Publications by authors named "Elena Boyakova"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Low-dose donor memory T-cell infusion after TCR alpha/beta depleted unrelated and haploidentical transplantation: results of a pilot trial.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2018 03 21;53(3):264-273. Epub 2017 Dec 21.

Department of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Dmitriy Rogachev National Center for Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, Moscow, Russia.

Recovery of immunity is delayed in recipients of T-depleted grafts. Adoptive transfer of memory T-cells may improve immune response to common pathogens. A cohort of 53 patients with malignant (n = 36) and non-malignant conditions (n = 17) received TCR alpha/beta depleted grafts from haploidentical (n = 25) or MUD (n = 28) donors. Donor lymphocytes were depleted of CD45RA-positive cells. At a median of 48 days after transplantation, patients received DLI at 25 × 10/kg CD3 cells from haploidentical or 100 × 10/kg CD3 from MUD donors. Up to 3 doses of donor lymphocytes were administered at monthly intervals, escalating to 100 × 10/kg in haploidentical transplants and 300 × 10/kg in MUD transplants. At a median follow-up of 23 months, the cumulative incidence of de novo acute GVHD after DLI is 2% (1 of 43), while the rate of reactivation of preexisting aGVHD was 50% (5 of 10). The transplant-related mortality is 6%. The overall survival rates are 80% and 88% in malignant and non-malignant conditions, respectively. Among patients with absent CMV-specific immune reactivity at baseline (n = 31) expansion of CMV-specific T-cells was demonstrated in 20 (64.5%) within 100 days. Infusions of low dose donor memory T-lymphocytes are safe and constitute a simple measure to prevent infections in the setting of alpha/beta T cell-depleted transplantation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-017-0035-yDOI Listing
March 2018

Risk Factors for and the Clinical Impact of Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus Infections in Pediatric Recipients of TCR-α/β- and CD19-Depleted Grafts.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2017 Mar 27;23(3):483-490. Epub 2016 Dec 27.

Department of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Dmitriy Rogachev Federal Center for Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address:

Alpha/beta T cell and CD19 depletion are used to improve the outcomes of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We evaluated the burden of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in pediatric patients after this HSCT type. A cohort of 182 patients with malignant (n = 114) or nonmalignant (n = 68) disorders was transplanted from either matched unrelated (n = 124) or haploidentical (n = 58) donors. The cumulative incidence of CMV and EBV viremia were 51% and 33%, respectively. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) grades II to IV, D-/R+ serology, and malignant HSCT indications were associated with increased risk of CMV viremia. CMV disease developed in 10 patients (6%). The occurrence of CMV viremia was not associated with inferior outcomes. Acute GVHD grade ≥ II was the only factor significantly associated with an increased risk of EBV viremia. Rituximab significantly decreased the rate of EBV reactivation in a subgroup that received a higher B cell dose in the graft. The rate of EBV-associated disease was .5%, and EBV viremia did not affect survival. TCR-α/β and CD19 depletion are associated with a significant rate of CMV viremia that does not affect survival. The hazard of EBV post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is eliminated by the combination of CD19 depletion and rituximab.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2016.12.635DOI Listing
March 2017

An inter-laboratory comparison of PNH clone detection by high-sensitivity flow cytometry in a Russian cohort.

Hematology 2015 Jan 26;20(1):31-8. Epub 2014 Mar 26.

Objectives: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an acquired clonal stem cell disorder characterized by partial or absolute deficiency of glycophosphatidyl-inositol (GPI) anchor-linked surface proteins on blood cells. A lack of precise diagnostic standards for flow cytometry has hampered useful comparisons of data between laboratories. We report data from the first study evaluating the reproducibility of high-sensitivity flow cytometry for PNH in Russia.

Methods: PNH clone sizes were determined at diagnosis in PNH patients at a central laboratory and compared with follow-up measurements in six laboratories across the country. Analyses in each laboratory were performed according to recommendations from the International Clinical Cytometry Society (ICCS) and the more recent 'practical guidelines'. Follow-up measurements were compared with each other and with the values determined at diagnosis.

Results: PNH clone size measurements were determined in seven diagnosed PNH patients (five females, two males: mean age 37 years); five had a history of aplastic anemia and three (one with and two without aplastic anemia) had severe hemolytic PNH and elevated plasma lactate dehydrogenase. PNH clone sizes at diagnosis were low in patients with less severe clinical symptoms (0.41-9.7% of granulocytes) and high in patients with severe symptoms (58-99%). There were only minimal differences in the follow-up clone size measurement for each patient between the six laboratories, particularly in those with high values at diagnosis.

Conclusions: The ICCS-recommended high-sensitivity flow cytometry protocol was effective for detecting major and minor PNH clones in Russian PNH patients, and showed high reproducibility between laboratories.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/1607845414Y.0000000162DOI Listing
January 2015

Response of pure red cell aplasia to cyclophosphamide after failure of mycofenolate mofetil in a patient with polyglandular syndrome type I.

J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2013 Nov;35(8):e338-40

*Endocrinology Research Centre, Institute of Pediatric Endocrinology †Federal Research Center for Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, and Immunology, Moscow, Russian Federation.

A 26-year-old female with the classic major and minor components of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 was diagnosed as having pure red cell aplasia. Treatment with 1.5 g/d mycofenolate mofetil for 3 months failed to restore erythroid production. Treatment with cyclosporine A produced a good partial response but led to renal toxicity and was therefore substituted with cyclophosphamide, which had a good partial effect and lasted for 18 months. The relapse of anemia was not observed during the 6-month follow-up period after the cessation of treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPH.0b013e3182755c52DOI Listing
November 2013