Publications by authors named "Elena V Spirina"

5 Publications

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Insights into community of photosynthetic microorganisms from permafrost.

FEMS Microbiol Ecol 2020 11;96(12)

Soil Cryology Laboratory, Institute of Physicochemical and Biological Problems in Soil Science, Institutskaya Street, Bldg. 2, Pushchino, Russia.

This work integrates cultivation studies of Siberian permafrost and analyses of metagenomes from different locations in the Arctic with the aim of obtaining insights into the community of photosynthetic microorganisms in perennially frozen deposits. Cyanobacteria and microalgae have been described in Arctic aquatic and surface soil environments, but their diversity and ability to withstand harsh conditions within the permafrost are still largely unknown. Community structure of photosynthetic organisms in permafrost sediments was explored using Arctic metagenomes available through the MG-RAST. Sequences affiliated with cyanobacteria represented from 0.25 to 3.03% of total sequences, followed by sequences affiliated with Streptophyta (algae and vascular plants) 0.01-0.45% and Chlorophyta (green algae) 0.01-0.1%. Enrichment and cultivation approaches revealed that cyanobacteria and green algae survive in permafrost and they could be revived during prolonged incubation at low light intensity. Among photosynthetic microorganisms isolated from permafrost, the filamentous Oscillatoria-like cyanobacteria and unicellular green algae of the genus Chlorella were dominant. Our findings suggest that permafrost cyanobacteria and green algae are expected to be effective members of the re-assembled community after permafrost thawing and soil collapse.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/femsec/fiaa229DOI Listing
November 2020

Draft Genome Sequence of Microbacterium sp. Gd 4-13, Isolated from Gydanskiy Peninsula Permafrost Sediments of Marine Origin.

Microbiol Resour Announc 2019 Oct 3;8(40). Epub 2019 Oct 3.

Institute of Physicochemical and Biological Problems in Soil Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Russia.

Here, we report the draft genome sequence of sp. strain Gd 4-13, isolated from late Pleistocene permafrost of marine origin located on the Gydanskiy Peninsula. Genome sequence analysis was performed to understand strain survivability mechanisms under permafrost conditions and to expand biotechnology applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MRA.00889-19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6776773PMC
October 2019

Methanogens in the Antarctic Dry Valley permafrost.

FEMS Microbiol Ecol 2018 08;94(8)

Institute of Physicochemical and Biological Problems in Soil Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, 142290, Russia.

Polar permafrost is at the forefront of climate change, yet only a few studies have enriched the native methane-producing microbes that might provide positive feedbacks to climate change. Samples Ant1 and Ant2, collected in Antarctic Miers Valley from permafrost sediments, with and without biogenic methane, respectively, were evaluated for methanogenic activity and presence of methanogens. After a one-year incubation of both samples under anaerobic conditions, methane production was observed only at room temperature in microcosm Ant1 with CO2/H2 (20/80) as carbon and energy sources and was monitored during the subsequent 10 years. The concentration of methane in the headspace of microcosm Ant1 changed from 0.8% to a maximum of 45%. Archaeal 16S rRNA genes from microcosm Ant1 were related to psychrotolerant Methanosarcina lacustris. Repeated efforts at achieving a pure culture of this organism were unsuccessful. Metagenomic reads obtained for the methane-producing microcosm Ant1 were assembled and resulted in a 99.84% complete genome affiliated with the genus Methanosarcina. The metagenome assembled genome contained cold-adapted enzymes and pathways suggesting that the novel uncultured Methanosarcina sp. Ant1 is adapted to sub-freezing conditions in permafrost. This is the first methanogen genome reported from the 15 000 years old permafrost of the Antarctic Dry Valleys.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/femsec/fiy109DOI Listing
August 2018

New member of the hormone-sensitive lipase family from the permafrost microbial community.

Bioengineered 2017 Jul 18;8(4):420-423. Epub 2016 Oct 18.

b Institute of Physicochemical and Biological Problems in Soil Science , Russian Academy of Sciences , Pushchino , Russia.

Siberian permafrost is a unique environment inhabited with diverse groups of microorganisms. Among them, there are numerous producers of biotechnologically relevant enzymes including lipases and esterases. Recently, we have constructed a metagenomic library from a permafrost sample and identified in it several genes coding for potential lipolytic enzymes. In the current work, properties of the recombinant esterases obtained from this library are compared with the previously characterized lipase from Psychrobacter cryohalolentis and other representatives of the hormone-sensitive lipase family.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21655979.2016.1230571DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5553336PMC
July 2017

Expression and characterization of a new esterase with GCSAG motif from a permafrost metagenomic library.

FEMS Microbiol Ecol 2016 May 28;92(5):fiw046. Epub 2016 Feb 28.

Institute of Physicochemical and Biological Problems in Soil Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Institutskaya str., 2, 142290, Pushchino, Moscow Region, Russia.

As a result of construction and screening of a metagenomic library prepared from a permafrost-derived microcosm, we have isolated a novel gene coding for a putative lipolytic enzyme that belongs to the hormone-sensitive lipase family. It encodes a polypeptide of 343 amino acid residues whose amino acid sequence displays maximum likelihood with uncharacterized proteins from Sphingomonas species. A putative catalytic serine residue of PMGL2 resides in a new variant of a recently discovered GTSAG sequence in which a Thr residue is replaced by a Cys residue (GCSAG). The recombinant PMGL2 was produced in Escherichia coli cells and purified by Ni-affinity chromatography. The resulting protein preferably utilizes short-chain p-nitrophenyl esters (C4 and C8) and therefore is an esterase. It possesses maximum activity at 45°C in slightly alkaline conditions and has limited thermostability at higher temperatures. Activity of PMGL2 is stimulated in the presence of 0.25-1.5 M NaCl indicating the good salt tolerance of the new enzyme. Mass spectrometric analysis demonstrated that N-terminal methionine in PMGL2 is processed and cysteine residues do not form a disulfide bond. The results of the study demonstrate the significance of the permafrost environment as a unique genetic reservoir and its potential for metagenomic exploration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/femsec/fiw046DOI Listing
May 2016
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