HI therapists, were related with reductions in child behavior problems over 18 months. Findings support the use of active teaching strategies in reducing challenging behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorder and provide support for the effectiveness of training therapists in evidence-based interventions to promote the delivery of targeted, specific intervention strategies to children with autism spectrum disorder in mental health services.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/13623613211001614DOI Listing
March 2021

Parental buffering in the context of poverty: positive parenting behaviors differentiate young children's stress reactivity profiles.

Dev Psychopathol 2020 12;32(5):1778-1787

Department of Psychology, University of Denver, CO, USA.

Experiencing poverty increases vulnerability for dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning and compromises long-term health. Positive parenting buffers children from HPA axis reactivity, yet this has primarily been documented among families not experiencing poverty. We tested the theorized power of positive parenting in 124 parent-child dyads recruited from Early Head Start (Mage = 25.21 months) by examining child cortisol trajectories using five samples collected across a standardized stress paradigm. Piecewise latent growth models revealed that positive parenting buffered children's stress responses when controlling for time of day, last stress task completed, and demographics. Positive parenting also interacted with income such that positive parenting was especially protective for cortisol reactivity in families experiencing greater poverty. Findings suggest that positive parenting behaviors are important for protecting children in families experiencing low income from heightened or prolonged physiologic stress reactivity to an acute stressor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579420001224DOI Listing
December 2020

Using stakeholder perspectives to guide systematic adaptation of an autism mental health intervention for Latinx families: A qualitative study.

J Community Psychol 2020 05 9;48(4):1194-1214. Epub 2019 Dec 9.

Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California.

Embedded within a Hybrid Type 1 randomized effectiveness-implementation trial in publicly funded mental health services, the current study identified stakeholder recommendations to inform cultural adaptations to An Individualized Mental Health Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder (AIM HI) for Latinx and Spanish-speaking families. Recommendations were collected through focus groups with therapists (n = 17) and semi-structured interviews with Latinx parents (n = 29). Relevant themes were identified through a rapid assessment analysis process and thematic coding of interviews. Adaptations were classified according to the Framework for Reporting Adaptations and Modifications-Enhanced (FRAME) to facilitate fit, acceptability, and sustained implementation of AIM HI and classify the content, nature, and goals of the adaptations. Recommended adaptations were classified through FRAME as tailoring training and intervention materials, changing packaging or materials, extending intervention pacing, and integrating supplemental training strategies. Goals for adaptations included improving fit for stakeholders, increasing parent engagement, and enhancing intervention effectiveness. The current study illustrates the process of embedding an iterative process of intervention adaptation within a hybrid effectiveness-implementation trial. The next steps in this study are to integrate findings with implementation process data from the parent trial to develop a cultural enhancement to AIM HI and test the enhancement in a Hybrid Type 3 implementation-effectiveness trial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcop.22296DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7261618PMC
May 2020

Family processes among Latino Early Head Start families: Understanding the role of caregiver acculturation.

J Community Psychol 2019 07 8;47(6):1433-1448. Epub 2019 May 8.

Department of Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado.

The Family Stress Model (FSM) provides a framework for how economic pressure can impact family processes and outcomes, including parent's mental health, parenting, and child problem behaviors. Although the FSM has been widely replicated, samples disproportionately impacted by poverty, including early childhood samples and in particular Latino families with young children, have been largely excluded from FSM research. Therefore, among a sample of Latino Early Head Start children (N = 127), the current study evaluated a modified FSM to understand the direct and indirect pathways among economic pressure, parental depression, parenting self-efficacy, the parent-child relationship, child problem behaviors, and parental acculturation. Results showed that the majority of the direct FSM pathways were well-replicated among Latino caregivers of young children. Further analyses illuminated how some pathways were replicated among more but not among less-acculturated Latino parents. Implications for future FSM research with Latino families as well as for parent-focused interventions are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcop.22198DOI Listing
July 2019

The effects of economic and sociocultural stressors on the well-being of children of Latino immigrants living in poverty.

Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol 2017 01;23(1):15-26

Department of Psychology, University of Denver.

Objective: This article explored whether preschoolers' physical (body mass index [BMI] and salivary cortisol levels) and psychological (internalizing/externalizing behaviors) well-being were predicted by economic hardship, as has been previously documented, and further, whether parental immigration-related stress and/or acculturation level moderated this relationship in low-income Latino families.

Method: The sample for the current study included 71 children of Latino immigrants (M = 4.46 years, SD = .62). Parents completed questionnaires assessing immigration-related stress, acculturation level, economic hardship, and child internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Child's BMI was also calculated from height and weight. Salivary cortisol samples were collected midmorning and midafternoon at home on non-child-care days. Salivary cortisol values were averaged and log transformed.

Results: Children's salivary cortisol was predicted by an interaction between economic hardship and acculturation, with lower cortisol values except when children were protected by both lower acculturation and lower economic hardship. Both internalizing and externalizing behaviors were predicted by an interaction between economic hardship and immigration-related stress, with highest behaviors among children whose parents reported high levels of both economic hardship and immigration-related stress.

Conclusions: The effects of economic hardship on the well-being of young children of Latino immigrants may depend on concurrent experiences of sociocultural stress, with detrimental effects emerging for these outcomes only when economic hardship and sociocultural stressors are high. (PsycINFO Database Record
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cdp0000111DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5338689PMC
January 2017

Unlocking the Black Box: A Multilevel Analysis of Preadolescent Children's Coping.

J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol 2018 Jul-Aug;47(4):527-541. Epub 2016 Mar 30.

c Department of Psychology , University of Denver.

This random assignment experimental study examined the intersection of children's coping and physiologic stress reactivity and recovery patterns in a sample of preadolescent boys and girls. A sample of 82 fourth-grade and fifth-grade (M = 10.59 years old) child-parent dyads participated in the present study. Children participated in the Trier Social Stress Test and were randomly assigned to one of two post-Trier Social Stress Test experimental coping conditions-behavioral distraction or cognitive avoidance. Children's characteristic ways of coping were examined as moderators of the effect of experimental coping condition on cortisol reactivity and recovery patterns. Multilevel modeling analyses indicated that children's characteristic coping and experimental coping condition interacted to predict differential cortisol recovery patterns. Children who characteristically engaged in primary control engagement coping strategies were able to more quickly down-regulate salivary cortisol when primed to distract themselves than when primed to avoid, and vice versa. The opposite pattern was true for characteristic disengagement coping in the context of coping condition, suggesting that regulatory fit between children's characteristic ways of coping and cues from their coping environment may lead to more and less adaptive physiologic recovery profiles. This study provides some of the first evidence that coping "gets under the skin" and that children's characteristic ways of coping may constrain or enhance a child's ability to make use of environmental coping resources.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2016.1141356DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6071424PMC
May 2019

Self-Regulation and Economic Stress in Children of Hispanic Immigrants and Their Peers: Better Regulation at a Cost?

Early Educ Dev 2016 15;27(7):914-931. Epub 2015 May 15.

Department of Psychology, University of Denver.

Research Findings: Although there is a well-established relationship between economic stress and children's self-regulation, few studies have examined this relationship in children of Hispanic immigrants (COHIs), a rapidly growing population. In a sample of preschool children ( = 165), we examined whether economic stress predicted teacher evaluations of children's self-regulation, whether economic stress predicted children's physiological reactivity (via cortisol levels), and whether economic stress had a similar effect on self-regulation and children's cortisol for COHI versus nonimmigrant children. Greater economic stress was associated with poorer child self-regulation and heightened physiological reactivity across a challenging classroom task for the sample as a whole. However, when we examined children by group, greater economic stress was associated with poorer teacher-reported self-regulation for nonimmigrant children only. In contrast, greater economic stress was related to greater cortisol reactivity across a challenge task for COHIs but not for nonimmigrants.

Practice Or Policy: Results demonstrate the importance of considering physiological indices of self-regulation (heightened stress physiology), in addition to traditional external indices (teacher report), when assessing self-regulation or risk more generally among preschool samples that are diverse in terms of ethnicity, economic risk, and parents' nativity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10409289.2015.1036345DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5608096PMC
May 2015

A longitudinal examination of the Adaptation to Poverty-Related Stress Model: predicting child and adolescent adjustment over time.

J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol 2013 16;42(5):713-25. Epub 2013 Jan 16.

a Department of Psychology , The Pennsylvania State University.

This study tests key tenets of the Adaptation to Poverty-related Stress Model. This model (Wadsworth, Raviv, Santiago, & Etter, 2011 ) builds on Conger and Elder's family stress model by proposing that primary control coping and secondary control coping can help reduce the negative effects of economic strain on parental behaviors central to the family stress model, namely, parental depressive symptoms and parent-child interactions, which together can decrease child internalizing and externalizing problems. Two hundred seventy-five co-parenting couples with children between the ages of 1 and 18 participated in an evaluation of a brief family strengthening intervention, aimed at preventing economic strain's negative cascade of influence on parents, and ultimately their children. The longitudinal path model, analyzed at the couple dyad level with mothers and fathers nested within couple, showed very good fit, and was not moderated by child gender or ethnicity. Analyses revealed direct positive effects of primary control coping and secondary control coping on mothers' and fathers' depressive symptoms. Decreased economic strain predicted more positive father-child interactions, whereas increased secondary control coping predicted less negative mother-child interactions. Positive parent-child interactions, along with decreased parent depression and economic strain, predicted child internalizing and externalizing over the course of 18 months. Multiple-group models analyzed separately by parent gender revealed, however, that child age moderated father effects. Findings provide support for the adaptation to poverty-related stress model and suggest that prevention and clinical interventions for families affected by poverty-related stress may be strengthened by including modules that address economic strain and efficacious strategies for coping with strain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2012.755926DOI Listing
May 2014