Publications by authors named "Elena Alieva"

8 Publications

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Photonic crystal surface mode imaging for multiplexed and high-throughput label-free biosensing.

Biosens Bioelectron 2020 Nov 1;168:112575. Epub 2020 Sep 1.

Federal Research & Clinical Center of Physical-Chemical Medicine of Federal Medical Biological Agency, Malaya Pirogovskaya 1a, Moscow, 119435, Russia.

A photonic crystal surface mode imaging (PCSMi) technique is implemented for the simultaneous detection of antibody binding with specific antigens in arrays containing 96- and 384-spots. Like the surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) technique, the presented approach is label-free and permits interrogating an analyte by hundreds of different ligands immobilized in small spots. The adsorption kinetics is recorded with a sub-picogram resolution at every spot simultaneously. Possible implementations of this technique for multiplexed and high-throughput biosensing are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2020.112575DOI Listing
November 2020

Electrical Excitation of Long-Range Surface Plasmons in PC/OLED Structure with Two Metal Nanolayers.

Nanomicro Lett 2020 Jan 22;12(1):35. Epub 2020 Jan 22.

Laboratoire de Physique de La Matière Vivante, IPHYS, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015, Lausanne, Switzerland.

A current-driven source of long-range surface plasmons (LRSPs) on a duplex metal nanolayer is reported. Electrical excitation of LRSPs was experimentally observed in a planar structure, where an organic light-emitting film was sandwiched between two metal nanolayers that served as electrodes. To achieve the LRSP propagation in these metal nanolayers at the interface with air, the light-emitting structure was bordered by a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) on the other side. The dispersion of the light emitted by such a hybrid PC/organic-light-emitting-diode structure (PC/OLED) comprising two thin metal electrodes was obtained, with a clearly identified LRSP resonance peak.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40820-020-0369-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7770686PMC
January 2020

Photonic crystal biosensor based on optical surface waves.

Sensors (Basel) 2013 Feb 19;13(2):2566-78. Epub 2013 Feb 19.

Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Fizicheskaya, 5, Troitsk, Moscow Region, 142190, Russia.

A label-free biosensor device based on registration of photonic crystal surface waves is described. Angular interrogation of the optical surface wave resonance is used to detect changes in the thickness of an adsorbed layer, while an additional simultaneous detection of the critical angle of total internal reflection provides independent data of the liquid refractive index. The abilities of the device are demonstrated by measuring of biotin molecule binding to a streptavidin monolayer, and by measuring association and dissociation kinetics of immunoglobulin G proteins. Additionally, deposition of PSS / PAH polyelectrolytes is recorded in situ resulting calculation of PSS and PAH monolayer thicknesses separately.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s130202566DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3649379PMC
February 2013

A biosensor based on photonic crystal surface waves with an independent registration of the liquid refractive index.

Biosens Bioelectron 2010 Jan 18;25(5):1212-6. Epub 2009 Sep 18.

Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow Region, Russia.

A high-precision optical biosensor technique capable of independently determining the refractive index (RI) of liquids is presented. Photonic crystal surface waves were used to detect surface binding events, while an independent registration of the critical angle was used for accurate determination of the liquid RI. This technique was tested using binding of biotin molecules to a streptavidin monolayer at low and high biotin concentrations. The attained baseline noise is 5x10(-13) m/Hz(1/2) for adlayer thickness changes and 9x10(-8) RIU/Hz(1/2) for RI changes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2009.09.011DOI Listing
January 2010

Long-range plasmons in lossy metal films on photonic crystal surfaces.

Opt Lett 2009 Feb;34(4):479-81

Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow region, 142190,

A one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal structure with a terminal palladium layer supporting long-range surface plasmon polariton (LRSPP) waves in any gaseous environment is described. We show that LRSPP propagation may be achieved not only along "good plasmonic" metals such as Ag and Au but also along lossy metals such as Pd, which does not usually support plasmon propagation in the visible spectral range with ordinary Kretschmann excitation. The possibility of the LRSPP propagation along catalytically active metals such as Pd or Pt opens up new perspectives for studying of (photo)chemical surface reactions and offers the potential for more applications in the general area of catalysis, photocatalysis, and plasmon-mediated chemistry. We present experimental results that demonstrate the hydrogen sensitivity of this photonic structure incorporating a catalytically active 8-nm-thick Pd final layer. A 3% hydrogen concentration in nitrogen is detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 300, with a response time of about 10 s at room temperature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/ol.34.000479DOI Listing
February 2009

Optical biosensors based on photonic crystal surface waves.

Methods Mol Biol 2009 ;503:49-64

Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow Region, Russia.

Optical biosensors have played a key role in the selective recognition of target biomolecules and in biomolecular interaction analysis, providing kinetic data about biological binding events in real time without labeling. The advantages of the label-free concept are the elimination of detrimental effects from labels that may interfere with fundamental interaction and the absence of a time-consuming pretreatment. The disadvantages of all label-free techniques--including the most mature one, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique, are a deficient sensitivity to a specific signal and undesirable susceptibilities to non-specific signals, e.g., to the volume effect of refraction index variations. These variations arise from temperature fluctuations and drifts and they are the limiting factor for many state-of-the-art optical biosensors. Here we describe a new optical biosensor technique based on the registration of dual optical s-polarized waves on a photonic crystal surface. The simultaneous registration of two different optical modes from the same surface spot permits the segregation of the volume and the surface signals, while the absence of metal damping permits an increase in the propagation length of the optical surface waves and the sensitivity of the biosensor. The technique was tested with the binding of biotin molecules to a streptavidin monolayer that has been detected with a signal/noise ratio of about 15 at 1 s signal accumulation time. The detection limit is about 20 fg of the analyte on the probed spot of the surface.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60327-567-5_4DOI Listing
March 2009

Photonic crystal surface waves for optical biosensors.

Anal Chem 2007 Jun 12;79(12):4729-35. Epub 2007 May 12.

We present a new optical biosensor technique based on registration of dual optical s-polarized modes on a photonic crystal surface. The simultaneous registration of two optical surface waves with different evanescent depths from the same surface spot permits the segregation of the volume and the surface contributions from an analyte, while the absence of metal damping permits an increase in the propagation length of the optical surface waves and the sensitivity of the biosensor. Our technique was tested with the binding of biotin molecules to a streptavidin monolayer that has been detected with signal/noise ratio of approximately 15 at 1-s signal accumulation time. The detection limit is approximately 20 fg of the analyte on the probed spot of the surface.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac070275yDOI Listing
June 2007

Long-range propagation of plasmon polaritons in a thin metal film on a one-dimensional photonic crystal surface.

Phys Rev Lett 2006 Dec 22;97(25):253904. Epub 2006 Dec 22.

Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow Region, 142190, Russia.

We present experimental results on ultralong-range surface plasmon polaritons, propagating in a thin metal film on a one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal surface over a distance of several millimeters. This propagation length is about 2 orders of magnitude higher than the one in the ordinary Kretschmann configuration at the same optical frequency. We show that a long-range surface plasmon polaritons propagation may take place not only in a (quasi)symmetrical scheme, where a thin metal film is located between two media with (approximately) the same refraction index, but also in a scheme where the thin metal film is located between an appropriate 1D photonic crystal and an arbitrary (air, water, etc.) medium. The ultralong-range surface plasmon polaritons are potentially important for biosensors, plasmonics, and other applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.253904DOI Listing
December 2006
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