Publications by authors named "Elena Zakharova"

79 Publications

International Society of Nephrology Global Kidney Health Atlas: structures, organization, and services for the management of kidney failure in Newly Independent States and Russia.

Kidney Int Suppl (2011) 2021 May 12;11(2):e57-e65. Epub 2021 Apr 12.

High Technology Medical Center University Clinic, Tbilisi State Medical University, Tbilisi, Georgia.

The International Society of Nephrology Global Kidney Health Atlas analyzed the current state of kidney care in Newly Independent States and Russia. Our results demonstrated that the Newly Independent States and Russia region was not an exception and showed the same effect of chronic kidney disease on health and its outcomes, facing many difficulties and challenges in terms of improving kidney care across the countries. This work summarized and presented demographics, health information systems, statistics, and national health policy of the region, as well as characteristics of the burden of chronic kidney disease and kidney failure (KF) of participating countries. Besides significant economic advancement in the region, the collected data revealed existing shortage in KF care providers, essential medications, and health product access for KF care. Moreover, there was low reporting of kidney replacement therapy (dialysis and kidney transplantation) quality indicators and low capacity for long-term hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and kidney transplantation. The financial issues and funding structures for KF care across the region needs strategic support for fundamental changes and further advancement. This article emphasizes the urgent need for further effective regional and international collaborations and partnership for establishment of universal health care systems for KF management.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.kisu.2021.01.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8084727PMC
May 2021

Diaportheone A Analogues Instigate a Neuroprotective Effect by Protecting Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells from Oxidative Stress.

Biology (Basel) 2021 Mar 5;10(3). Epub 2021 Mar 5.

Department of Bionano Technology, Bionano Research Institute, Gachon University, 1342 Seongnam-daero, Sujung-gu, Seongnam-si 461-701, Korea.

Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains an incurable neurodegenerative illness. Oxidative stress resulting in the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the abnormal deposition of amyloid- (Aβ) are the major pathological hallmarks associated with AD. In search for small molecules targeting multiple pathways of AD and of no known molecular targets, the neuroprotective effects of the synthetic chromones diaportheone A1 and diaportheone A2, analogues of the natural product diaportheone A, were investigated. Chromones are heterocyclic compounds bearing the benzoannelated γ-pyrone moiety and were regarded as an important class of organic molecules due to their diverse pharmacological activities. The influence of the compounds on the inhibition of Aβ aggregation was determined by Thioflavin T (ThT) assay, and the cell viability, ROS, and mitochondrial membrane potential were evaluated with human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Results showed that both compounds inhibited the Aβ aggregation at 80.41% and 73.68% for diaportheone A1 and diaportheone A2, respectively. Increased cell viabilities were observed from the protection by both compounds using Aβ- or HO-induced SH-SY5Y cells. Both compounds also reduced the intracellular ROS level in Aβ- or HO-induced SH-SY5Y cells at 10 and 20 μM concentrations, and increased the mitochondrial membrane potentials in Aβ-induced SH-SY5Y cells at 20 μM concentration. Molecular docking experiments using the Aβ protein models 2MXU and 2BEG also indicated a good agreement with the experimental data. The results demonstrated for the first time the oxidative stress effects associated with the chromones diaportheone A1 and diaportheone A2 as potential neuroprotective therapeutic agents against AD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/biology10030199DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8002093PMC
March 2021

Interaction of Lactoferrin with Unsaturated Fatty Acids: In Vitro and In Vivo Study of Human Lactoferrin/Oleic Acid Complex Cytotoxicity.

Materials (Basel) 2021 Mar 25;14(7). Epub 2021 Mar 25.

Institute of Experimental Medicine, 12 Acad. Pavlov Street, 197376 Saint-Petersburg, Russia.

As shown recently, oleic acid (OA) in complex with lactoferrin (LF) causes the death of cancer cells, but no mechanism(s) of that toxicity have been disclosed. In this study, constitutive parameters of the antitumor effect of LF/OA complex were explored. Complex LF/OA was prepared by titrating recombinant human LF with OA. Spectral analysis was used to assess possible structural changes of LF within its complex with OA. Structural features of apo-LF did not change within the complex LF:OA = 1:8, which was toxic for hepatoma 22a cells. Cytotoxicity of the complex LF:OA = 1:8 was tested in cultured hepatoma 22a cells and in fresh erythrocytes. Its anticancer activity was tested in mice carrying hepatoma 22a. In mice injected daily with LF-8OA, the same tumor grew significantly slower. In 20% of animals, the tumors completely resolved. LF alone was less efficient, i.e., the tumor growth index was 0.14 for LF-8OA and 0.63 for LF as compared with 1.0 in the control animals. The results of testing from 48 days after the tumor inoculation showed that the survival rate among LF-8OA-treated animals was 70%, contrary to 0% rate in the control group and among the LF-treated mice. Our data allow us to regard the complex of LF and OA as a promising tool for cancer treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma14071602DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8037541PMC
March 2021

Relative expansion of CD19-negative very-early normal B-cell precursors in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia after CD19 targeting by blinatumomab and CAR-T cell therapy: implications for flow cytometric detection of minimal residual disease.

Br J Haematol 2021 May 14;193(3):602-612. Epub 2021 Mar 14.

National Research and Clinical Center for Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, Moscow, Russian Federation.

CD19-directed treatment in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL) frequently leads to the downmodulation of targeted antigens. As multicolour flow cytometry (MFC) application for minimal/measurable residual disease (MRD) assessment in BCP-ALL is based on B-cell compartment study, CD19 loss could hamper MFC-MRD monitoring after blinatumomab or chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapy. The use of other antigens (CD22, CD10, CD79a, etc.) as B-lineage gating markers allows the identification of CD19-negative leukaemia, but it could also lead to misidentification of normal very-early CD19-negative BCPs as tumour blasts. In the current study, we summarized the results of the investigation of CD19-negative normal BCPs in 106 children with BCP-ALL who underwent CD19 targeting (blinatumomab, n = 64; CAR-T, n = 25; or both, n = 17). It was found that normal CD19-negative BCPs could be found in bone marrow after CD19-directed treatment more frequently than in healthy donors and children with BCP-ALL during chemotherapy or after stem cell transplantation. Analysis of the antigen expression profile revealed that normal CD19-negative BCPs could be mixed up with residual leukaemic blasts, even in bioinformatic analyses of MFC data. The results of our study should help to investigate MFC-MRD more accurately in patients who have undergone CD19-targeted therapy, even in cases with normal CD19-negative BCP expansion.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.17382DOI Listing
May 2021

A roadmap for optimizing chronic kidney disease patient care and patient-oriented research in the Eastern European nephrology community.

Clin Kidney J 2021 Jan 22;14(1):23-35. Epub 2020 Dec 22.

Division of Nephrology, Ambroise Paré University Hospital, APHP, University of Paris Ouest-Versailles-St-Quentin-en-Yvelines (UVSQ) av G De Gaulles Boulogne-Billancourt/Paris, x, FR 92100; Inserm U1018, CESP Team 5-Epidemiology of Renal and Cardiovascular Disease, Villejuif, France.

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem because of its high prevalence, associated complications and high treatment costs. Several aspects of CKD differ significantly in the Eastern European nephrology community compared with Western Europe because of different geographic, socio-economic, infrastructure, cultural and educational features. The two most frequent aetiologies of CKD, DM and hypertension, and many other predisposing factors, are more frequent in the Eastern region, resulting in more prevalent CKD Stages 3-5. Interventions may minimize the potential drawbacks of the high prevalence of CKD in Eastern Europe, which include several options at various stages of the disease, such as raising public, medical personnel and healthcare authorities awareness; early detection by screening high-risk populations; preventing progression and CKD-related complications by training health professionals and patients; promoting transplantation or home dialysis as the preferred modality; disseminating and implementing guidelines and guided therapy and encouraging/supporting country-specific observational research as well as international collaborative projects. Specific ways to significantly impact CKD-related problems in every region of Europe through education, science and networking are collaboration with non-nephrology European societies who have a common interest in CKD and its associated complications, representation through an advisory role within nephrology via national nephrology societies, contributing to the training of local nephrologists and stimulating patient-oriented research. The latter is mandatory to identify country-specific kidney disease-related priorities. Active involvement of patients in this research via collaboration with the European Kidney Patient Federation or national patient federations is imperative to ensure that projects reflect specific patient needs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ckj/sfaa218DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7857792PMC
January 2021

Opposite Pathways of Cholinergic Mechanisms of Hypoxic Preconditioning in the Hippocampus: Participation of Nicotinic α7 Receptors and Their Association with the Baseline Level of Startle Prepulse Inhibition.

Brain Sci 2020 Dec 24;11(1). Epub 2020 Dec 24.

Laboratory of General Pathology of Cardiorespiratory System, Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology, Baltiyskaya, 8, 125315 Moscow, Russia.

(1) Background. A one-time moderate hypobaric hypoxia (HBH) has a preconditioning effect whose neuronal mechanisms are not studied well. Previously, we found a stable correlation between the HBH efficiency and acoustic startle prepulse inhibition (PPI). This makes it possible to predict the individual efficiency of HBH in animals and to study its potential adaptive mechanisms. We revealed a bi-directional action of nicotinic α7 receptor agonist PNU-282987 and its solvent dimethyl sulfoxide on HBH efficiency with the level of PPI > or < 40%. (2) The aim of the present study was to estimate cholinergic mechanisms of HBH effects in different brain regions. (3) Methods: in rats pretested for PPI, we evaluated the activity of synaptic membrane-bound and water-soluble choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in the sub-fractions of 'light' and 'heavy' synaptosomes of the neocortex, hippocampus and caudal brainstem in the intact brain and after HBH. We tested the dose-dependent influence of PNU-282987 on the HBH efficiency. (4) Results: PPI level and ChAT activity correlated negatively in all brain structures of the intact animals, so that the values of the latter were higher in rats with PPI < 40% compared to those with PPI > 40%. After HBH, this ChAT activity difference was leveled in the neocortex and caudal brainstem, while for membrane-bound ChAT in the 'light' synaptosomal fraction of hippocampus, it was reversed to the opposite. In addition, a pharmacological study revealed that PNU-282987 in all used doses and its solvent displayed corresponding opposite effects on HBH efficiency in rats with different levels of PPI. (5) Conclusion: We substantiate that in rats with low and high PPI two opposite hippocampal cholinergic mechanisms are involved in hypoxic preconditioning, and both are implemented by forebrain projections via nicotinic α7 receptors. Possible causes of association between general protective adaptation, HBH, PPI, forebrain cholinergic system and hippocampus are discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11010012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7824639PMC
December 2020

Hepatitis C virus infection and global kidney health: the consensus proceedings of the International Federation of Kidney Foundations.

Afr J Nephrol 2020 ;23(1):159-168

Nephrology Department, Cliniques universitaires Saint-Luc and Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important cause of major morbidities including chronic liver disease, liver cancer, and acute kidney injury (AKI) as well as chronic kidney disease (CKD). HCV can affect kidney health; among CKD and AKI patients with HCV infection, the clinical outcomes are worse. The prevalence of HCV infection is exceptionally high among dialysis and kidney transplant patients throughout the globe. It is estimated that 5% to 25% or more of dialysis dependent patients are affected by chronic HCV, based on the region of the world. Almost half of all deaths in CKD patients, including HCV-infected patients, are due to cardiovascular disease, and HCV infected patients have higher mortality. Given the importance and impact of the HCV epidemic on CKD and global kidney health, and the status of Egypt as the nation with highest prevalence of HCV infection in the world along with its leading initiatives to eradicate HCV, the International Federation of Kidney Foundations (IFKF) convened a consensus conference in Cairo in December 2017. This article reflects the opinions and recommendations of the contributing experts and reiterates that with the current availability of highly effective and well tolerated pharmacotherapy; CKD patients should be given priority for treatment of HCV, as an important step towards the elimination of viral hepatitis as a public health problem by 2030 according to World Health Organization and IFKF. Every country should have an action plan with the goal to improve kidney health and CKD patient outcomes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7751950PMC
January 2020

Class 2 compression sleeves for full legs versus stockings after thermal ablation with phlebectomy: A randomized trial.

J Vasc Surg Venous Lymphat Disord 2021 Apr 20. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Department of Surgery, Military Medical Academy S. M. Kirov, St Petersburg, Russia.

Objective: Compression stockings and bandages are widely used after invasive treatment of varicose veins. The goals of compression after venous interventions are to reduce pain, bruising, and ecchymosis. Nevertheless, patients often report discomfort with the compression. To make postprocedural compression more tolerable, foot-sparing bandages were tested in a randomized clinical trial of noninferiority.

Methods: A total of 187 patients were randomized to use class II foot-sparing compression sleeves for the full leg or class II stockings after radiofrequency ablation with concomitant phlebectomy. The primary endpoint was the quality of life, measured using the Chronic Venous Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire 20-item scale 30 days after intervention. The secondary endpoints were pain in the leg and discomfort related to the compression garment, which were assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS) at 2, 7, 14, and 30 days.

Results: The global index score of the questionnaire was 66.1 and 70.6 and 83.8 and 87.7 for the sleeve and stocking groups before and 30 days after intervention, respectively (P = .542 and P = .150, respectively). The VAS for pain score in the operated leg was slightly higher in the sleeve group the day after the intervention (score, 2.1 vs 1.6; P = .03). At 7, 14, and 30 days, the VAS for pain scores did not differ significantly (score, 0.7 vs 0.5; 0.5 vs 0.3; and 0.1 vs 0.1, respectively; P = NS for all). The VAS for discomfort score was not significantly different statistically in the study group at 2 days (sleeve, 1.9; vs stocking, 1.4; P = .08) but was higher after 7 days (sleeve, 0.9; vs stocking, 0.6; P = .008). No difference in discomfort was found between the study and control groups at 14 or 30 days (sleeve, 0.6; vs stocking, 0.4; and sleeve, 0.4; vs stocking, 0.4, respectively; P = NS for both).

Conclusion: Quality of life after thermal ablation with phlebectomy improved equivalently in patients who had used class II compression sleeves for full legs and those who had used class II compression stockings. Pain and discomfort were slightly higher in the sleeve group.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvsv.2020.12.067DOI Listing
April 2021

Microbial Processes and Microbial Communities in the Water Column of the Polar Meromictic Lake Bol'shie Khruslomeny at the White Sea Coast.

Front Microbiol 2020 11;11:1945. Epub 2020 Aug 11.

Winogradsky Institute of Microbiology, Research Center of Biotechnology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.

Microbiological, molecular ecological, biogeochemical, and isotope geochemical research was carried out at the polar Lake Bol'shie Khruslomeny at the coast of the Kandalaksha Bay, White Sea in March and September 2017. The uppermost mixolimnion was oxic, with low salinity (3-5%). The lower chemocline layer was brown-green colored, with very high content of particulate organic matter (up to 11.8 mg C L). The lowermost monimolimnion had marine salinity (22-24%) and very high concentrations of sulfide (up to 18 mmol L) and CH (up to 1.8 mmol L). In the chemocline, total microbial abundance and the rate of anoxygenic photosynthesis were 8.8 × 10 cells mL and 34.4 μmol C L day, respectively. Both in March and September, sulfate reduction rate increased with depth, peaking (up to 0.6-1.1 μmol S L day) in the lower chemocline. Methane oxidation rates in the chemocline were up to 85 and 180 nmol CH L day in March and September, respectively; stimulation of this process by light was observed in September. The percentages of cyanobacteria and methanotrophs in the layer where light-induced methane oxidation occurred were similar, ∼2.5% of the microbial community. Light did not stimulate methane oxidation in deeper layers. The carbon isotope composition of particulate organic matter (δC-Corg), dissolved carbonates (δC-DIC), and methane (δC- CH) indicated high microbial activity in the chemocline. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed predominance of Cyanobium cyanobacteria (order Synechococcales) in the mixolimnion. Green sulfur bacteria capable of anoxygenic photosynthesis constituted ∼20% of the chemocline community both in March and in September. (family Methylomonaceae) were present in the upper chemocline, where active methane oxidation occurred. During winter, cyanobacteria were less abundant in the chemocline, while methanotrophs occurred in higher horizons, including the under-ice layer. Chemolithotrophic gammaproteobacteria of the genus Thiomicrorhabdus, oxidizing reduced sulfur compounds at low oxygen concentrations, were revealed in the chemocline in March. Both in March and September archaea constituted up to 50% of all microorganisms in the hypolimnion. The percentage of putative methanogens in the archaeal community was low, and they occurred mainly in near-bottom horizons.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2020.01945DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7432294PMC
August 2020

Challenges for sustainable end-stage kidney disease care in low-middle-income countries: the problem of the workforce.

Kidney Int Suppl (2011) 2020 Mar 19;10(1):e49-e54. Epub 2020 Feb 19.

Department of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

Prevention and early detection of kidney diseases in adults and children should be a priority for any government health department. This is particularly pertinent in the low-middle-income countries, mostly in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean, where up to 7 million people die because of lack of end-stage kidney disease treatment. The nephrology workforce (nurses, technicians, and doctors) is limited in these countries and expanding the size and expertise of the workforce is essential to permit expansion of treatment for both chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease. To achieve this will require sustained action and commitment from governments, academic medical centers, local nephrology societies, and the international nephrology community.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.kisu.2019.11.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7031680PMC
March 2020

Framework for establishing integrated kidney care programs in low- and middle-income countries.

Kidney Int Suppl (2011) 2020 Mar 19;10(1):e19-e23. Epub 2020 Feb 19.

Kidney Research Center, Department of Nephrology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

Secular increases in the burden of kidney failure is a major challenge for health systems worldwide, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) due to growing demand for expensive kidney replacement therapies. In LMICs with limited resources, the priority of providing kidney replacement therapies must be weighed against the prevention and treatment of chronic kidney disease, other kidney disorders such as acute kidney injury, and other noncommunicable diseases, as well as other urgent public health needs. Kidney failure is potentially preventable-not just through primary prevention of risk factors for kidney disease such as hypertension and diabetes, but also by timely management of established chronic kidney disease. Among people with established or incipient kidney failure, there are 3 key treatment strategies-conservative care, kidney transplantation, and dialysis-each of which has its own benefits. Joining up preventive care for people with or at risk for milder forms of chronic kidney disease with all 3 therapies for kidney failure (and developing synergistic links between the different treatment options) is termed "integrated kidney care" and has potential benefits for patients, families, and providers. In addition, because integrated kidney care implicitly considers resource use, it should facilitate a more sustainable approach to managing kidney failure than providing one or more of its components separately. There is currently no agreed framework that LMIC governments can use to establish and/or scale up programs to prevent and treat kidney failure or join up these programs to provide integrated kidney care. This review presents a suggested framework for establishing integrated kidney care programs, focusing on the anticipated needs of policy makers in LMICs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.kisu.2019.11.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7031683PMC
March 2020

Natalia Tomilina - personality and profession.

Authors:
Elena Zakharova

BMC Nephrol 2019 04 1;20(1):111. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Nephrology, Moscow City Hospital n.a. S.P. Botkin, Moscow, Russian Federation.

Natalina Tomilina, a pioneer of Russian nephrology, is a clinician, researcher, teacher, organizer, leader, and a real pioneer, who has worked in nephrology from the very beginning of its development in Russia and continues to inspire new generations of Russian nephrologists. Her interests are very broad: from the physiology and pathophysiology of water and electrolyte balance and tubular dysfunctions to the management of transplant rejection, and from nephropathology to the treatment of idiopathic glomerulonephritis and ANCA-associated vasculitis…. to name a few. She implemented peritoneal dialysis, started first ICU for kidney patients in Russia, opened the door for the international communications, initiated a registry of the patients receiving RRT, and she never stopped seeing patients with kidney problems. In the interview on can find not only the story of her professional life, but also standpoint and philosophy of a great personality. Answering the question about emigration she said: "I never wanted to leave - I have to work at home, where I know and understand almost everything about my patients. Don't talk about prosperity, prosperous life sooner or later becomes boring. Prosperity is not the main point, and this is not prosperity, what gives you satisfaction. I feel that one should live in the place where he or she has an opportunity for personal fulfillment ad maximum". Her personal fulfillment is 100 % indeed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12882-019-1303-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6442427PMC
April 2019

Synthesis of macrocyclic peptidomimetics via the Ugi-click-strategy.

Org Biomol Chem 2019 03;17(13):3433-3445

Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991, Russia.

The Ugi-click-strategy was employed for the synthesis of 12-28 membered 1,2,3-triazole derived macrocyclic peptidomimetics. The Ugi reaction with acid components bearing acetylenic fragments and azidoisocyanides provided the corresponding peptidomimetics in up to 97% isolated yield. The subsequent CuAAC click reaction with these bifunctional substrates containing both acetylene and azide groups was investigated to reveal the influence of the structure of Ugi products on the direction of the click-cyclization. It was demonstrated that this approach allows efficient synthesis of either monomeric (12- and 13-membered) or dimeric (24-, 26- and 28-membered) macrocycles prepared in up to 85% yield. The scope and limitations of this method are discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9ob00229dDOI Listing
March 2019

History, Current Advances, Problems, and Pitfalls of Nephrology in Russia.

Authors:
Elena Zakharova

Kidney Dis (Basel) 2018 Nov 31;4(4):238-245. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

Nephrology, Moscow City Hospital n.a. S.P. Botkin, Moscow, Russian Federation.

Background: The anatomy and physiology of kidneys as well as kidney diseases have been studied in Russia since the 18th century. However, there was a surge in interest in the 1920s, with numerous researchers and clinicians making substantial advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology, pathology, and diagnostics of kidney diseases. The field of nephrology as clinical practice can be traced back to 1957-1958, when the first beds for patients with kidney diseases became available and the first hemodialysis procedure was performed. Nephrology and hemodialysis units were opened soon after, offering kidney biopsy, corticosteroid and immunosuppressive therapies, and dialysis for acute renal failure and end stage of renal disease. In 1965 kidney transplantation commenced. Between 1970 and 1990, the number of centers providing care for patients with kidney diseases increased; however, they were insufficient to meet the demands of native kidney disorders and renal replacement therapy. To address this, several educational institutions established postgraduate programs in nephrology and dialysis, and professional societies and journals were funded. While economic changes at the end of the 1990s resulted in a rapid increase of dialysis service, kidney transplantation and pathology-based diagnostics of kidney diseases remained underdeveloped. During the last 2 decades cooperation among international professional societies, continuing medical education courses, and the translation and implementation of international guidelines have resulted in substantial improvements in the quality of care provided to patients with kidney diseases.

Summary: We describe the history and development of clinical nephrology, dialysis, kidney transplantation, education in nephrology and dialysis, professional societies and journals, and registry of patients on renal replacement therapy in Russia during almost 60 years. We also present the most recent registry data analysis, address current problems and difficulties, and stress the role of incorporation into the international nephrology community.

Key Message: Nephrology in Russia, despite currently experiencing many difficulties, made great advances during the 60 years of its development. General nephrology, nephropathology, and renal replacement therapy are developing fast; implementation of international guidelines, access to modern educational tools, and cooperation with international professional societies are improving the quality of care of renal patients and ensuring further progress.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000492634DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6276868PMC
November 2018

Pregnancy in Chronic Kidney Disease: Need for Higher Awareness. A Pragmatic Review Focused on What Could Be Improved in the Different CKD Stages and Phases.

J Clin Med 2018 Nov 5;7(11). Epub 2018 Nov 5.

Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada.

Pregnancy is possible in all phases of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but its management may be difficult and the outcomes are not the same as in the overall population. The prevalence of CKD in pregnancy is estimated at about 3%, as high as that of pre-eclampsia (PE), a better-acknowledged risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes. When CKD is known, pregnancy should be considered as high risk and followed accordingly; furthermore, since CKD is often asymptomatic, pregnant women should be screened for the presence of CKD, allowing better management of pregnancy, and timely treatment after pregnancy. The differential diagnosis between CKD and PE is sometimes difficult, but making it may be important for pregnancy management. Pregnancy is possible, even if at high risk for complications, including preterm delivery and intrauterine growth restriction, superimposed PE, and pregnancy-induced hypertension. Results in all phases are strictly dependent upon the socio-sanitary system and the availability of renal and obstetric care and, especially for preterm children, of intensive care units. Women on dialysis should be aware of the possibility of conceiving and having a successful pregnancy, and intensive dialysis (up to daily, long-hours dialysis) is the clinical choice allowing the best results. Such a choice may, however, need adaptation where access to dialysis is limited or distances are prohibitive. After kidney transplantation, pregnancies should be followed up with great attention, to minimize the risks for mother, child, and for the graft. A research agenda supporting international comparisons is highly needed to ameliorate or provide knowledge on specific kidney diseases and to develop context-adapted treatment strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes in CKD women.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm7110415DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6262338PMC
November 2018

Acute Kidney Injury in Pregnancy: The Need for Higher Awareness. A Pragmatic Review Focused on What Could Be Improved in the Prevention and Care of Pregnancy-Related AKI, in the Year Dedicated to Women and Kidney Diseases.

J Clin Med 2018 Oct 1;7(10). Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada.

Pregnancy-related acute kidney injury (pAKI), preeclampsia (PE), and the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are closely related conditions, which are, in turn, frequently linked to pre-existing and often non-diagnosed chronic kidney disease (CKD). The current literature and research mainly underline the effects of pregnancy complications on the offspring; this review strongly emphasizes the maternal health as well. These conditions not only negatively affect pregnancy outcomes, but have a relevant effect on the future health of affected mothers and their children. Therefore, dedicated diagnostic and follow-up programs are needed, for optimizing materno-foetal health and reducing the impact of pregnancy-related problems in the mothers and in the new generations. This narrative review, performed on the occasion of the 2018 World Kidney Day dedicated to women's health, focuses on three aspects of the problem. Firstly, the risk of AKI in the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (the risk is the highest in developing countries; however PE is the main cause of pregnancy related AKI worldwide). Secondly, the effect of AKI and the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy on the development of CKD in the mother and offspring: long-term risks are increased; the entity and the trajectories are still unknown. Thirdly, the role of CKD in the pathogenesis of AKI and the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy: CKD is a major risk factor and the most important element in the differential diagnosis; pregnancy is a precious occasion for early diagnosis of CKD. Higher awareness on the importance of AKI in pregnancy is needed to improve short and long term outcomes in mothers and children.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm7100318DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6210235PMC
October 2018

Microbial Community and Bioremediation of Groundwater by Nitrate Removal in the Zone of a Radioactive Waste Surface Repository.

Front Microbiol 2018 23;9:1985. Epub 2018 Aug 23.

V.I. Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.

The goal of the present work was to investigate the physicochemical and radiochemical conditions and the composition of the microbial community in the groundwater of a suspended surface repository for radioactive waste (Russia) and to determine the possibility of groundwater bioremediation by removal of nitrate ions. Groundwater in the repository area (10-m depth) had elevated concentrations of strontium, tritium, nitrate, sulfate, and bicarbonate ions. High-throughput sequencing of the V3-V4/V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene revealed the presence of members of the phyla (genera , and uncultured ), (genera and ), and ( Planktophila, ). Canonical correspondence analysis suggested that major contaminant - nitrate, uranium, and sulfate shaped the composition of groundwater microbial community. Groundwater samples contained culturable aerobic organotrophic, as well as anaerobic fermenting, iron-reducing, and denitrifying bacteria. Pure cultures of 33 bacterial strains belonging to 15 genera were isolated. Members of the genera , and reduced nitrate to nitrite and/or dinitrogen. Application of specific primers revealed the and genes encoding nitrite reductases in bacteria of the genera , and . Nitrate reduction by pure bacterial cultures resulted in decreased ambient Eh. Among the organic substrates tested, sodium acetate and milk whey were the best for stimulation of denitrification by the microcosms with groundwater microorganisms. Injection of these substrates into the subterranean horizon (single-well push-pull test) resulted in temporary removal of nitrate ions in the area of the suspended radioactive waste repository and confirmed the possibility for application of this method for bioremediation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2018.01985DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6115527PMC
August 2018

Recent dynamics of hydro-ecosystems in thermokarst depressions in Central Siberia from satellite and in situ observations: Importance for agriculture and human life.

Sci Total Environ 2018 Feb 17;615:1290-1304. Epub 2017 Oct 17.

Institute of the Biological Problems of the Cryolithozone, SB RAS, Lenin ave. 41, Yakutsk 677980, Russia; Melnikov Permafrost Institute, SB RAS, Merzlotnaya 36, Yakutsk 677010, Russia.

Alases, which are thermokarst depressions that are occupied by grasslands and lakes, are an important element of the Central Yakutian periglacial landscape. In recent decades, climatic changes in Central Yakutia have resulted in important changes in environmental conditions. We use different remote-sensing instruments (Landsat 8, TerraSAR-X, ENVISAT-RA2, and Jason-2) alongside in situ observations to investigate 1) the spatial distribution and water regime of alas lakes and their relationships with climatic and geomorphologic factors, 2) the relationship of the alas' grassland productivity with the water regime and 3) the potential of alas grasslands for local agriculture. During the 2002-2010 period, the lake water level rose by 1.3m on average, resulting in lake expansion throughout the region. Since 2011, the lake area decreased and the water level declined by 70cm on the middle terraces (low ground-ice content), while the wetting trend continued until 2016 at higher elevations. Small thermokarst lakes (<0.025km), which indicate regions of young thermokarst, comprise up to 11% of the total lake area and experience high (30%) seasonal variations. In situ observations of the grassland dynamics show their synchronous cyclic variability with the lake extent and a general increasing trend for their productivity since 1985. Around 50% of these dynamics can be explained by the amount of pre-winter precipitation with a delay of two years. We explain this delay through the buffering effect of watershed soils. The cyclic variability of alas hydro-ecosystems strongly affects the local agriculture, which is based on horse and cattle breeding. We estimate that these alas grasslands can provide enough forage supply for local communities. However, the real alas yield is several times less than the theoretical value because of grassland degradation that is caused by recent thermokarst and waterlogging in the most productive phytocenosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.09.059DOI Listing
February 2018

Women and Kidney Diseases: Questions Unanswered and Answers Unquestioned.

Kidney Int Rep 2018 Mar 6;3(2):225-235. Epub 2018 Jan 6.

Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ekir.2018.01.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5932302PMC
March 2018

What we do and do not know about women and kidney diseases; Questions unanswered and answers unquestioned: Reflection on World Kidney Day and International Woman's Day.

Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2018 Mar-Apr;29(2):261-275

Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Chronic Kidney Disease affects approximately 10% of the world's adult population: it is within the top 20 causes of death worldwide, and its impact on patients and their families can be devastating. World Kidney Day and International Women's Day in 2018 coincide, thus offering an opportunity to reflect on the importance of women's health and specifically their kidney health, on the community, and the next generations, as well as to strive to be more curious about the unique aspects of kidney disease in women so that we may apply those learnings more broadly. Girls and women, who make up approximately 50% of the world's population, are important contributors to society and their families. Gender differences continue to exist around the world in access to education, medical care, and participation in clinical studies. Pregnancy is a unique state for women, offering an opportunity for diagnosis of kidney disease, but also a state where acute and chronic kidney diseases may manifest, and which may impact future generations with respect to kidney health. There are various autoimmune and other conditions that are more likely to impact women with profound consequences for child bearing, and on the fetus. Women have different complications on dialysis than men, and are more likely to be donors than recipients of kidney transplants. In this editorial, we focus on what we do and do not know about women, kidney health, and kidney disease, and what we might learn in the future to improve outcomes worldwide. Kidney Health and Women's Health: a case for optimizing outcomes for present and future generations.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/1319-2442.229286DOI Listing
October 2019

Women and kidney disease: reflections on World Kidney Day 2018.

Nephrol Ther 2018 04;14(2):67-70

Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nephro.2018.02.001DOI Listing
April 2018

What We Do and Do Not Know about Women and Kidney Diseases; Questions Unanswered and Answers Unquestioned: Reflection on World Kidney Day and International Women's Day.

Kidney Dis (Basel) 2018 Feb 1;4(1):37-48. Epub 2018 Feb 1.

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Chronic kidney disease affects approximately 10$ of the world's adult population: it is within the top 20 causes of death worldwide, and its impact on patients and their families can be devastating. World Kidney Day and International Women's Day in 2018 coincide, thus offering an opportunity to reflect on the importance of women's health and specifically their kidney health, on the community and the next generations, as well as to strive to be more curious about the unique aspects of kidney disease in women so that we may apply those learnings more broadly. Girls and women, who make up approximately 50$ of the world's population, are important contributors to society and their families. Gender differences continue to exist around the world in access to education, medical care, and participation in clinical studies. Pregnancy is a unique state for women, offering an opportunity for diagnosis of kidney disease, but also a state where acute and chronic kidney diseases may manifest, and which may impact future generations with respect to kidney health. There are various autoimmune and other conditions that are more likely to have an impact on women, with profound consequences for child bearing, and on the fetus. Women have different complications on dialysis than men, and are more likely to be donors than recipients of kidney transplants. In this editorial, we focus on what we do and do not know about women, kidney health, and kidney disease, and what we might learn in the future to improve outcomes worldwide.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000485269DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5848484PMC
February 2018

What We Do and Do Not Know About Women and Kidney Diseases; Questions Unanswered and Answers Unquestioned: Reflection on World Kidney Day and International Woman's Day.

Can J Kidney Health Dis 2018 8;5:2054358118761656. Epub 2018 Mar 8.

Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

Background: Chronic kidney disease affects approximately 10% of the world's adult population: It is within the top 20 causes of death worldwide, and its impact on patients and their families can be devastating. World Kidney Day and International Women's Day in 2018 coincide, thus giving an occasion to reflect on open questions on the importance of kidney health in women for the present and the future generations.

Objectives: In this review, we summarize some aspects that are unique to women's kidney health, offering an opportunity to reflect on the importance of women's health and specifically their kidney health, on the community, and the next generations, as well as to strive to be more curious about the unique aspects of kidney disease in women so that we may apply those learnings more broadly.

Findings: Girls and women, who make up approximately 50% of the world's population, are important contributors to society and their families. Gender differences continue to exist around the world in access to education, medical care, and participation in clinical studies. Pregnancy is not only a unique state for women, offering an opportunity for diagnosis of kidney disease, but also a state where acute and chronic kidney diseases may manifest, and which may impact future generations with respect to kidney health. There are various autoimmune and other conditions that are more likely to impact women with profound consequences for childbearing, and on the fetus. Women have different complications on dialysis than men, and are more likely to be donors than recipients of kidney transplants.

Conclusion: Improving knowledge on women, kidney health, and kidney disease, may be a way to improve outcomes of kidney diseases worldwide.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2054358118761656DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5846917PMC
March 2018

What we do and do not know about women and kidney diseases; questions unanswered and answers unquestioned: reflection on World Kidney Day and International Woman's Day.

BMC Nephrol 2018 03 15;19(1):66. Epub 2018 Mar 15.

Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Chronic Kidney Disease affects approximately 10% of the world's adult population: it is within the top 20 causes of death worldwide, and its impact on patients and their families can be devastating. World Kidney Day and International Women's Day in 2018 coincide, thus offering an opportunity to reflect on the importance of women's health and specifically their kidney health, on the community, and the next generations, as well as to strive to be more curious about the unique aspects of kidney disease in women so that we may apply those learnings more broadly.Girls and women, who make up approximately 50% of the world's population, are important contributors to society and their families. Gender differences continue to exist around the world in access to education, medical care, and participation in clinical studies. Pregnancy is a unique state for women, offering an opportunity for diagnosis of kidney disease, but also a state where acute and chronic kidney diseases may manifest, and which may impact future generations with respect to kidney health. There are various autoimmune and other conditions that are more likely to impact women with profound consequences for child bearing, and on the fetus. Women have different complications on dialysis than men, and are more likely to be donors than recipients of kidney transplants.In this editorial, we focus on what we do and do not know about women, kidney health, and kidney disease, and what we might learn in the future to improve outcomes worldwide.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12882-018-0864-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5856379PMC
March 2018

What We Do and Do Not Know About Women and Kidney Diseases: Questions Unanswered and Answers Unquestioned: Reflection on World Kidney Day and International Woman's Day.

Iran J Kidney Dis 2018 03;12(2):65-77

Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Chronic kidney disease affects approximately 10% of the world's adult population; it is within the top 20 causes of death worldwide, and its impact on patients and their families can be devastating. The World Kidney Day and the International Women's Day coincide in 2018, thus offering an opportunity to reflect on the importance of women's health, and specifically their kidney health, on the community and the next generations, as well as to strive to be more curious about the unique aspects of kidney disease in women so that we may apply those learnings more broadly. Girls and women, who make up approximately 50% of the world's population, are important contributors to society and their families. Gender differences continue to exist around the world in access to education, medical care, and participation in clinical studies. Pregnancy is a unique state for women, offering an opportunity for diagnosis of kidney disease, but also a state where acute and chronic kidney diseases may manifest, and which may impact future generations with respect to kidney health. There are various autoimmune and other conditions that are more likely to impact women, with profound consequences for child bearing and the fetus. Women have different complications on dialysis than men, and are more likely to be donors than recipients of kidney transplants. In this editorial, we focus on what we do and do not know about women's kidney health and kidney disease, and what we might learn in the future to improve outcomes worldwide.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2018

What we do and do not know about women and kidney diseases: Questions unanswered and answers unquestioned : Reflection on World Kidney Day and International Woman's Day.

Pediatr Nephrol 2018 04 1;33(4):529-540. Epub 2018 Mar 1.

Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00467-018-3917-3DOI Listing
April 2018

What We Do and Do Not Know about Women and Kidney Diseases; Questions Unanswered and Answers Unquestioned: Reflection on World Kidney Day and International Woman's Day.

Blood Purif 2018 16;45(4):364-375. Epub 2018 Feb 16.

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Chronic kidney disease affects approximately 10% of the world's adult population: it is within the top 20 causes of death worldwide, and its impact on patients and their families can be devastating. World Kidney Day and International Women's Day in 2018 coincide, thus offering an opportunity to reflect on the importance of women's health and specifically their kidney health, on the community and the next generations, as well as to strive to be more curious about the unique aspects of kidney disease in women so that we may apply those learnings more broadly. Girls and women, who make up approximately 50% of the world's population, are important contributors to society and their families. Gender differences continue to exist around the world in access to education, medical care, and participation in clinical studies. Pregnancy is a unique state for women, offering an opportunity for diagnosis of kidney disease, but also a state where acute and chronic kidney diseases may manifest, and which may impact future generations with respect to kidney health. There are various autoimmune and other conditions that are more likely to have an impact on women, with profound consequences for child bearing, and on the fetus. Women have different complications on dialysis than men, and are more likely to be donors than recipients of kidney transplants. In this editorial, we focus on what we do and do not know about women, kidney health, and kidney disease, and what we might learn in the future to improve outcomes worldwide.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000484686DOI Listing
February 2019

Women and Kidney Disease: Reflections on World Kidney Day 2018.

Nephrol Nurs J 2018 Jan-Feb;45(1):65-70

Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

World Kidney Day and International Women's Day 2018 are commemorated on the same day (March 8), an opportunity to highlight the importance of women's health, and particularly, their kidney health. On its 13th anniversary, World Kidney Day promotes affordable and equitable access to health education, health care, and prevention for all women and girls in the world. In this article, we focus on what we do and do not know about women, kidney health, and kidney disease, and what we might learn in the future to improve outcomes worldwide.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2018